1971 in the United Kingdom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1971 in the United Kingdom:
Other years
1969 | 1970 | 1971 (1971) | 1972 | 1973
Individual countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Sport, Television and music

Events from the year 1971 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • 1 March – An estimated 120,000 to 250,000 "kill the bill" protesters went on strike against the 1971 Industrial Relations Act in London.[6]
  • 5 March – The Pakistani army occupied East Pakistan.
  • 7 March – Following the recent protests in London, some 10,000 striking workers protested in Glasgow against the Industrial Relations Bill.
  • 8 March – The Postal workers' strike ended after 47 days.[7]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

  • 7 June – The children's show Blue Peter buried a time capsule in the grounds of BBC Television Centre, due to be opened on the first episode of the year 2000.
  • 14 June
  • 15 June
    • Several Labour run councils threatened to increase rates in order to continue the free supply of milk to school children aged over seven years, in reaction to Thatcher's plans to end free milk supply to school children of that age group. Thatcher defends her plans, saying that the change will free more money to be spent on the construction of new school buildings.[13]
    • Upper Clyde Shipbuilders entered liquidation.[14]
  • 20 June – Britain announced that Soviet space scientist Anatoli Fedoseyev had been granted asylum.
  • 21 June – Britain began new negotiations for EEC membership in Luxembourg.
  • 24 June – The EEC agreed terms for Britain's proposed membership and it was hoped that the nation will join the EEC next year.
  • 25–27 June - The first Reading Festival "of jazz and progressive music" took place.

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • 6 August – Chay Blyth became the first person to sail around the world east to west against the prevailing winds.[18]
  • 9 August – British security forces in Northern Ireland detained hundreds of guerilla suspects and put them into Long Kesh prison - the beginning of an internment without trial policy. Twenty died in the riots that followed, including eleven in Ballymurphy Massacre.[19]
  • 11 August – Prime Minister Edward Heath participated in the British victory in the Admiral's Cup yacht race.[5]
  • 14 August – The Who released their critically acclaimed album Who's Next.
  • 15 August – Showjumper Harvey Smith was stripped of his victory in the British Show Jumping Derby by judges for making a V sign.[20]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

  • 10 November – The 10-route Spaghetti Junction motorway interchange was opened north of Birmingham city centre, incorporating the A38 (M) (Aston Expressway) and the southern section of the M6 motorway. The interchange would have a total of 12 routes when the final stretch of the M6 was opened the following year.[26]
  • 22 November – Six climbers died trying to climb Cairn Gorm.[27]

December[edit]

Undated[edit]

Publications[edit]

Births[edit]

January - March[edit]

April - June[edit]

July - September[edit]

October - December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January – March[edit]

April – June[edit]

July – September[edit]

October – December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A brief history of divorce". The Guardian (London). 19 September 2009. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  2. ^ "1971: Sixty-six die in Scottish football disaster". BBC News. 2 January 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  3. ^ "1971: British minister's home bombed". BBC News. 12 January 1971. Archived from the original on 16 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  4. ^ "1971: Britain allowed to sell arms to S Africa". BBC News. 23 January 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0. 
  6. ^ Beckett, Andy (2009). When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the Seventies. London: Faber. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-571-22136-3. 
  7. ^ "1971: Post strike ends with pay deal". BBC News. 8 March 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  8. ^ "1971: Protest disrupts Welsh language trial". BBC News. 27 April 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Marr, Andrew (2007). A History of Modern Britain. London: Macmillan. p. 330. ISBN 978-1-4050-0538-8. 
  11. ^ "1971: Britain's oldest tabloid closes". BBC News. 11 May 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  12. ^ "Chelsea 2-1 Real Madrid". Mirror Football. Daily Mirror. Retrieved 2013-01-21. 
  13. ^ "1971: Councils defy Thatcher milk ban". BBC News. 15 June 1971. Retrieved 12 April 2011. 
  14. ^ "Provisional liquidator is appointed for Upper Clyde Shipbuilders". The Times (58200) (London). 16 June 1971. p. 18. 
  15. ^ a b "1971: Suicide note reveals murder confession". BBC News. 14 July 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-14. 
  16. ^ "1971: British troops shoot Londonderry rioters". BBC News. 8 July 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  17. ^ Murray, Ian (31 July 1971). "Workers seize control of shipyard on the Clyde". The Times (58238) (London). p. 1. 
  18. ^ "1971: Sailor's record 'wrong way' voyage". BBC News. 6 August 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  19. ^ "1971: NI activates internment law". BBC News. 9 August 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  20. ^ "1971: 'V-sign' costs rider victory". BBC News. 15 August 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  21. ^ "1971: British diplomat freed after eight months". BBC News. 9 September 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  22. ^ "1971: Army blasts N Ireland border roads". BBC News. 13 October 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  23. ^ Duguld, Mark. "Edna the Inebriate Woman (1971)". screenonline. BFI. Retrieved 2010-07-12. 
  24. ^ "1971: Two women shot at Belfast checkpoint". BBC News. 23 October 1971. Archived from the original on 2 February 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  25. ^ "1971: Bomb explodes in Post Office tower". BBC News. 31 October 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  26. ^ [2]
  27. ^ "1971: Six dead in Scottish mountain tragedy". BBC News. 22 November 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  28. ^ "1971: Bomb demolishes crowded Belfast pub". BBC News. 4 December 1971. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  29. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1971". Retrieved 2008-02-02. 
  30. ^ [3]
  31. ^ Davies, Glyn (1996). A History of Money from ancient times to the present day (rev. ed.). Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-1351-5. 

See also[edit]