List of World Heritage Sites in Indonesia

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The UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) has designated 8 World Heritage Sites in Indonesia.[1][2]

Selection is based on ten criteria: six for cultural heritage (i–vi) and four for natural heritage (vii–x).[3] Some sites, designated "mixed sites," represent both cultural and natural heritage. In Indonesia, there are 4 cultural, 4 natural, and no mixed sites.[1]

The World Heritage Committee may also specify that a site is endangered, citing "conditions which threaten the very characteristics for which a property was inscribed on the World Heritage List." Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra.

Location of sites[edit]

Legend[edit]

The table is sortable by column by clicking on the Sort both.gif at the top of the appropriate column; alphanumerically for the Site, Area, and Year columns; by state party for the Location column; and by criteria type for the Criteria column. Transborder sites sort at the bottom.

Site; named after the World Heritage Committee's official designation[4]
Location; at city, regional, or provincial level and geocoordinates
Criteria; as defined by the World Heritage Committee[3]
Area; in hectares and acres. If available, the size of the buffer zone has been noted as well. A value of zero implies that no data has been published by UNESCO
Year; during which the site was inscribed to the World Heritage List
Description; brief information about the site, including reasons for qualifying as an endangered site, if applicable

Inscribed sites[edit]

  † In danger
Site Image Location Criteria Area
ha (acre)
Year Description Refs
Borobudur Temple Compounds A terraced pyramid like structure with a stupa on top. Magelang Regency, Central Java
7°36′28″S 110°12′13″E / 7.60778°S 110.20361°E / -7.60778; 110.20361 (Borobudur Temple Compounds)
Cultural:
(i), (ii), (vi)
1991 592[5]
Cultural Landscape of Bali Province: the Subak System as a Manifestation of the Tri Hita Karana Philosophy Rice terrace at entrance to Gunung Kawi temple demonstrate the traditional Subak irrigation system, Tampaksiring, Bali. Bali
8°20′0″S 115°0′0″E / 8.33333°S 115.00000°E / -8.33333; 115.00000 (Cultural Landscape of Bali Province)
Cultural:
(ii), (iii), (v), (vi)
700419520000000000019,520 (48,200) 2012 1194rev[6]
Komodo National Park Waran lying on its belly in a dry grass area. East Nusa Tenggara
8°33′S 119°29′E / 8.550°S 119.483°E / -8.550; 119.483 (Komodo National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (x)
7005219322000000000219,322 (541,960) 1991 609[7]
Lorentz National Park A rocky mountain ridge. Papua
4°45′S 137°50′E / 4.750°S 137.833°E / -4.750; 137.833 (Lorentz National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (ix), (x)
70062350000000000002,350,000 (5,800,000) 1999 955[8]
Prambanan Temple Compounds Symmetrically arranged stone buildings. The steep roofs are decorated with a large number of small stupas. Central Java
7°45′8″S 110°29′30″E / 7.75222°S 110.49167°E / -7.75222; 110.49167 (Prambanan Temple Compounds)
Cultural:
(i), (iv)
1991 642[9]
Sangiran Early Man Site Upper part of a petrified skull including some teeth. Central Java
7°24′0″S 110°49′0″E / 7.40000°S 110.81667°E / -7.40000; 110.81667 (Sangiran Early Man Site)
Cultural:
(iii), (vi)
70035600000000000005,600 (14,000) 1996 593[10]
Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra A high mountain beyond grassland interspersed with trees. Sumatra,
2°30′S 101°30′E / 2.500°S 101.500°E / -2.500; 101.500 (Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra)
Natural:
(vii), (ix), (x)
70062595124000000002,595,124 (6,412,690) 2004 The site has been listed as endangered since 2011 due to poaching, illegal logging, agricultural encroachment, and plans to build roads. 1167[11][12]
Ujung Kulon National Park Rocky ground within a tropical forest. Banten and Lampung
6°45′S 105°20′E / 6.750°S 105.333°E / -6.750; 105.333 (Ujung Kulon National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (x)
700478525000000000078,525 (194,040) 1991 608[13]

Tentative list[edit]

The following 26 sites are on the Tentative List for Indonesia, meaning that the government intends to consider them for nomination in the future:[14]

Site Image Location Criteria Area
ha (acre)
Year Description Refs
Banda Islands The island of Run was once traded for Manhattan it was a valuable source of spice. Central Maluku Regency, Maluku
40°28′0″S 129°39′0″E / 40.46667°S 129.65000°E / -40.46667; 129.65000 (Banda Island)
Natural:
(vii), (x)
2005 2004[15]
Banten Ancient City The Great Mosque of Banten, from east side. Serang Regency, Banten
6°30′0″S 106°15′0″E / 6.50000°S 106.25000°E / -6.50000; 106.25000 (Banten)
Cultural
1995 286[16]
Bawomataluo Site Omo Sebua means the big house. This is a traditional house from South Nias. South Nias Regency, Nias, North Sumatra
00°36′59″N 97°46′17″E / 0.61639°N 97.77139°E / 0.61639; 97.77139 (Bawomataluo)
Cultural:
(i), (iv), (vi)
5 ha 2009 5463[17]
Belgica Fort An Indonesian island of Banda Besar seen from Fort Belgica. Central Maluku Regency, Maluku
40°28′0″S 129°39′0″E / 40.46667°S 129.65000°E / -40.46667; 129.65000 (Banda Island)
Cultural:
(iii)
1995 297[18]
Besakih A Hindu Dharma prayer ceremony at Bali's Bekasih Temple. Karangasem Regency, Bali
8°22′35″S 115°31′1″E / 8.37639°S 115.51694°E / -8.37639; 115.51694 (Besakih)
Cultural:
(i)
1995 296[19]
Betung Kerihun National Park (Transborder Rainforest Heritage of Borneo) West Kalimantan
0°40′0″N 112°15′0″E / 0.66667°N 112.25000°E / 0.66667; 112.25000 (Betung Kerihun National Park)
Natural:
(viii), (ix), (x)
800,000 ha 1871[20]
Bunaken National Park Bunaken National Marine Park, Manado, Indonesia. Manado, North Sulawesi
1°35′0″N 124°39′0″E / 1.58333°N 124.65000°E / 1.58333; 124.65000 (Bunaken National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (viii), (ix), (x)
280,000 ha 2005 2002[21]
Derawan Islands A quiet morning in Derawan Island, East Kalimantan. Berau Regency, East Kalimantan
2°15′0″N 118°25′0″E / 2.25000°N 118.41667°E / 2.25000; 118.41667 (Derawan Islands)
Natural:
(x)
2005 2007[22]
Elephant Cave This is the entrance to the "Elephant Cave" at the Goa Gajah Temple Near Ubud, Bali, Indonesia. Gianyar Regency, Bali
8°31′24.2″S 115°17′10.89″E / 8.523389°S 115.2863583°E / -8.523389; 115.2863583 (Elephant Cave)
Cultural:
1995 299[23]
Great Mosque of Demak Demak Great Mosque. Demak Regency, Central Java
6°53′31″S 110°38′28″E / 6.89194°S 110.64111°E / -6.89194; 110.64111 (Great Mosque of Demak)
Cultural:
1995 289[24]
Gunongan Historical Park Gunongan Historical Park. Banda Aceh, Aceh
5°32′44″N 95°18′58″E / 5.54556°N 95.31611°E / 5.54556; 95.31611 (Gunongan Historical Park)
Cultural:
1995 300[25]
Muara Takus Compound Site Muara Takus Compound Site. Kampar Regency, Riau
0°20′20″N 100°38′24.62″E / 0.33889°N 100.6401722°E / 0.33889; 100.6401722 (Muara Takus Compound Site)
Cultural:
(i), (iv), (vi)
2009 5464[26]
Muarajambi Temple Compound Muarajambi Temple Compound. Muaro Jambi Regency, Jambi
1°24′0″S 103°2′0″E / 1.40000°S 103.03333°E / -1.40000; 103.03333 (Muarajambi Temple Compound)
Cultural:
(ii), (iii), (iv)
2062 ha 2009 5464[27]
Ngada traditional house and megalithic complex Ngada traditional house and megalithic complex. Ngada Regency, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara
8°47′0″S 120°9′0″E / 8.78333°S 120.15000°E / -8.78333; 120.15000 (Ngada traditional house and megalithic complex)
Cultural:
1995 293[28]
Penataran Hindu Temple Complex Penataran Hindu Temple Complex. Blitar Regency, East Java
8°0′57″S 112°12′33″E / 8.01583°S 112.20917°E / -8.01583; 112.20917 (Penataran Hindu Temple Complex)
Cultural:
(iv)
1995 294[29]
Prehistoric Cave Sites in Maros-Pangkep Prehistoric Cave Sites in Maros-Pangkep. Maros Regency, South Sulawesi
4°42′49″S 119°34′17″E / 4.71361°S 119.57139°E / -4.71361; 119.57139 (Prehistoric Cave Sites in Maros-Pangkep)
Natural:
(ix)
21,631 ha forest area, 43,750 ha the Karst Maros-Pangkep area 2009 5467[30]
Pulau Penyengat Palace Complex Pulau Penyengat Palace Complex. Riau Islands Province
0°55′40″N 104°25′3″E / 0.92778°N 104.41750°E / 0.92778; 104.41750 (Pulau Penyengat Palace Complex)
Cultural:
1995 298[31]
Raja Ampat Islands Raja Ampat Islands. West Papua province
0°30′0″N 124°30′0″E / 0.50000°N 124.50000°E / 0.50000; 124.50000 (Raja Ampat Islands)
Natural:
(vii), (x)
4.6 million ha 2005 2003[32]
Ratu Boko Temple Complex Ratu Boko Temple Complex. Yogyakarta Special Region
7°46′12″S 110°29′20″E / 7.77000°S 110.48889°E / -7.77000; 110.48889 (Ratu Boko Temple Complex)
Cultural:
1995 287[33]
Sukuh Hindu Temple Sukuh Hindu Temple. Karanganyar Regency Central Java
7°37′38.85″S 111°7′52.65″E / 7.6274583°S 111.1312917°E / -7.6274583; 111.1312917 (Sukuh Hindu Temple)
Cultural:
1995 295[34]
Taka Bonerate National Park Selayar Regency, South Sulawesi
6°16′0″S 120°54′0″E / 6.26667°S 120.90000°E / -6.26667; 120.90000 (Taka Bonerate National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (viii), (ix), (x)
530,765 ha 2005 2005[35]
Tana Toraja Traditional Settlement Tana Toraja Traditional Settlement. Tana Toraja Regency, South Sulawesi
2°36′0″S 119°22′0″E / 2.60000°S 119.36667°E / -2.60000; 119.36667 (Tana Toraja Traditional Settlement)
Cultural:
(iv), (v), (vi)
3,205 km2 2009 5462[36]
Trowulan - Former Capital City of Majapahit Kingdom Trowulan - Former Capital City of Majapahit Kingdom. Mojokerto Regency, East Java
7°30′0″S 112°18′0″E / 7.50000°S 112.30000°E / -7.50000; 112.30000 (Trowulan - Former Capital City of Majapahit Kingdom)
Cultural:
(i), (v)
99 km2 2009 5466[37]
Wakatobi National Park Wakatobi National Park. Buton Regency, Southeast Sulawesi
5°12′0″S 123°20′0″E / 5.20000°S 123.33333°E / -5.20000; 123.33333 (Wakatobi National Park)
Natural:
(vii), (viii), (ix), (x)
1,390,000 ha 2005 2006[38]
Waruga Burial Complex Waruga Burial Complex North Sulawesi Cultural:
(i)
1995 292[39]
Yogyakarta Palace Complex Yogyakarta Palace Complex. Yogyakarta, Special Region of Yogyakarta
7°48′23.6″S 110°21′50.6″E / 7.806556°S 110.364056°E / -7.806556; 110.364056 (Yogyakarta Palace Complex)
Cultural:
1995 291[40]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World Heritage Properties in Indonesia". UNESCO. Retrieved 1 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Composition of macro geographical (continental) regions, geographical sub-regions, and selected economic and other groupings". Geographical region and composition of each region. United Nations Statistics Division. 2010. Retrieved 20 October 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "The Criteria for Selection". UNESCO. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  4. ^ "World Heritage List Nominations". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  5. ^ "Borobudur Temple Compounds". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  6. ^ "Cultural Landscape of Bali Province". UNESCO. Retrieved 1 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Komodo National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "Lorentz National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  9. ^ "Prambanan Temple Compounds". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  10. ^ "Sangiran Early Man Site". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  11. ^ "Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra". UNESCO. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  12. ^ "Danger listing for Indonesia's Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra". UNESCO. Retrieved 26 July 2011. 
  13. ^ "Ujung Kulon National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 28 May 2010. 
  14. ^ "Tentative Lists: Indonesia". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  15. ^ "Banda Islands". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  16. ^ "Banten Ancient City". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  17. ^ "Bawomataluo Site". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  18. ^ "Belgica Fort". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  19. ^ "Besakih". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  20. ^ "Betung Kerihun National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  21. ^ "Bunaken National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  22. ^ "Derawan Islands". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  23. ^ "Elephant Cave". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  24. ^ "Great Mosque of Demak". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  25. ^ "Gunongan Historical Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  26. ^ "Muara Takus Compound Site". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  27. ^ "Muarajambi Temple Compound". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  28. ^ "Ngada traditional house and megalithic complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  29. ^ "Penataran Hindu Temple Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  30. ^ "Prehistoric Cave Sites in Maros-Pangkep". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  31. ^ "Pulau Penyengat Palace Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  32. ^ "Raja Ampat Islands". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  33. ^ "Ratu Boko Temple Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  34. ^ "Sukuh Hindu Temple". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  35. ^ "Taka Bonerate National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  36. ^ "Tana Toraja Traditional Settlement". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  37. ^ "Trowulan - Former Capital City of Majapahit Kingdom". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  38. ^ "Wakatobi National Park". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  39. ^ "Waruga Burial Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 
  40. ^ "Yogyakarta Palace Complex". UNESCO. Retrieved 8 April 2012. 

References[edit]

General