Delaware County, Indiana

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Delaware County
Delaware County Building
Delaware County Building
Official seal of Delaware County
Map of Indiana highlighting Delaware County
Location within the U.S. state of Indiana
Map of the United States highlighting Indiana
Indiana's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°14′N 85°24′W / 40.23°N 85.4°W / 40.23; -85.4
Country United States
State Indiana
Founded1820 (created)
1827 (organized)
SeatMuncie
Largest cityMuncie
Area
 • Total395.91 sq mi (1,025.4 km2)
 • Land392.12 sq mi (1,015.6 km2)
 • Water3.78 sq mi (9.8 km2)  0.95%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
111,903
 • Density300.1/sq mi (115.9/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.co.delaware.in.us
Indiana county number 18

Delaware County is a county in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2020, the population was 111,903.[1] The county seat is Muncie.[2]

Delaware County is part of the Muncie, IN metropolitan statistical area, which is part of the larger Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie CSA.

History[edit]

Muncie from the northwest.

Delaware County was authorized in Jan. 1820 on New Purchase lands south of the Wabash River gained with the 1818 Treaty of St. Mary's. It encompassed the drainage basin of the White River, along which the Delaware, a Native American people had settled, and from which the County takes its name. The Delaware people were moved to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1840s. The county was once home to Tenskwatawa ("The Prophet"), a brother of Tecumseh who instigated a major Indian uprising in 1811 culminating in the Battle of Tippecanoe. David Conner, a trader, was the first white settler, arriving in the early 1810s.[3] After formation, numerous counties were carved from the original, and a remnant retaining the original name was organized in 1827.

Following the American Civil War the county experienced an economic boom caused by the discovery of natural gas, which spurred rapid industrial growth in the surrounding area.

The first discovery of natural gas in Indiana occurred in 1876 near Eaton. A company was drilling in search of coal, and when they had reaching a depth of six-hundred feet, there was a loud noise and foul-smelling fumes came from the well. After a brief investigation, it was decided they had breached the ceiling of Hell, and the hole was quickly filled in. In 1884, when natural gas was discovered in nearby Ohio, people recalled the incident. They returned to the spot and opened Indiana's first natural gas well. The gas was so abundant and strong that when the well was lit, the flames could be seen from Muncie.[4]

Geography[edit]

Delaware County consists of low rolling prairie, accented by waterways. The Mississinewa River flows westward through the northern part of the county while the White River runs westward through the central part of the county, through Muncie.[5] A large reservoir, Prairie Creek Reservoir, SE of Muncie is managed by the city.[6] The soil is fertile.[7] The county's high point is a hilly area in its SE corner, 4 miles (6 km) ESE from Prairie Creek Reservoir.[8]

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 395.91 square miles (1,025.4 km2), of which 392.12 square miles (1,015.6 km2) (or 99.04%) is land and 3.78 square miles (9.8 km2) (or 0.95%) is water.[9]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Cities and towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

Muncie, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
2.1
 
 
33
16
 
 
2.3
 
 
38
20
 
 
3.1
 
 
48
29
 
 
3.6
 
 
61
39
 
 
4.2
 
 
72
51
 
 
4.3
 
 
81
60
 
 
4
 
 
85
64
 
 
3.5
 
 
83
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3
 
 
76
54
 
 
2.6
 
 
64
42
 
 
3.4
 
 
50
33
 
 
3
 
 
38
22
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[10]

In recent years, average temperatures in Muncie have ranged from a low of 16 °F (−9 °C) in January to a high of 85 °F (29 °C) in July, although a record low of −29 °F (−34 °C) was recorded in January 1994 and a record high of 102 °F (39 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.06 inches (52 mm) in January to 4.28 inches (109 mm) in June.[10]

Government[edit]

The county government is a constitutional body, granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana and the Indiana Code.

County Council: The legislative branch of the county government; controls spending and revenue collection in the county. There are seven members of the county council. Three are elected county-wide and four are elected from county districts. The county-wide members are elected in presidential election years (2016, 2020, etc.) and the districted members are elected in midterm election years (2018, 2022, etc.). The current members are:

  • District 1: Ryan Ballard (R)
  • District 2: Ron Quakenbush (R)
  • District 3: Mary Chambers (D)
  • District 4: Jane Lasater (R)
  • At-Large: Scott Alexander (R)
  • At-Large: Jessica Piper (R)
  • At-large: Ryan Webb (R)

The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[11][12]

Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county. Each commissioner represents a district (in which they must reside). The commissioners are elected county-wide to staggered four-year terms. The current commissioners are:

  • District 1: James King (R)[a]
  • District 2: Sherry Riggin (R)
  • District 3: Shannon Henry (R)

One commissioners serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[11][12]

Court: The county maintains five circuit courts, each with its own judge. The judges are elected in staggered six-year terms on a county-wide, partisan ballot. The current judges are:

  • Circuit Court 1: Marianne Vorhees (D)
  • Circuit Court 2: Kimberly Dowling (D)
  • Circuit Court 3: Linda Ralu Wolf (D)
  • Circuit Court 4: John Feick (R)
  • Circuit Court 5: Thomas Cannon Jr. (D)

In some cases, court decisions can be appealed to the state level court of appeals.[12]

County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, prosecutor, assessor, and circuit court clerk:

  • Sheriff: Tony Skinner (R)
  • Coroner: Rick Howell (R)
  • Auditor: Steve Craycraft (D)
  • Treasurer: Ed Carroll (R)
  • Recorder: Melanie Marshall (R)
  • Surveyor: Tom Borchers (R)
  • Prosecutor: Eric Hoffman (D)
  • Assessor: James Carmichael (R)
  • Clerk: Rick Spangler (R)

Each serves a four-year term. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[12]

Delaware County is part of Indiana's 6th congressional district; Indiana Senate districts 25 and 26;[13] and Indiana House of Representatives districts 31, 32, 33, 34 and 35.[14]

United States presidential election results for Delaware County, Indiana[15][16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 26,827 55.67% 20,474 42.49% 890 1.85%
2016 24,263 53.32% 18,153 39.89% 3,089 6.79%
2012 21,251 47.15% 22,654 50.26% 1,169 2.59%
2008 20,916 41.85% 28,384 56.80% 676 1.35%
2004 27,064 56.46% 20,436 42.63% 439 0.92%
2000 22,105 50.07% 20,876 47.29% 1,166 2.64%
1996 18,126 40.40% 20,385 45.44% 6,352 14.16%
1992 20,473 40.36% 19,556 38.56% 10,692 21.08%
1988 27,348 56.84% 20,548 42.71% 216 0.45%
1984 30,092 59.98% 19,791 39.45% 288 0.57%
1980 28,342 53.83% 20,923 39.74% 3,382 6.42%
1976 26,417 50.72% 25,151 48.29% 519 1.00%
1972 32,468 64.21% 17,936 35.47% 163 0.32%
1968 23,554 47.56% 19,532 39.44% 6,437 13.00%
1964 20,022 41.13% 28,469 58.48% 187 0.38%
1960 26,167 52.75% 23,266 46.90% 177 0.36%
1956 24,792 54.10% 20,818 45.43% 217 0.47%
1952 24,272 55.68% 18,733 42.98% 585 1.34%
1948 15,662 46.72% 17,060 50.89% 803 2.40%
1944 17,340 47.41% 18,780 51.35% 455 1.24%
1940 17,616 45.53% 20,836 53.85% 239 0.62%
1936 14,207 42.37% 19,048 56.81% 272 0.81%
1932 16,012 51.25% 14,346 45.91% 887 2.84%
1928 19,102 68.79% 8,532 30.72% 136 0.49%
1924 14,411 61.74% 7,830 33.55% 1,099 4.71%
1920 14,845 61.78% 8,329 34.66% 856 3.56%
1916 6,919 50.24% 5,946 43.18% 906 6.58%
1912 2,018 16.44% 4,313 35.13% 5,947 48.44%
1908 7,014 51.29% 5,725 41.86% 937 6.85%
1904 8,522 63.36% 3,673 27.31% 1,255 9.33%
1900 8,301 61.81% 4,647 34.60% 482 3.59%
1896 7,340 62.29% 4,253 36.09% 191 1.62%
1892 4,908 59.08% 2,862 34.45% 537 6.46%
1888 4,227 62.23% 2,368 34.86% 198 2.91%


Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18203,677
18302,374−35.4%
18408,843272.5%
185010,84322.6%
186015,75345.3%
187019,03020.8%
188022,92620.5%
189030,13131.4%
190049,62464.7%
191051,4143.6%
192056,3779.7%
193067,27019.3%
194074,96311.4%
195090,25220.4%
1960110,93822.9%
1970129,21916.5%
1980128,587−0.5%
1990119,659−6.9%
2000118,769−0.7%
2010117,671−0.9%
2020111,903−4.9%
2021 (est.)111,355−5.4%
US Decennial Census[17]
1790-1960[18] 1900-1990[19]
1990-2000[20] 2010-2019[1]

2020 Census[edit]

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 111,903 people and 46,026 households in the county.[21] The population density was 300.1 inhabitants per square mile (115.9/km2). There were 52,713 housing units at an average density of 134.4 per square mile (51.9/km2).[21] The racial makeup of the county was 88.7% white, 7.2% African American, 0.3% American Indian or Alaska Native, 1.3% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.6% Hispanic or Latino and 2.4% were from two or more races.

4.8% of the population were age 5 or younger, 18.2% were under the age of 18, 64.3% were between the ages of 18 and 64, and 17.5% were age 65 or older. 48.2% were male and 51.8% were female. The average household size was 2.34. 3.4% of households had a language other than English spoken at home.

88.1% of households had a computer present and 78.3% had a broadband Internet connection. 13.1% of the population under 65 had a disability and 10.3% of that same age group had no health insurance. 58.5% of the population was in the civilian labor force. (54.8% of females) Total retail sales per capita was $12,950.

The median household income in Delaware County was $43,512 and the per capita income from May 2019 to April 2020 was $25,107. 21.5% of the population was in poverty.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 117,671 people, 46,516 households, and 27,956 families in the county.[22] The population density was 300.1 inhabitants per square mile (115.9/km2). There were 52,357 housing units at an average density of 133.5 per square mile (51.5/km2).[9] The racial makeup of the county was 89.1% white, 6.9% black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 0.6% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population.[22] In terms of ancestry, 23.0% were German, 14.2% were Irish, 10.6% were American, and 10.3% were English.[23]

Of the 46,516 households, 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.4% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.9% were non-families, and 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 34.8 years.[22]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $51,394. Males had a median income of $42,346 versus $31,051 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,405. About 12.3% of families and 20.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.1% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[24]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ King was initially elected as a Democrat but switched to Republican in 2016 and won reelection as such.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Delaware County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 17, 2011.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ De Witt Clinton Goodrich & Charles Richard Tuttle (1875). An Illustrated History of the State of Indiana. Indiana: R. S. Peale & Co. pp. 556.
  4. ^ Gray, Ralph (1995). Indiana History: A Book of Readings. Indiana University Press. p. 187. ISBN 0-253-32629-X.
  5. ^ Delaware County IN (Google Maps, accessed 24 January 2020)
  6. ^ Muncie Prairie Creek Reservoir/City of Muncie (accessed 24 January 2020)
  7. ^ Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Delaware, the name of five counties in the United States. IV. An E. county of Indiana" . The American Cyclopædia.
  8. ^ Delaware County High Point, Indiana (PeakBagger.com, accessed 24 January 2020)
  9. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  10. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Muncie IN". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 27, 2011.
  11. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  12. ^ a b c d Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2" (PDF). IN.gov. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  13. ^ "Indiana Senate Districts". State of Indiana. Retrieved January 23, 2011.
  14. ^ "Indiana House Districts". State of Indiana. Retrieved January 23, 2011.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  16. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 4,059 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 1,199 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 637 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 52 votes.
  17. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  18. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  19. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  20. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  21. ^ a b https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/delawarecountyindiana/PST045219. Retrieved August 26, 2021. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  23. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  24. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°14′N 85°24′W / 40.23°N 85.40°W / 40.23; -85.40