Dimethylstilbestrol

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Dimethylstilbestrol
Dimethylstilbestrol.svg
Clinical data
Other namesDMS; (Ε)-α,α'-Dimethyl-4,4'-stilbenediol
Drug classNonsteroidal estrogen
Identifiers
  • 4-[(E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)but-2-en-2-yl]phenol
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC16H16O2
Molar mass240.302 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • C/C(=C(/C)\C1=CC=C(C=C1)O)/C2=CC=C(C=C2)O
  • InChI=1S/C16H16O2/c1-11(13-3-7-15(17)8-4-13)12(2)14-5-9-16(18)10-6-14/h3-10,17-18H,1-2H3/b12-11+
  • Key:XPINIPXARSNZDM-VAWYXSNFSA-N

Dimethylstilbestrol (DMS) is a nonsteroidal estrogen of the stilbestrol group related to diethylstilbestrol which was never marketed.[1][2][3][4][5] It is a so-called "weak", "impeded", or "short-acting" estrogen similarly to estriol and meso-butoestrol.[6][7][8][9] The affinity of DMS for the ER was reported as about 10% of that of estradiol.[10] For comparison, diethylstilbestrol had 140% of the affinity of estradiol for the ER.[10]

The endometrial proliferation dose of DMS in women is 20 mg.[11] A single 12 mg intramuscular injection of DMS has a duration of approximately 12 days in humans.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gregory Pincus (3 September 2013). The Control of Fertility. Elsevier. pp. 126–. ISBN 978-1-4832-7088-3.
  2. ^ Ralph I. Dorfman (5 December 2016). Steroidal Activity in Experimental Animals and Man. Elsevier Science. pp. 83–. ISBN 978-1-4832-7299-3.
  3. ^ Alan C. Sartorelli; David G. Johns (27 November 2013). Antineoplastic and Immunosuppressive Agents. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 110–. ISBN 978-3-642-65806-8.
  4. ^ William McGuire (14 December 2013). Experimental Biology. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 169–. ISBN 978-1-4757-4673-0.
  5. ^ Karl Knörr; Fritz K. Beller; Christian Lauritzen (17 April 2013). Lehrbuch der Gynäkologie. Springer-Verlag. pp. 213–. ISBN 978-3-662-00942-0.
  6. ^ Katzenellenbogen BS, Iwamoto HS, Heiman DF, Lan NC, Katzenellenbogen JA (1978). "Stilbestrols and stilbestrol derivatives: estrogenic potency and temporal relationships between estrogen receptor binding and uterine growth". Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 10 (1): 103–13. doi:10.1016/0303-7207(78)90063-1. PMID 564791. S2CID 45882988.
  7. ^ Martin L (January 1969). "Dimethylstilbestrol and 16-oxo-estradiol: anti-estrogens or estrogens?". Steroids. 13 (1): 1–10. doi:10.1016/s0039-128x(69)80055-3. PMID 5764482.
  8. ^ Emmens CW, Cox RI, Martin L (July 1959). "Oestrogen inhibitors of the stilboestrol series". J. Endocrinol. 18 (4): 372–80. doi:10.1677/joe.0.0180372. PMID 13820198.
  9. ^ Emmens CW, Cox RI (September 1958). "Dimethylstilboestrol as an oestrogen inhibitor". J. Endocrinol. 17 (3): 265–71. doi:10.1677/joe.0.0170265. PMID 13587831.
  10. ^ a b Jordan VC, Lieberman ME (September 1984). "Estrogen-stimulated prolactin synthesis in vitro. Classification of agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist actions based on structure". Mol Pharmacol. 26 (2): 279–85. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.1064.9508. PMID 6541293.
  11. ^ a b Karl Knörr; Fritz K. Beller; Christian Lauritzen (17 April 2013). Lehrbuch der Gynäkologie. Springer-Verlag. pp. 212–213. ISBN 978-3-662-00942-0.