List of mountain passes and hills in the Tour de France

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This is a list of mountain passes and hills in the Tour de France. Among the passes most often crossed, Col du Tourmalet, Col d'Aubisque, Col d'Aspin, Col de Peyresourde and Col du Galibier predominate, while the highest peak ever reached is Cime de la Bonette-Restefond (2,802 m (9,193 ft)), used in the 1962, 1964, 1993 and 2008 Tour de France.[1]

The highest mountain finishes in the history of the Tour were Galibier (2,645 m (8,677 ft)) in 2011; previously this had been Val Thorens (2,275 m (7,464 ft)) in 1994; and before that Col du Granon (2,413 m (7,917 ft)) used in 1986.[1]

Contents

2001 Tour de France[edit]

The 2001 Tour de France included 19 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2002 Tour de France[edit]

The 2002 Tour de France included 21 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2003 Tour de France[edit]

The 2003 Tour de France included 22 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2004 Tour de France[edit]

The 2004 Tour de France included 22 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2005 Tour de France[edit]

The 2005 Tour de France included 23 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2006 Tour de France[edit]

The 2006 Tour de France included 22 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2007 Tour de France[edit]

The 2007 Tour de France included 22 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

In 2007, the Tour had a stage finish at the summit of Col d'Aubisque (1,709 m (5,607 ft)) for the first time. Earlier that year the riders crossed the Alps, both Col de l'Iseran (2,770 m (9,090 ft)) and Col du Galibier (2,645 m (8,678 ft)) on the same stage.[1]

2008 Tour de France[edit]

The 2008 Tour de France included 17 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.

2009 Tour de France[edit]

The 2009 Tour de France included 21 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2. Seven of them were situated in the Pyrenees, three in the Vosges, nine in the Alps, one in the Ardèche and one in the Pre-Alps:[2]

2010 Tour de France[edit]

The 2010 Tour de France included 23 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2. One of them were situated in the Jura, eight in the Alps, two in the Cévennes, and twelve in the Pyrenees:[3]

2011 Tour de France[edit]

The 2011 Tour de France included 23 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2. Four of them are situated in the Massif Central, nine in the Pyrenees, and ten in the Alps:[4]

2012 Tour de France[edit]

The 2012 tour included three uphill finishes: La Planche des Belles Filles (stage 7), La Toussuire - Les Sybelles (stage 11) and Peyragudes (stage 17). The Col du Grand Colombier was included for the first time, and was among six Hors catégorie rated climbs in the Alps and Pyrenees.[5][6]

2013 Tour de France[edit]

The 2013 Tour de France included 28 climbs ranked Category 2 or higher of which seven were Hors catégorie climbs, eight Category 1 and thirteen were Second Category. There were four "mountain top" finishes: at Ax-3 Domaines in the Pyrenees, Mont Ventoux in Provence, and Alpe d'Huez and Annecy-Semnoz in the Alps. Alpe d'Huez was used twice on stage 18, both times ranked Hors catégorie.[7]

2014 Tour de France[edit]

The 2014 Tour de France includes 25 climbs ranked Category 2 or higher of which six are Hors catégorie climbs, eleven Category 1 and eight are Second Category. There are seven "mountain top" finishes: at La Mauselaine (Category 3) and La Planche des Belles Filles in the Vosges, Chamrousse and Risoul in the Alps, and Saint-Lary Pla d'Adet and Hautacam in the Pyrenees.[8][9]

2015 Tour de France[edit]

The 2015 Tour de France includes 25 climbs ranked Category 2 or higher of which 7 are Hors catégorie climbs, 6 Category 1 and 12 are Second Category.[10]

2016 Tour de France[edit]

The 2016 Tour de France includes 28 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.[11][12]

2017 Tour de France[edit]

The 2017 Tour de France includes 28 mountain passes or summit finishes, categorized HC, 1, or 2.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Augendre, Jacques (2010). Le Tour de France - Guide Historique (PDF) (in French). pp. 190–214. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  2. ^ "Tour summits 2009". LeTour.com. Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  3. ^ "Tour summits 2010". LeTour.com. Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  4. ^ "Tour summits 2011". LeTour.com. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  5. ^ "2012 Tour de France route officially presented". Retrieved 11 October 2011.
  6. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2012" (in French). ledicodutour. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  7. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2013" (in French). ledicodutour. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2014" (in French). ledicodutour. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  9. ^ "Tour de France 2014". ClimbByBike. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  10. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2015". ledicodutour (in French). Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  11. ^ Yost, Whit (27 May 2016). "What You Should Know About the Stages of the 2016 Tour de France". Bicycling.com. Rodale, Inc. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  12. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2016". ledicodutour (in French). Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  13. ^ "Les cols du Tour de France 2017". ledicodutour (in French). Retrieved 27 June 2018.