Ministry for National Security (Turkmenistan)

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Ministry for National Security
Türkmenistanyň Milli howpsuzlyk ministrilgi
Agency overview
FormedSeptember 20, 1991
Preceding agency
JurisdictionPresident of Turkmenistan
Government of Turkmenistan
Headquarters2033 Magtymguly Street, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan
Employeesclassified
Annual budgetclassified
Minister responsible
Parent departmentCommittee for National Security

The Ministry for National Security or MNB (Turkmen: Türkmenistanyň Milli howpsuzlyk ministrilgi) is the secret police agency for the government of Turkmenistan. It is composed largely of the remnants of KGB organs left over after the collapse of the Soviet Union; its functions remain largely the same as well. The MNB and the national police force are under the direction of the Ministry of Internal Affairs[1]

Until 2002 was known as the KNB (Committee for National Security).

History[edit]

The ministry was by President Saparmurat Niyazov established in September 1991 as the National Security Committee. It succeeded the Committee for State Security, or the KGB of the Turkmen SSR, which was the republican affiliate of the uniformed security agency of the USSR. Some units of the KNB were also former on the basis of a special purpose police unit of the Public Order Protection Directorate of the Interior Ministry of the Turkmen SSR. The MNB Institute was established to provide higher level training to its personnel [2] The Counter Terrorism Training Center of the MNB was also opened in the capital in October 2005 as a training institution. In December 2010, the MNB moved to its current headquarters on 2033 Magtymguly Street, Ashgabat.[3][4]

List of Ministers of National Security[edit]

  • Dangatar Kopekov - (March 1991 - January 1992)
  • Allashukur Ovezdzhev - (January 1992 - May 1992)
  • Saparmurad Seyidov - (May 1992 - February 1997)
  • Mohammed Nazarov - (April 1997 - March 2002)
  • Poran Berdyev - (May 2002 - September 2002)
  • Batyr Busakov - (September 2002 - November 2003)
  • Annageldy Gummanov - (November 2003 - December 2004)
  • Geldimuhammed Ashirmuhammedov - (December 2004 - October 2007)
  • Charymurad Amanov - (October 2007 - March 29, 2011)
  • Yaylym Berdiyev - (March 29, 2011 - October 5, 2015)
  • Guychgeldi Khojabberdiyev - (October 5, 2015 - March 1, 2016)
  • Dovrangeldi Bayramov - (March 1, 2016 - June 14, 2018)
  • Yaylym Berdiyev - (June 14, 2018 - Present)

Structure[edit]

  • 1st MNB Department
    • 1st Division
  • 2nd MNB Department
    • 1st Division
    • 2nd Division
    • 3rd Division
  • 4th MNB Department
    • 1st Division
    • 2nd Division
    • 3rd Division
  • Management Department
    • 1st Division
    • 2nd Division
    • 3rd Division
  • MNB Department for Ahal
  • MNB Department for Balkan
  • MNB Department for Dashoguz
  • MNB Department for Lebap
    • 11th Division
  • MNB Department for Mary
    • 1st Division
  • MNB Institute

Human Rights Concerns[edit]

Amnesty International has claimed that the MNB has persecuted Turkmens for their religious beliefs, and that only members of the Russian Orthodox Church and Sunni Muslims are tolerated.[5] Human Rights Watch has asserted that the KNB has repeatedly imprisoned and harassed political opponents. Both organizations cite the use of torture by KNB agents.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Curtis, Glen (1996-03-01). "Library of Congress Country Study: Turkmenistan". Library of Congress. Retrieved 2007-10-26.
  2. ^ turkmenportal. "Институт комитета национальной безопасности Туркменистана | ВУЗЫ". Туркменистан, интернет портал о культурной, деловой и развлекательной жизни в Туркменистане (in Russian). Retrieved 2019-06-19.
  3. ^ "Спецподразделения Туркменистана". sof-mag.ru. Retrieved 2019-06-19.
  4. ^ "Политическая роль военных/силовых структур / Туркмения / Политический Атлас Современности". www.hyno.ru. Retrieved 2019-06-19.
  5. ^ "Fear for safety; torture/ill-treatment" (PDF). Open letter to gov't officials in Turkmenistan (Press release). Amnesty International. 2000-12-05. Retrieved 2007-10-26.
  6. ^ "Human Rights Developments". Human Rights Watch. 1999. Archived from the original on 2007-10-11. Retrieved 2007-10-26.