The Muny Repertory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Muny, or the Municipal Opera Association of St. Louis, Missouri, in the United States, is a not-for-profit municipally-owned outdoor theatre, the largest in the United States. The Theater was built and opened in 1917 with 6 performances of Verdi's Aida. It operates solely in the summer, and its first official season ran from June to August 1919. In the beginning, it presented the latest operas of the time, calling on local performers and national celebrities alike to perform for a short run of a one to, on occasion, three week run. More recently, however, the Muny has shifted to presenting musicals, some old, some new, and some of the Muny's own creation.

Here follows a list of the many shows that the Muny has presented in its summer seasons, with known dates included. The Muny is currently in its 94th season (for the summer of 2012).

To date, the 1919 season is the only one to hold all new productions (being the first season). By contrast, the 1946 and 1993 seasons have been the only summers where no new shows were added to the repertory.

Contents

Legend[edit]

The superscript notes below denote first productions (premieres), world premieres, in-season concerts, etc. at the Muny.

Muny Premiere: MP
World Premiere at the Muny: WP
Concert Presentation: C
Ballet/Dance Event: B
Ice Show: I
Original Revue: R

1910s[edit]

1919 (Season 1)[edit]

^1 Featuring mayor Henry Kiel as King Richard

1920s[edit]

1920 (Season 2)[edit]

1921 (Season 3)[edit]

1922 (Season 4)[edit]

^22a Kalman's Der Zigeunerprimas.
^22b Reinhardt's Die Sprudelfee.
^22c Kalman's Zsuzsi kisasszony.

1923 (Season 5)[edit]

1924 (Season 6)[edit]

1925 (Season 7)[edit]

1926 (Season 8)[edit]

1927 (Season 9)[edit]

1928 (Season 10)[edit]

^2 This was the first production of the Verdi opera in a complete season. It had been previously performed in 1917 in the newly built amphitheater for the 13th Annual Convention of the St. Louis Advertising Club.

1929 (Season 11)[edit]

1930s[edit]

1930 (Season 12)[edit]

^3 Production starring W.C. Fields as Captain Andy.

1931 (Season 13)[edit]

^4 Film actor Cary Grant, appearing under his real name Archibald Leach, was a repertory performer during the 1931 season before starting his screen career. In addition to The Street Singer, Grant appeared in Music in May, Nina Rosa, The Three Musketeers, A Wonderful Night, Irene and Rio Rita.

1932 (Season 14)[edit]

1933 (Season 15)[edit]

1934 (Season 16)[edit]

1935 (Season 17)[edit]

1936 (Season 18)[edit]

1937 (Season 19)[edit]

1938 (Season 20)[edit]

^5 Production starring Red Skelton.

1939 (Season 21)[edit]

1940s[edit]

1940 (Season 22)[edit]

1941 (Season 23)[edit]

1942 (Season 24)[edit]

1943 (Season 25)[edit]

1944 (Season 26)[edit]

1945 (Season 27)[edit]

1946 (Season 28)[edit]

^6 New production for the Muny based on the 1939 MGM film; adapted by Frank Gabrielson.[1]

1947 (Season 29)[edit]

^7 Production featuring Marge Champion.

1948 (Season 30)[edit]

1949 (Season 31)[edit]

1950s[edit]

1950 (Season 32)[edit]

1951 (Season 33)[edit]

1952 (Season 34)[edit]

1953 (Season 35)[edit]

1954 (Season 36)[edit]

1955 (Season 37)[edit]

1956 (Season 38)[edit]

1957 (Season 39)[edit]

^8 Production featuring Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch.

1958 (Season 40)[edit]

1959 (Season 41)[edit]

1960s[edit]

1960 (Season 42)[edit]

1961 (Season 43)[edit]

1962 (Season 44)[edit]

  • June 11–24 (two weeks) Around the World in 80 Days MP 62a. Cyril Ritchard, Pierre Olaf.
  • June 25-July 1 Molly Darling MP
  • July 2–8 The Pajama Game. Dolores Gray, Stephen Douglass, Helen Gallagher.
  • July 9–15 Mexican Holidays MP
  • July 16–22 Bye Bye Birdie MP. Gretchen Wyler, Dick Patterson.
  • July 23–29 Annie Get Your Gun. Dolores Gray, Art Lund.
  • July 30-August 5 Blossom Time
  • August 6–12 Oklahoma!. Peter Palmer, Louise O'Brien.
  • August 13–19 The Wizard of Oz
  • August 20-September 2 (two weeks) The Music Man MP. Norwood Smith, Jacquelyn McKeever, Iggie Wolfington.

^62a This was not the 1946 Cole Porter musical as previously identified here, but a musical version of Jules Verne's story with music by Sammy Fain.

1963 (Season 45)[edit]

  • June 10–23 (two weeks). Carnival! MP. Susan Watson, Stephen Douglass, Edward Villella, James Mitchell, Jo Anne Worley.
  • June 24–30. I Dream of Jeanie MP
  • July 1–7. Li'l Abner. Bruce Yarnell, Virginia Gibson.
  • July 8–14. Brigadoon. Robert Horton.
  • July 15–21. The Unsinkable Molly Brown MP. Dolores Gray, Bruce Yarnell.
  • July 22–28. Babes in Toyland. Rowan & Martin.
  • July 29-August 4. The King and I. Betty White, Charles Korvin.
  • August 5–11. Gypsy MP. Evelyn Brooks, Alfred Sandor, Susan Watson 63a.
  • August 12–18. South Pacific. Giorgio Tozzi, Elizabeth Allen, Cliff Norton.
  • August 19-September 1. West Side Story MP. Lee Venora, David Holliday.

^63a Brooks and Watson were late substitutes for the originally cast Jacqueline James and Arlene Fontana.

1964 (Season 46)[edit]

  • June 8–21 (two weeks). My Fair Lady MP. Tom Helmore, Lola Fisher.
  • June 22–28. Show Boat. Andy Devine, Wynne Miller, Mary Wickes, William Lewis.
  • June 29-July 5. Mr. President MP. Forrest Tucker, Evelyn Brooks.
  • July 6–12. Carousel. Bruce Yarnell, Marcia King, Wynne Miller, Robert Rounseville, Claramae Turner.
  • July 13–19. Tom Sawyer
  • July 20–26. Milk and Honey MP. Molly Picon, Patricia Morison, Walter Cassel, Tommy Rall.
  • July 27-August 2. Damn Yankees. Eddie Bracken, Helen Gallagher.
  • August 3–9. The Boys from Syracuse MP. Mary McCarty.
  • August 10–16. Porgy and Bess MP. Cab Calloway.
  • August 17-September 6 (three weeks). The Sound of Music MP. Wynne Miller, Shev Rodgers, Claramae Turner.64a

^64a This was one of only two shows to be booked for three weeks at the Muny, Camelot the next season being the other. Wynne Miller was a late substitute for the originally cast Barbara Cook.

1965 (Season 47)[edit]

  • June 7–20 (two weeks). Meet Me in St. Louis. Anita Gillette, Mary Wickes.
  • June 21–27. Guys and Dolls. Macdonald Carey, Patrice Wymore, Joey Faye, Wynne Miller.
  • June 28-July 4. Here's Love MP. Marion Marlowe, Jack Haskell, Jack Harrold.
  • July 5–11. 110 in the Shade MP. Gretchen Wyler, Bruce Yarnell, Art Lund.
  • July 12–18. Little Me MP. Donald O'Connor, Virginia Martin, Nancy Andrews.
  • July 19–25. Cinderella. William Lewis, Judith McCauley.
  • July 26-August 1. The Student Prince. William Lewis, Patricia Welting.
  • August 2–8. High Button Shoes. Paul Gilbert, Marge Champion, Russell Arms.
  • August 9–15. Flower Drum Song. Jack Soo.
  • August 16-September 5 (three weeks). Camelot MP. Pernell Roberts, Margot Moser, Bruce Yarnell.

1966 (Season 48)[edit]

1967 (Season 49)[edit]

No show July 31.
Special Added Attraction: The Royal Ballet, featuring Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn

Regular Season continues:

^67a Van Johnson was originally set to star as Dr. Mark Bruckner but dropped out.

1968 (Season 50)[edit]

Special Attractions to Celebrate the Muny's 50th Season:

The Regular Season continues:

^68a Constance Towers was cast as the Merry Widow but dropped out shortly before rehearsals.
^68b Featuring 19-year-old Vicki Lawrence as Carrie Pipperidge.
^68c The Broadway production closed for a week to play this special engagement.

1969 (Season 51)[edit]

^69a Reorchestrated as a "rock" musical for a "contemporary" sound. Well, it was the late '60s. Things were strange.

1970s[edit]

1970 (Season 52)[edit]

Pre-Season Concerts

The Regular Season

No show August 31.

  • September 1–6. The Moiseyev Dance Company B

^70a The Broadway production closed for a week to play this engagement.
^70b Perhaps the only time in history the part of Ali Hakim received solo above the title billing.

1971 (Season 53)[edit]

Special Preseason Engagement

Regular Season

A week of concerts, July 12–18:

Regular Season continues:

  • July 19–25 Sweet Charity MP. Juliet Prowse.
  • July 26-August 1. The Music Man. Peter Marshall, Jack Bailey, Mary Wickes, Jackie Coogan, Cass Daley.
  • August 2–8. Two by Two MP. Milton Berle.
  • August 9–15. The Unsinkable Molly Brown. Barbara Eden, Jerry Lanning.
  • August 16–22. Cabaret MP. Joel Grey.
  • August 23–29. The King and I. Roberta Peters, Jack Shigeta.
  • August 30-September 5. This Is Show Business MP. Betty Grable, Dorothy Lamour, Don Ameche, Dennis Day, Rudy Vallee, Chita Rivera.

^71a The Broadway production closed for a week for this engagement.

1972 (Season 54)[edit]

  • July 3–9. Follies MP 72a. Alexis Smith, Gene Nelson, Dorothy Collins, John McMartin, Yvonne De Carlo.

A week of concerts, not considered part of the regular season.

No show on July 17.

  • July 18–23. Ukrainian Dance Company B
  • July 24–30. 1776 MP. William Daniels, Howard Da Silva, Jerry Lanning.
  • July 31-August 6. The Liza Minnelli Show C
  • August 7–13. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  • August 14–20. Anything Goes. Ann Miller, Pat Paulsen.
  • August 21–27. The Student Prince. Frank Porretta, Hans Conried, Mary Wickes.
  • August 28-September 3. The Sound of Music. Jane Powell, Joseph Campanella.

^72a This was the Broadway production which had closed the week before. The week at the Muny preceded engagements in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

1973 (Season 55)[edit]

Pre-Season Special

The Regular Season

^73a The Broadway production closed for a week to play this Muny engagement.
^73b Pre-Broadway tour.

1974 (Season 56)[edit]

^74a The Broadway production closed for a week to play this engagement.
^73b Pre-Broadway tour.

1975 (Season 57)[edit]

^75a This was the only time in its history the Muny presented a nonmusical play.

1976 (Season 58)[edit]

Muny Salutes '76, a series of preseason concerts for the Bicentennial of the United States

The Regular Season

  • July 5–11. Fiddler on the Roof. Zero Mostel.
  • July 12–18. Mame. Angela Lansbury, Anne Francine, Jane Connell.
  • July 19–25. On the Town. The Hudson Brothers.
  • July 26-August 1. Show Boat. Shirley Jones, Gale Gordon, Ron Husmann, Kelly Garrett.
  • August 2–8. The King and I. Yul Brynner, Constance Towers.
  • August 9–15. Oliver!. Vincent Price.
  • August 16–22. The Baker's Wife MP 76a. Topol, Patti LuPone, Kurt Peterson, Keene Curtis.
  • August 23–29. Russian Festival of Music and Dance C B
  • August 30-September 5. 1776. Peter Graves, Howard Da Silva.

^76a Pre-Broadway tryout (although the show closed before it ever got to Broadway).

1977 (Season 59)[edit]

^77a The Broadway production was scheduled to close for one week for this engagement then return to Broadway. As it turned out, the Broadway show closed the Saturday before the Muny engagement, August 27, 1977.

1978 (Season 60)[edit]

^78a National touring company.

1979 (Season 61)[edit]

  • June 25-July 1. My Fair Lady. David Birney, Anita Gillette, Milo O'Shea.
  • July 2-8. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum MP. Arte Johnson, Hans Conried, Avery Schreiber, John Carradine, Benny Baker.
  • July 9-15. Shenandoah MP. Ed Ames.
  • July 16-22. Brigadoon. John McCook, Victoria Mallory.
  • July 23-29. The Desert Song. Ann Blyth, Richard Fredricks, Alan Sues.
  • July 30-August 5. Carousel. Robert Goulet.
  • August 6-12. Tom Sawyer. Don Grady79a, William Lonsdale Hurst.
  • August 13-19. Sugar MP. Robert Morse, Ken Berry, Donald O'Connor.
  • August 20-26. Ballroom MP. Janis Paige, Forrest Tucker.
  • August 27-September 2. Bells Are Ringing. Florence Henderson, Dean Jones.

^79a Don Grady, age 35(!), played Huckleberry Finn.

1980s[edit]

1980 (Season 62)[edit]

Preseason Special Attraction

  • Richard Rodgers in Concert C. With Walter Cronkite and Marsha Mason as narrators.

Regular Season:

  • June 23-29. South Pacific. Florence Henderson, Giorgio Tozzi.
  • June 30-July 6. The Debbie Reynolds Show C
  • July 7-13. Carnival! Robert Conrad, Marti Rolph, Swen Swenson.
  • July 14-20. Bye Bye Birdie. Chita Rivera, Russ Tamblyn, Audrey Christie.
  • July 21-27. Little Me. Donald O'Connor, Eve Arden.
  • July 28-August 3. Li'l Abner. Joe Namath.
  • August 4-10. Cinderella
  • August 11-17. Al Jolson Tonight! MP80a Larry Kert.
  • August 18-24. The Merry Widow. Roberta Peters, Ron Husmann.
  • August 25-September 7 (two weeks). Sugar Babies MP. Carol Channing, Robert Morse.

^80a Presented as a pre-Broadway tryout tour, but it never made it to Broadway.

1981 (Season 63)[edit]

^81a Pat Suzuki, 23 years earlier the original Broadway Linda Low, was cast here as Madam Liang.
^81b Not, as the title might imply, an evening of Rodgers and Hammerstein, but a concert of opera and operetta scenes and arias, including the entire second act of Die Fledermaus.

1982 (Season 64)[edit]

^82a A touring production of Hello, Dolly! was originally scheduled to close the season, but it closed earlier in the summer. The touring A Chorus Line was substituted, thus being presented for an almost unprecedented two summers in a row.

1983 (Season 65)[edit]

1984 (Season 66)[edit]

^84a This was not the Tchaikovsky ballet, as previously designated here, but a new stage musical version of the classic fairy tale. The score was a kind of mishmash of various things, including some Tchaikovsky, for instance, his Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker.
^84b This was the shortest Muny season since the opening seasons over sixty years earlier. The original intention was to close the season with the touring production of My One and Only, to play the Fox Theater instead of the Muny, but the engagement was cancelled.

1985 (Season 67)[edit]

1986 (Season 68)[edit]

^86a Since 42nd Street closed the previous season and opened this one, it's the only time in Muny history that season ticket holders sat through the same show in consecutive bookings.
^86b The MGM movie classic starred Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds, all of whom appeared at the Muny in the 1970s.
^86c In Franco Zeffirelli's production.

1987 (Season 69)[edit]

^87a My One and Only was based on the Gershwin musical Funny Face which originally starred Fred Astaire on Broadway in 1927 and in a musical movie of the same name in 1957. This Muny presentation opened the day Fred Astaire died ... and it was rained out; a bad day all around.
^87b For the second show in a row, the opening night, which was a sellout, was rained out.

1988 (Season 70)[edit]

1989 (Season 71)[edit]

1990s[edit]

1990 (Season 72)[edit]

1991 (Season 73)[edit]

^35 Production featuring Jeanne Trevor.

1992 (Season 74)[edit]

^36 Production featuring Joel Grey and Gretchen Wyler.

1993 (Season 75)[edit]

1994 (Season 76)[edit]

1995 (Season 77)[edit]

^37 Production featuring a concert staging of The Merry Widow.

1996 (Season 78)[edit]

^46 Adaptation of the fairy tale by executive producer Paul Blake utilizing songs by Sammy Cahn.

1997 (Season 79)[edit]

^38 World Premiere adaptation of the 1953 film.
^39 Production featuring original direction and choreography recreated by Mitzi Hamilton.

1998 (Season 80)[edit]

^40 Special 80th Season Revue featuring the Radio City Rockettes.
^41 Pre-Broadway tour featuring Cathy Rigby in the title role.
^42 Production featuring Bruce Adler as Bela Zangler, a role he originated in the original Broadway company.

1999 (Season 81)[edit]

^43 Revue written by executive producer Paul Blake compiling the many works of British songwriters such as Andrew Lloyd Webber and Lionel Bart.
^44 Production featuring Karen Morrow as Reno Sweeney and Bruce Adler as Moonface Martin.

2000s[edit]

2000 (Season 82)[edit]

^47 Revue written by executive producer Paul Blake compiling the many works of composer Richard Rodgers.
^48 World Premiere of the stage adaptation of Irving Berlin's classic film, directed and produced by Paul Blake.
^49 Production featuring Michael McGrath as Pseudolus and Bruce Adler as Hysterium.

2001 (Season 83)[edit]

^50 World Premiere of the stage adaptation of the film, directed and produced by Paul Blake.
^51 Production featuring Ozzie Smith in the title role.
^52 Revue written by executive producer Paul Blake compiling the many works of songwriters George and Ira Gershwin.

2002 (Season 84)[edit]

^53 Production with original direction and choreography recreated by Mitzi Hamilton.
^54 Revue written by executive producer Paul Blake compiling songs from numerous films.
^55 Production featuring Michael McGrath as J. Pierrepont Finch and Karen Morrow as Smitty.
^56 Production directed by Thommie Walsh and choreographed by Liza Gennaro.
^57 Production featuring Nat Chandler as Lancelot, Kim Crosby as Guenevere, and Joneal Joplin as Merlyn.
^58 Production featuring Eric Kunze as Joseph and Judy McLane as the Narrator.

2003 (Season 85)[edit]

2004 (Season 86)[edit]

2005 (Season 87)[edit]

2006 (Season 88)[edit]

2007 (Season 89)[edit]

2008 (Season 90)[edit]

2009 (Season 91)[edit]

  • 42nd Street (Featuring Shannon O'Bryan as Peggy Sawyer, David Elder as Billy Lawler, Bob Cuccioli as Julian Marsh, Dee Hoty as Dorothy Brock and Nikki Snelson as Anytime Annie)
  • Annie (Featuring Abigail Isom as Annie, John Schuck as Daddy Warbucks, Beth Leavel as Miss Hannigan, Christianne Tisdale as Grace, Jim Newman as Rooster, and Stacey Logan as Lily)
  • Meet Me in St. Louis (Featuring Brynn O'Malley as Esther Smith, Rob Sapp as Lon Smith, Max Von Essen as John Truitt, Lewis J. Stadlen as Grandfather, Stephen Bogardus as Mr. Smith, Leslie Denniston as Mrs. Smith, Berklea Going as Agnes and Elizabeth Teeter as Tootie)
  • Godspell (Featuring Eric Kunze as Jesus)
  • The Music Man (Featuring Jim Clow as Harold Hill, Kate Baldwin as Marian Paroo, Jeb Brown as Marcellus, Georgia Engel as Mrs. Paroo, Drew Humpfrey as Tommy Djilas, James Anthony as Mayor Shinn, Donna English as Eualie Shinn and Parker Donovan as Winthrop. )
  • Camelot (Featuring Jeff McCarthy as Arthur, Jenny Powers as Guinevere and Lewis Cleale as Lancelot)
  • Hairspray MP (Featuring Joline Mujica as Tracy Turnblad, Paul Vogt as Edna Turnblad, Lara Teeter as Wilbur Turnblad, Charlotte Crossley as Motormouth Maybelle, Ashley Spencer as Amber Von Tussle, Meggie Cansler as Penny Pingleton, Constantine Rousouli as Link Larkin and Christian White as Seaweed Stubbs)

2010s[edit]

2010 (Season 92)[edit]

  • Beauty and the Beast (featuring Jim Clow as the Beast, Sarah Darling as Belle, Ken Page as Maurice, Jeb Brown as Cogsworth, Lara Teeter as Lumiere, Leslie Denniston as Mrs. Potts, Robb Sapp as Lefou, Nicholas Rodriguez as Gaston, Meg Gillentine as Babette, Abigail Friedmann as Chip and Gaelen Gilliland as Madame de la Grand Bouche and the kids getting to be in only one scene.)
  • Titanic MP (featuring Telly Leung as Harold Bride, Henry Stram as Henry Etches, Michele Ragusa as Alice Beane, Jessica Grové as Kate McGowen, Justin Scott Brown as Jim Farrell, Ron Raines as Isidor Strauss, William Youmans as J. Bruce Ismay and Tom Hewitt as Thomas Andrews)
  • Damn Yankees (featuring Lewis J. Stadlen as Mr. Applegate, Angie Schworer as Lola, Walter Charles as Joe Boyd, Eric Kunze as Joe Hardy and Linda Mugleston as Meg)
  • Cats (featuring Stephanie J. Block as Grizabella)
  • The Sound of Music (Featuring Ashley Brown as Maria.)
  • Footloose MP (featuring Curtis Holbrook as Ren McCormack, Meggie Cansler as Ariel Moore, Jeff McCarthy as Rev. Moore and Dee Hoty as Vi Moore)
  • Show Boat (Featuring Kelsey Knee as Kim.)

2011 (Season 93)[edit]

  • June 20-26. Legally Blonde MP . Lauren Ashley Zakrin as Elle Woods, DB Bonds as Emmett, Lisa Howard as Paulette and Matthew Hydzik as Warner.
  • June 27-July 3. Kiss Me, Kate. Lisa Vroman as Lilli/Kate and Tom Hewitt as Fred/Petruchio.
  • July 6-14 (nine nights). The Little Mermaid MP 11a. Patti Murin as Ariel, Paul Vogt as Ursula, Francis Jue as Sebastian, Lara Teeter as Scuttle and Ken Page as King Triton.
  • July 18-24. Singin' in the Rain. Tony Yazbeck as Don, Curtis Holbrook as Cosomo, Shannon M. O'Bryan as Kathy and Michele Ragusa as Lina.
  • July 25-31. Little Shop of Horrors. Rob McClure as Seymour, Alli Mauzey as Audrey and Clarke Thorell as Orin.
  • August 1-7. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Jim Clow as Adam and Jenny Powers as Millie.
  • August 8-14. Bye Bye Birdie. Lara Teeter as Albert Peterson and Andrea Burns as Rose Alvarez.

^11a Instead of the usual Monday-Sunday run, The Little Mermaid ran from Wednesday through Thursday of the following week.

2012 (Season 94)[edit]

^12a When Chicago was presented in 1977, it was the Broadway production which had just closed in New York. This production was billed as the "Muny production premiere."
^12b Instead of the normal Monday-Sunday run, Aladdin ran from Thursday through Friday of the following week. This was only the third production of the stage version of Aladdin anywhere in the world.
^12c A version of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance.

2013 (Season 95)[edit]

^13a Instead of the usual Monday-Sunday run, Mary Poppins ran from Thursday to Friday of the following week.

2014 (Season 96)[edit]

^14a Eight nights, Wednesday through Wednesday.
^14b Tuesday through Monday.
^14c Nine nights, Thursday through Friday.

Sources[edit]

  • The Muny 1993 75th Season Souvenir Program
  • Muny archival records
  • www.muny.org

Coordinates: 38°38′25″N 90°16′49″W / 38.6402°N 90.2802°W / 38.6402; -90.2802

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wizard of Oz Tams-Whitmark Library Website.