January 1932

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The following events occurred in January 1932:

January 1, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

January 2, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Japanese forces in Manchuria captured Jinzhou.[2]
  • Two trains on the Kazan line near Moscow collided, killing 68 and injuring 131. The Soviet government initially suppressed news of the disaster.[3]
  • The shootout known as the Young Brothers Massacre occurred outside of Brookline, Missouri. The criminal family of Paul, Harry and Jennings Young gunned down six law enforcement officials who had gone to the family farm to arrest them for trying to sell a stolen car.[4]
  • Born: Jean Little, Canadian author, in Taiwan

January 3, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

January 4, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

January 5, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 6, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 7, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The U.S. government enunciated the Stimson Doctrine, telling Japan that it would not recognize Manchuria as Japanese territory.[12]
  • German Chancellor Heinrich Brüning asked Adolf Hitler to support a one-year extension of the presidential term of Paul von Hindenburg. The term was set to expire in May but Brüning wanted to save the country from the turmoil of a presidential election.[13]
  • Died: André Maginot, 54, French soldier and politician
  • Died: Sir Mian Muhammad Shafi K.C.S.I, 62, of the prominent Arain Mian family of Baghbanpura, Lahore

January 8, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • Sakuradamon Incident: Emperor Hirohito survived an assassination attempt when a bomb was thrown at his carriage. The assailant was identified as Korean independence activist Lee Bong-chang.[14]
  • Ailing French Foreign Minister Aristide Briand announced he was stepping down and retiring from politics.[15]
  • Navy Lieutenant Thomas H. Massie and socialite Grace Fortescue were arrested and charged with first degree murder in the death of Joe Kahahawai, a boxer who had been tried in the rape of Massie's wife in a case that ended in a hung jury. The murder led to the criminal case known as the Massie Trial.[16][17]
  • Died: Eurosia Fabris, 65, Italian beatified Catholic; Joseph Kahahawai, 22, Native Hawaiian boxer (murdered)

January 9, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • German Chancellor Heinrich Brüning announced that Germany would refuse to pay any more reparations, saying the present economic situation made it "impossible".[18]
  • The comedy film This Reckless Age starring Charles "Buddy" Rogers was released.
  • The RCMP arrived at Albert Johnson's cabin and surrounded it, ordering him to give himself up. Johnson never spoke a word but opened fire from holes in the cabin walls when officers approached, and a standoff began.[9]

January 10, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald tried to prevent the cancellation or postponement of the Lausanne Conference on German reparations scheduled to open on January 25, saying it was "even more necessary than ever".[19]
  • 28 were injured in Karachi when police charged a crowd of independence demonstrators.[20]
  • More Hawaiians turned out for the funeral of murdered boxer Joseph Kahahawai than for any funeral since Liliuokalani, last queen of Hawaii, in 1917.[17]
  • The RCMP dynamited Albert Johnson's cabin. Unsure if Johnson was still alive, a flashlight tied to a stick was shone in the doorway. When gunfire shot out the flashlight, the police officers recognized that they were short on supplies and decided to return to Aklavik.[9]

January 11, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

  • Adolf Hitler and Alfred Hugenberg informed Chancellor Brüning that they would not agree to the proposed one-year extension of Hindenburg's presidential term.[21]
  • The Indian government issued an emergency decree forbidding all meetings of groups consisting of more than five people.[22]
  • Born: Takkō Ishimori, voice actor, in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan (d. 2013)

January 12, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The cabinet of Pierre Laval resigned In France, throwing the Lausanne Conference into even more uncertainty.[23]
  • Bulgaria joined Germany in declaring that it, too, was unable to pay any more reparations.[24]

January 13, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 14, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

January 15, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

January 16, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Reichstag member Hermann Göring presented an ultimatum on behalf of Hitler and the entire Nazi Party to Chancellor Brüning, saying that they would withdraw their opposition to the extension of Hindenburg's presidential term if Brüning would resign.[27]
  • Hitler was acquitted in Berlin court of a charge of libel brought against him by Walter Stennes, but Der Angriff editor Julius Lippert was ordered to pay a fine of 300 marks for accusing Stennes of being a police spy.[27][28]
  • The ruins of Albert Johnson's cabin were found deserted. An Arctic manhunt for the "Mad Trapper" was now on.[9]
  • Born: Dian Fossey, zoologist, in San Francisco, California (d. 1985)

January 17, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The Soviet government finally released information about the January 2 train disaster after wild rumors exaggerating the death toll became too widespread to ignore. Eleven rail workers stood accused of criminal negligence.[3]
  • The Bertolt Brecht play The Mother, based on the Maxim Gorky 1906 novel of the same name, premiered at the Komödienhaus am Schiffbauerdamm in Berlin.[29]
  • Born: Sheree North, actress, dancer and singer, in Los Angeles (d. 2005)

January 18, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

January 19, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 20, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 21, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

January 22, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

January 23, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

January 24, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • A prison riot broke out at HM Prison Dartmoor in England. 100 convicts gained control of the prison, setting the administrative block on fire and destroying prison records. Prisoners also tried to scale the walls, although no one escaped. Police were called in and the riot was put down within two hours. A total of about 20 people were hospitalized with injuries.[42]
  • Spain dissolved the country's Jesuit order and commanded all of its members to leave the country within ten days.[43]
  • Died: Sir Alfred Yarrow, 90, British shipbuilder

January 25, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

January 26, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The British submarine HMS M2 sank near the Isle of Portland with the loss of all 60 crew.[47]
  • Adolf Hitler gave a famous speech to the Düsseldorf Industry Club assuring the country's business leaders that they had nothing to fear from a Nazi regime, as he stressed his belief in the importance of private property and the rewarding of enterprise.[48][49]
  • Seven of the eleven rail workers in the January 2 Soviet train disaster were found guilty of negligence and given varying prison terms of up to ten years.[3]
  • Born: Coxsone Dodd, record producer, in Kingston, Jamaica (d. 2004)
  • Died: Edward Stinson, 38, American pilot and aircraft manufacturer (injuries from plane crash landing); William Wrigley, Jr., 70, American chewing gum industrialist and owner of the Chicago Cubs baseball team

January 27, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 28, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

January 29, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

January 30, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Chiang Kai-shek sent a telegram to China's military commanders instructing them to prepare to defend China and "to fight for her national existence."[52]
  • The four defendants in the Massie murder case were released on bail.[53]
  • Prohibition ended in Finland.[25]
  • The posse hunting Albert Johnson caught up to him and engaged in a shootout. Johnson killed an officer and escaped again.[9]
  • Born: Kazuo Inamori, businessman and philanthropist, in Kagoshima, Japan; Knock Yokoyama, comedian and politician, in Kobe, Japan (d. 2007)
  • Died: William Hodge, 57, American stage actor

January 31, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The United States and Great Britain ordered warships to Shanghai to protect citizens of their respective countries living there.[26][54][55]
  • Died: Enrico Butti, 84, Italian sculptor

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gandhi Packs His Loin Cloths; Prepares to Go to Prison". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 2, 1932. p. 5. 
  2. ^ Powell, John (January 3, 1932). "Japan Extends Occupation to "Gate of China"". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6. 
  3. ^ a b c Haine, Edgar A. (1994). Railroad Wrecks. Cornwall Books. pp. 184–185. ISBN 978-0-8453-4844-4. 
  4. ^ "Young Brothers Massacre of January 2, 1932". National Law Enforcement Museum. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Missouri Gang Sighted Twice, but Get Away". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 4, 1932. p. 1. 
  6. ^ a b "Gandhi's Aide Gets 2 Years; Jail Mahatma". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 4, 1932. p. 1. 
  7. ^ Herrick, Genevieve Forbes (January 3, 1932). "U.S. Will Open Biggest Office Home in World". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8. 
  8. ^ Clines, Francis X., and Phil Gailey. "Briefing." The New York Times. December 28, 1981.
  9. ^ a b c d e Smith, Barbara (2009). The Mad Trapper: Unearthing a Mystery. Heritage House. ISBN 978-1-927051-08-5. 
  10. ^ "Slayers of Six Kill Each Other when Cornered". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 6, 1932. p. 3. 
  11. ^ "Tageseinträge für 5. Januar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Warns Japan". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1932. p. 1. 
  13. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 8, 1932). "Hitler Sits in Judgement on von Hindenburg". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4. 
  14. ^ "Japan's Ruler Bomb Target". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1932. p. 1. 
  15. ^ Taylor, Edmond (January 9, 1932). "Briand Quits; French Cabinet Also Is Expected to Resign". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  16. ^ Gessler, Clifford (January 9, 1932). "Rape Suspect Slain; Nab Naval Officer". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  17. ^ a b "The Massie Trials: A Chronology". UMKC School of Law. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  18. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 10, 1932). "We'll Pay No More: Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  19. ^ Steele, John (January 11, 1932). "Europe Debates Berlin Plea". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  20. ^ "Crowd Snatches Prisoners from Police in India". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 11, 1932. p. 8. 
  21. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 12, 1932). "Hitler Blocks Bruening's Coup to Extend Hindenburg's Term". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10. 
  22. ^ "British Outlaw all Gatherings of India Rebels". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 12, 1932. p. 10. 
  23. ^ Taylor, Edmond (January 13, 1932). "Laval Cabinet Quits; Forced Out by Briand". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  24. ^ Shirer, William (January 13, 1932). "War Payments are Repudiated by Bulgarians". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  25. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 410. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  26. ^ a b c d e "1932". Music And History. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  27. ^ a b Schultz, Sigrid (January 17, 1932). "Hitler Demands Bruening's Head in Ballot Fight". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  28. ^ "Acquit Hitler of Libel Charge". Urbana Daily Courier. Urbana, Illinois: 2. January 16, 1932. 
  29. ^ Calico, Joy Haslam (2008). Brecht at the Opera. University of California Press. p. 55. ISBN 978-0-520-94281-3. 
  30. ^ "Reds Fight Hitlerites Near Berlin; 2 Killed, 7 Injured". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 19, 1932. p. 2. 
  31. ^ "Worst Floods in Thirty Years Sweep Ireland". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 20, 1932. p. 3. 
  32. ^ "14 Accepted on Tentative Jury for Judd Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 20, 1932. p. 3. 
  33. ^ "Europe Calls Off Parley on Reparations". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 21, 1932. p. 3. 
  34. ^ "Air Transport – Report on Civil Aviation". Flight: 687. July 22, 1932. 
  35. ^ "Japanese Diet is Dissolved; Issue to People". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 21, 1932. p. 1. 
  36. ^ "Tageseinträge für 21. Januar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  37. ^ "The Fuego Volcanic Eruption". FindTheData. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  38. ^ University of California, San Diego (2001). "El Salvador elections and events 1902–1932". Archived from the original on May 21, 2008. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  39. ^ "Tageseinträge für 22. Januar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  40. ^ Homes, Thomas (January 23, 1932). "Brooklyn Baseball Club Will Officially Nickname Them 'Dodgers'". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. p. 14. 
  41. ^ "Gov. Roosevent Formally Says He's Candidate". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1932. p. 1. 
  42. ^ a b "The Dartmoor Prison Mutiny". The Barrier Miner. Broken Hill: 1. March 18, 1932. 
  43. ^ "Tageseinträge für 23. Januar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  44. ^ "Chronology 1932". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  45. ^ "Welsh Coal Mines". Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  46. ^ "Troops Encircle British Prison; New Riot Feared". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 26, 1932. p. 10. 
  47. ^ "Wreck Tour: 5, The M2". Divernet. Archived from the original on May 28, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  48. ^ Fest, Joachim C. (1974). Hitler. Harvest. p. 306. ISBN 978-0-544-19554-7. 
  49. ^ Evans, Richard J. (2003). The Coming of the Third Reich. Penguin Books. p. 245. ISBN 978-0-14-303469-8. 
  50. ^ "Prince of Wales Speaks; Shouted Down by Women". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 28, 1932. p. 3. 
  51. ^ Laughlin, Charles A. (2008). The Literature of Leisure and Chinese Modernity. University of Hawai'i Press. p. 89. ISBN 978-0-8248-3125-7. 
  52. ^ "China Votes to Declare War". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 30, 1932. p. 1. 
  53. ^ Kinsley, Philip (January 31, 1932). "Hawaii Murder Suspects Freed on Bail". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16. 
  54. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (February 1, 1932). "Hold Up Japan Army Orders". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  55. ^ Steele, John (February 1, 1932). "British Land and Sea Forces Are Ordered to Shanghai". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3.