Media Molecule

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Media Molecule Ltd.
Subsidiary
IndustryVideo games
PredecessorLionhead Studios
Founded4 January 2006; 14 years ago (2006-01-04)[5]
Founders
Headquarters,
England
Key people
  • Mark Healey (creative director)
  • Kareem Ettouney (art director)
  • Alex Evans (technical director)
  • David Smith (technical director)
  • Siobhan Reddy (studio director)
Products
Financial data
RevenueDecrease£10.5 million[6] (2019)
Decrease£1.1 million[6] (2019)
Decrease£1.1 million[6] (2019)
Total assetsIncrease£71.2 million[6] (2019)
Total equityIncrease£36.0 million[6] (2019)
Number of employees
~50[7]
ParentSIE Worldwide Studios (2010–present)
Websitemediamolecule.com

Media Molecule Ltd. is a British video game developer based in Guildford, Surrey. It was founded in 2006 by Mark Healey, Alex Evans, David Smith, and Kareem Ettouney;[a] It was acquired by Sony Computer Entertainment in 2010, becoming a part of SIE Worldwide Studios. The company is best-known for developing the LittleBigPlanet series, 2013's Tearaway, and 2020's Dreams for PlayStation consoles.

Before the company's formation, the co-founders, led by Healey, developed Rag Doll Kung Fu, whilst working at Lionhead Studios. They left Lionhead in 2005 and presented an early precursor of LittleBigPlanet to Sony. Sony was interested, so in January 2006 they secured their funding from Sony for six months and Media Molecule was incorporated. The studio signed a deal with Sony Computer Entertainment Europe in June which allowed Media Molecule to create LittleBigPlanet for the PlayStation 3, with Sony owning the intellectual property. Soon after, LittleBigPlanet started production; it was released in October 2008 to critical acclaim. Sony acquired Media Molecule for an undisclosed sum two years later.

In 2011, the developer released a sequel, LittleBigPlanet 2. LittleBigPlanet spawned a series of games developed by other studios often in collaboration with Media Molecule. The studio has developed 2013's Tearaway in addition to its extended remake, Tearaway Unfolded. In 2016, they opened a small studio in Brighton, East Sussex. Dreams was released in February 2020. The studio has won numerous awards including Studio of the Year from the 2008 Spike Video Game Awards. Media Molecule's philosophy is to have as few employees as achievable.

History[edit]

Background (2005–2006)[edit]

A bald middle-aged man looking towards something to the left of the camera
Alex Evans
A middle-aged man with a ponytail looking towards something to the left of the camera
Kareem Ettouney
Evans, Ettouney, Healey, and David Smith (not pictured) founded Media Molecule

Media Molecule was founded by four former Lionhead Studios' employees—Alex Evans, Kareem Ettouney, Mark Healey, and David Smith—being incorporated on 4 January 2006.[5][8][9][10] Chris Lee and Mags Hardwick are also among the founding team.[8][a] Evans and Smith are the technical directors;[22][26] Healey is the creative director whilst Ettouney is the art director.[26][27]

Before the founding of Media Molecule, Evans and Healey worked at Bullfrog Productions, working for its co-founder, Peter Molyneux.[26][28][29] Molyneux later went on to co-found Lionhead Studios, with Evans and Healey being some of their first employees.[29][30] Soon after, the co-founders, led primarily by Healey, developed Rag Doll Kung Fu in their spare time whilst working at Lionhead Studios.[11][14][26] Healey demonstrated the game at Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2005 and Valve employees were in the audience.[31][32] Valve was interested in the game, they were looking for a "low risk, low cost" third-party game to test on Steam; it became the first non-Valve game to be released on the platform in October 2005.[31][32][33]

Also in 2005 whilst at Lionhead, the co-founders were working a game called The Room using clay tubes and portals.[17][31][34] In retrospect, the founders noted it had similarities 2007's Portal.[35] They presented a demonstration of it at GDC 2005; the same GDC they presented Rag Doll Kung Fu.[17][31][34] The founders met with Valve who were interested in hiring them to develop The Room or another game idea, but nothing came of it.[17][35] Evans noted if they had Portal may not have been developed.[35][31][34] The founders left Lionhead Studios in December 2005 and managed to get a meeting with Sony Computer Entertainment (SCE) regarding a game idea.[11][8]

LittleBigPlanet, formation, and Sony deal (2006–2008)[edit]

Harrison was described by Evans as "completely key and pivotal" to LittleBigPlanet's early days.[36] Reddy is the studio director at Media Molecule

They pitched an early precursor of what LittleBigPlanet was to become dubbed Craftworld to Phil Harrison, the head of development for Sony Worldwide Studios at the time.[11][17][18][37][38] Craftworld was a physics-based 2D side-scrolling game similar to LittleBigPlanet. Its main character was 'Mr. Yellowhead', which would later become Sackboy.[8][37][39] Evans stated that pitch was "meant to be a 30-minute pitch for our idea for a game called Craftworld that soon turned into a three-hour brainstorming session" and described the pitch as "pretty vague".[11][17] Despite this Sony were interested, partly due to Harrison's enthusiasm for the game, according to Smith.[37][40] In January 2006, they secured their funding from Sony for six months, they started to set up their office, Media Molecule was incorporated, and they started pre-production of the game.[5][11][17][8] Evans described the company's formation as a combination of the boost from Rag Doll Kung Fu, some new ideas bubbling in his head, and the new wave of consoles around the corner.[14] In March, they moved into a studio in Guildford, Surrey; around this time Siobhan Reddy, the studio director, joined Media Molecule.[12] Reddy is occasionally regarded as the fifth co-founder.[23][24]

On 1 June 2006, Media Molecule announced they signed an exclusive deal with SCE.[13][41][42] This agreement allowed Media Molecule to create an original game exclusively for the PlayStation 3.[13][14][10][41][42] The deal included SCE owning the intellectual property and the exclusivity of LittleBigPlanet on PlayStation consoles (meaning that LittleBigPlanet will only be released on PlayStation consoles).[38] Evans stated "SCEE have proven to be the perfect partner for us. They immediately understood both our ambition for the game as well as our development style."[13][41][42] Pre-production was extended up until August where they had a subsequent meeting with Sony executives, including Harrison, to decide whether to greenlight the game's production.[43] Harrison described the pitch for production as the best meeting he ever had and went on to start full development.[43] In 2019, Harrison reaffirmed this sentiment citing Evan's different approach this being instead of using PowerPoint, he wrote his own interactive 'PowerPoint' so that the game was playable through the presentation.[44] Harrison stated that this demonstrated their innovative thinking and the way they wanted to challenge conventions impressed him.[44]

The green-light meeting in August: I would summarise it by saying in my career I've probably seen close to 1000 game pitches. This is the best meeting I have ever had. It was the best presentation of a vision executed perfectly, which was fun, which was playable, and showed the potential of where this could go. I must admit I floated out of that meeting room thinking that this was just the most fantastic opportunity that was in front of us.

Phil Harrison, describing the LittleBigPlanet's green-light meeting in August 2006.[43]

LittleBigPlanet was announced by Phil Harrison in his keynote at Game Developers Conference on 7 March 2007 in San Francisco;[8] only upon arrival did Healey and others realise they were a part of his keynote with Healey noting that "that Sony were very, very much behind the game, much more than we had previously thought".[45][46][47] It included a demonstration by Healey, Evans, Harrison, and Peter Smith (senior producer on LittleBigPlanet) showing core gameplay elements throughout a game level and explained that players could create their own levels with tools provided to them within the game.[45][46][48] LittleBigPlanet was one of the games that Sony considered to fit their "Game 3.0" concept of user-generated content.[45][45] Harrison originally suggested having LittleBigPlanet to be free-to-play with downloadable content along with a mechanism to monetise user-generated content to reward the best creators for their innovation.[17][43][49] Some time before its release, development for a sequel started.[20] In July, Media Molecule had 28 employees.[50] LittleBigPlanet was released between 27 October 2008 and 5 November across different regions.[51][52][53] LittleBigPlanet was critically acclaimed by critics,[54] winning over 90 awards including the Award for Artistic Achievement at the 5th British Academy Video Games Awards.[55][56]

LittleBigPlanet sequel, new games, and Sony acquisition (2009–present)[edit]

By January 2009, Media Molecule had 34 employees.[15] A month later, LittleBigPlanet for the PlayStation Portable was announced at the Destination PlayStation meeting with it being primarily developed by SCE Cambridge Studio, alongside Media Molecule.[57][58][59][60][61] It was released in November and it was well-received by critics.[62][63] It was announced on 2 March 2010 that SCE had purchased Media Molecule for an undisclosed sum.[64][65][66][67] Shuhei Yoshida, president of SIE Worldwide Studios, praised the studio's innovation and noted they had "world-class credentials".[64][66] Evans added that "Since Media Molecule's inception, we've had a uniquely close relationship with SCE. Over the years they have consistently shown their dedication to Creative Gaming and Media Molecule, not only through their support of the company, but their willingness to take risks and embrace our often unusual approach and ideas".[65][66] It brought the total number of developers at SCE Worldwide Studios to fifteen.[66] In May 2010, a sequel entitled LittleBigPlanet 2 was officially announced;[68][69] It was released in January 2011 to critical acclaim.[70][71] In June, it was confirmed that LittleBigPlanet PS Vita was not being developed by Media Molecule, instead by Double Eleven, Tarsier Studios, and XDev.[72][73]

In July at Gamelab 2011 in Barcelona, Reddy announced that Media Molecule were stepping away from LittleBigPlanet in order to focus on new game ideas.[74][75][76][77] Media Molecule further added on Twitter that they would always be involved in LittleBigPlanet to some degree.[76][77] Later on in July at a Develop conference, the co-founders stated that they were still involved with LittleBigPlanet 2 providing the upcoming PlayStation Move level pack as an example.[78][79] Healey remarked that "It's a bit like, if you think of LittleBigPlanet as having a child, Sackboy was our child, you get to the stage where they want to leave home, It's kind of like that".[78][79] Evans elaborated by saying that Media Molecule is no longer a "single-threaded company" and noted developing similar games all the time would become stale.[78][79] In January 2012, Media Molecule had spent £4.1 million on research and development to develop new innovative games aiming to reduce the reliance on the LittleBigPlanet brand name.[80] In August 2012, they announced a second project entitled Tearaway, with fifteen developers working on it.[81] The rest of the 25 developers were working on another project which was in the research and development phase which would turn out to be Dreams.[81] Tearaway was released in November 2013 for the PlayStation Vita.[82] Two years later, Media Molecule alongside Tarsier Studios released Tearaway Unfolded, an expanded remake of Tearaway for the PlayStation 4.[83][84]

Whilst Media Molecule may have moved away from LittleBigPlanet they have collaborated and contributed with other studios for other games in the series. This includes: 2009's LittleBigPlanet,[59][60] 2010's Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves,[85][86] 2012's LittleBigPlanet Karting,[87][88] and 2014's LittleBigPlanet 3.[89][90]

Three floor high building with mostly bruck structure with glass windows.
The venue of Media Molecule's satellite studio in Brighton, East Sussex[91]

In October 2016, Media Molecule opened Media Molecule Brighton a 'satellite' (small) studio in Brighton, East Sussex.[91][92][93] They opened the workspace to accommodate a group of developers who had been commuting to and from their headquarters allowing them to reduce travel times.[92][93] The venue where the office is located is called the "Lighthouse" and hosts offices for other organisations like Culture24.[91]

Dreams, a sandbox video game with a game creation system, was announced at Sony Interactive Entertainment's press conference at E3 2015.[94] In April 2019, the game was made available via early access, a first for a Sony game.[95] In December 2019, Sony announced that the game would be released in February 2020.[96]

Philosophy[edit]

Media Molecule aims to have as few employees as achievable. In 2006, Evans stated that Media Molecule wants to stay as small as possible whilst being able to produce a AAA game, aiming to keep the number employees below thirty.[14] Healey stated "I am really intent on keeping us a small focused team I've had enough of working on big, bloated teams, you get too much deadwood in those situations. Everyone at Media Molecule matters."[14] Healey further noted that there are always tensions between people in development, even with two or more people,[97] however, once there are a large number of people it can cause too many tensions and compared it to being in a soap opera.[97] Media Molecule now has around 50 employees.[7]

This philosophy has been modelled by other game developers, most notably by Hideo Kojima of Kojima Productions.[98][99] After visiting Media Molecule in 2016, when Kojima was re-establishing the company he modelled the new studio around Media Molecule, wanting "a small, intimate type of studio".[99][100][101][102] Kojima praised the high number of female employees and relaxed atmosphere comparing it to a family.[99][102][103][104] He set a limit of one hundred employees at Kojima Productions, similar to Media Molecule.[100][101][105]

Games[edit]

Year Game title Platform(s) Notes Ref(s).
PS3 PS4 PSP PS Vita
2008 LittleBigPlanet Yes No No No N/A [52]
2009 LittleBigPlanet No No Yes No Primarily developed by SCE Cambridge Studio [59][60][61]
2010 Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves Yes No No No Co-developed alongside Supermassive Games and XDev [85][86][106][107][108][109]
2011 LittleBigPlanet 2 Yes No No No N/A [70]
2012 LittleBigPlanet Karting Yes No No No Developed by United Front Games and SCE San Diego Studio with Media Molecule in a supporting role [87][88][110]
2013 Tearaway No No No Yes N/A [82]
2014 LittleBigPlanet 3 Yes Yes No No Developed by Sumo Digital with Media Molecule being a contributor in the early stages of development [89][90]
2015 Tearaway Unfolded No Yes No No Co-developed alongside Tarsier Studios [83][84]
2020 Dreams No Yes No No N/A [111]

LittleBigPlanet (2008–2014)[edit]

Media Molecule is the creator of the LittleBigPlanet series and developed the first two games, LittleBigPlanet (2008) and LittleBigPlanet 2 (2011) for the PlayStation 3 in addition to co-developing the PlayStation Portable version of the same name (2009) alongside SCE Cambridge Studio (which was the primary developer).[59][60][61] It is a series of puzzle platformer games that follow Sackboy a small, brown, anthropomorphic, humanoid creature made of fabric with a zip fastener and button eyes across a variety of levels.[112][113][114] The series features user-generated content, allowing players to create levels which can be shared and played to others online.[45][46][51][52][112] The three games have collectively sold 8.5 million units.[112] Sackboy has featured in every LittleBigPlanet game and is a mascot for the PlayStation brand.[112] In 2011, Media Molecule stepped away from the LittleBigPlanet series.[74] Despite stepping away from the series they have collaborated and contributed with other studios for other games in the series including Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves (2010),[85][86] LittleBigPlanet Karting (2012),[87][88] and LittleBigPlanet 3 (2014).[89][90]

Tearaway (2013–2015)[edit]

Media Molecule is the creator of the Tearaway series and developed Tearaway (2013) for the PlayStation Vita and co-developed Tearaway Unfolded (2015), an expanded remake of the previous game, for the PlayStation 4 alongside Tarsier Studios.[82][83][84] Tearaway is a platform-adventure game that follows Ioata or Atoi through a world made of paper.[115] The game utilizes the PlayStation Vita's numerous sensors and inputs when interacting with the in-game environment like the rear touchpad, touchscreen, and cameras.[82][116] Both games received "generally favourable reviews" according to review aggregator Metacritic.[117][118]

Dreams (2020–present)[edit]

Dreams is a game creation system allowing players to create and share their own levels similar to that of LittleBigPlanet. Players can create games from a range of different genres including point-and-click adventures, puzzle-platformers, and shoot'em ups.[111] Players interact with the game's world by controlling an "imp", similar to a mouse cursor, to create new items and characters.[119] It was released in February 2020, with it receiving "generally favourable reviews" according to review aggregator Metacritic.[111][120]

Awards[edit]

Year Award Category Result Ref(s).
2008 Spike Video Game Awards Studio of the Year Won [121]
2009 Develop Award Best Independent Developer Won [122]
Best New Studio Won [122]
BAFTA Children's Award Video Game Won [123]
BAFTA Games Award Artistic Achievement Won [124]
Golden Joystick Award Family Game of the Year Won [125]
2011 Develop Award Family Won [126]
2012 BAFTA Games Award Game Innovation Won [127]
Artistic Achievement Nominated [128]
2014 Mobile & Handheld Won [129]
Family Won [130]
Artistic Achievement Won [131]
2016 Young Game Designers: Industry Hero Won [132]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Alex Evans, Kareem Ettouney, Mark Healey, and David Smith are the principal founders of the company, while Chris Lee (entitled the "man with the business plan") and accountant Mags Hardwick were also part of the founding team.[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21] Smith stated in an interview that "I am one of the original four or five or six [co-founders], it depends on how you count us".[22] Some sources erroneously name Siobhan Reddy as a co-founder,[23][24][25] though she joined a few months after the company's incorporation.[8][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Media Molecule - Office Design". www.officedesign.co.uk. Archived from the original on 15 September 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  2. ^ "Siobhan Margaret REDDY". Companies House. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  3. ^ "BAME in Games July BBQ Meet @ Media Molecule". interests.me. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  4. ^ "Office Guildford PDF - Office Design" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 25 November 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "Certificate of Incorporation - Media Molecule" (PDF). Companies House. 4 January 2006. Archived from the original on 15 September 2019. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Media Molecule - Full Accounts" (PDF). Companies House. Government of the United Kingdom. 22 November 2019. pp. 9–10. Archived from the original on 21 December 2019. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Working at Media Molecule". Media Molecule. Archived from the original on 12 June 2017. Retrieved 18 May 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Media Molecule staff. "History". Media Molecule. Archived from the original on 17 September 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  9. ^ a b Leone, Matt (18 November 2013). "Making Tearaway: Start to finish". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 18 August 2019. Retrieved 18 November 2019.
  10. ^ a b c Boyer, Brandon (21 September 2006). "Media Molecule Cooking Exclusively For PS3". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. Archived from the original on 14 November 2013. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Simons, Iain (2007). Inside Game Design. United Kingdom: Laurence King (published 27 September 2007). ISBN 978-1856695329. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
  12. ^ a b c Dealessandri, Marie (4 July 2019). "'We love starting again!' – Why Media Molecule remade Dreams from scratch". MCV/Develop. Biz Media. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 25 October 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d "Media Molecule sign exclusive deal with Sony Computer Entertainment Europe". Media Molecule. 21 September 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 September 2012. Retrieved 14 December 2007. The company was founded in January this year by Alex Evans, Mark Healey, Dave Smith and Kareem Ettouney.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Boyer, Brandon (10 November 2006). "Q&A: The Organic Chemistry Of Media Molecule". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. Archived from the original on 13 January 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
  15. ^ a b Woodward, David (20 January 2009). "Media Molecule". Director. Institute of Directors. Archived from the original on 14 December 2010. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  16. ^ Kim, Tom. "In Depth: Media Molecule On LBP 's Genesis And Future". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. Archived from the original on 12 November 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2019.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h Parkin, Simon (20 July 2011). "Develop: LittleBigPlanet Was Originally Free-To-Play Reveals Media Molecule". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  18. ^ a b Yin-Poole, Wesley (20 July 2011). "Media Molecule". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  19. ^ Stanislao, Manuel (19 January 2013). "Media Molecule: non solo LittleBigPlanet" [Media Molecule: not just LittleBigPlanet]. Eurogamer (in Italian). Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 23 December 2019. Retrieved 23 December 2019.
  20. ^ a b Waters, Darren (24 October 2008). "Game on for British developers". BBC News. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  21. ^ Lewis P (20 July 2011). "MM: 1.5 million new users came to LBP after PSN outage". VG247. videogaming247. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  22. ^ a b Stuart, Keith (6 June 2014). "A day in the life of Media Molecule – as it happened". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 26 April 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  23. ^ a b Dougherty, Scott (19 February 2013). "From Donkey Kong to power list: Siobhan makes big impact in UK". The Sydney Morning Herald. Nine Entertainment Co. Archived from the original on 25 October 2019. Retrieved 25 October 2019.
  24. ^ a b Wen, Alan (17 July 2019). "From LittleBigPlanet to Dreams: Media Molecule and the future of DIY gaming". TechRadar. Archived from the original on 25 October 2019. Retrieved 17 November 2019.
  25. ^ Lawrence, Jenny (3 November 2016). "Celebrate 10 years of Media Molecule with a very special LBParty!". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on 19 July 2017. Retrieved 17 November 2019.
  26. ^ a b c d "From The Archive: When Media Molecule interviewed Ralph Baer". MCV/Develop. Biz Media. 8 December 2014. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  27. ^ Handrahan, Matthew (25 October 2019). "Media Molecule wants Dreams games published "to other devices and beyond"". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  28. ^ Elliott, Phil (19 June 2008). "Alex Evans - Part One". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 December 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  29. ^ a b "Revisiting Bullfrog: 25 Years On". Retro Gamer. No. 110. Bournemouth: Imagine Publishing. December 2012. pp. 60–67. ISSN 1742-3155.
  30. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (12 May 2016). "Lionhead: The inside story". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 21 May 2016. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  31. ^ a b c d e "MM: 1.5 million new users came to LBP after PSN outage". VG247. videogaming247. 20 July 2011. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  32. ^ a b Sassoon, Alex (20 July 2011). "A close look at Little Big Planet's Media Molecule". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  33. ^ Sinclair, Brendan (13 October 2005). "Rag Doll Kung Fu now playing". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  34. ^ a b c Kelly, Neon (20 July 2011). "How LBP creators nearly robbed the world of Portal". VideoGamer. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  35. ^ a b c "LittleBigPlanet: The Very Big Interview, with Media Molecule". Kikizo. 30 September 2008. Archived from the original on 6 September 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  36. ^ Bowden, Mike (26 June 2008). "Phil Harrison's influence on LittleBigPlanet was "pivotal"". VG247. videogaming247. Archived from the original on 15 December 2019. Retrieved 15 December 2019.
  37. ^ a b c "Little Big Planet [PS3 – Beta / Prototype]". Unseen64. 4 April 2008. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  38. ^ a b Rory Cellan-Jones (10 March 2009). "A Little Big Business". BBC News. Archived from the original on 3 April 2011. Retrieved 11 October 2010.
  39. ^ "From YellowHead to Sackboy". Media Molecule. 8 November 2010. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  40. ^ Bramwell, Tom (2 July 2008). "Media Molecule's David Smith talks LittleBigPlanet". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  41. ^ a b c "Media Molecule Sign Exclusive Deal With Sony Computer Entertainment Europe". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. 21 September 2006. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  42. ^ a b c "Media Molecule signs exclusive deal with Sony Computer Entertainment Europe". Media Molecule. 1 June 2006. Archived from the original on 19 August 2010. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  43. ^ a b c d Purchese, Robert (20 July 2011). "Sony wanted LittleBigPlanet free-to-play". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  44. ^ a b Barnett, Brian (20 November 2019). "Why LittleBigPlanet Was the Best Game Pitch This Ex-Sony Exec Ever Saw – IGN Unfiltered". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 26 November 2019. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  45. ^ a b c d e Gibson, Ellie (7 March 2007). "GDC: Phil Harrison's Keynote Speech". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 20 August 2019. Retrieved 18 November 2019.
  46. ^ a b c Purchese, Robert (7 March 2007). "GDC: LittleBigPlanet announced". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 5 December 2019. Retrieved 18 November 2019.
  47. ^ Mark Healey (17 July 2008). "My LittleBig Game". Edge. Future. Archived from the original on 6 June 2012. Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  48. ^ "GDC 2007 LittleBigPlanet first demonstration", YouTube, 13 January 2011, archived from the original on 5 September 2019, retrieved 18 November 2019
  49. ^ Pearson, Dan (20 July 2011). "LBP was almost a downloadable, free-to-play title". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 5 December 2019. Retrieved 18 November 2019.
  50. ^ Waters, Darren (25 July 2008). "Media Molecule hits little big time". BBC News. Archived from the original on 28 August 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  51. ^ a b Cocker, Guy (27 October 2008). "LittleBigPlanet Review". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 9 September 2019. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  52. ^ a b c Roper, Chris (13 October 2008). "LittleBigPlanet Review". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 16 December 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  53. ^ Suttner, Nick (29 October 2008). "LittleBigPlanet (PS3)". 1Up.com. IGN. Archived from the original on 13 November 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  54. ^ "LittleBigPlanet". Metacritic. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  55. ^ Rory Cellan-Jones (11 March 2009). "Three Baftas for Call of Duty 4". BBC News. Archived from the original on 13 March 2009. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  56. ^ Schilling, Mark (2 March 2010). "Sony acquires Media Molecule". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  57. ^ Crecente, Brian (24 February 2009). "LittleBigPlanet, Rock Band, Assassin's Creed Coming to PSP". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on 17 November 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  58. ^ Miller, Greg (24 February 2009). "MEGATON: Major Franchises Assault PSP". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 17 November 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  59. ^ a b c d Brian Crecente (24 February 2009). "LittleBigPlanet, Rock Band, Assassin's Creed Coming to PSP". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on 17 September 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  60. ^ a b c d Miller, Greg (24 February 2009). "MEGATON: Major Franchises Assault PSP". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 18 February 2014. Retrieved 25 February 2009.
  61. ^ a b c Orry, James (26 February 2009). "Sony Cambridge is the primary developer of LBP PSP". VideoGamer.com. Resero Network. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  62. ^ Miller, Greg (17 November 2009). "LittleBigPlanet PSP Review". IGN. News Corporation. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  63. ^ "LittleBigPlanet PSP". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. 2009. Archived from the original on 9 October 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  64. ^ a b "Sony Computer Entertainment Acquires Media Molecule Studios" (PDF). 2 March 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  65. ^ a b "Sony Computer Entertainment Acquires Media Molecule". Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on 17 September 2019. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  66. ^ a b c d "Sony acquires Media Molecule". MCV/Develop. Biz Media. 2 March 2010. Archived from the original on 17 September 2019. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  67. ^ "Sony buys Media Molecule". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. 3 March 2010. Archived from the original on 6 March 2010. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  68. ^ Reilly, Jim (7 May 2010). "LittleBigPlanet 2 Confirmed (For Real This Time)". IGN. News Corporation. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  69. ^ Barker, Sammy (10 May 2010). "LittleBigPlanet 2 Formally Announced For Release This Year". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 July 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  70. ^ a b Miller, Greg (4 January 2011). "LittleBigPlanet 2 Review". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  71. ^ "LittleBigPlanet 2 PlayStation 3". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. 2011. Archived from the original on 2 May 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  72. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (27 June 2011). "Who's making LittleBigPlanet Vita?". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  73. ^ Sterling, Jim (12 September 2012). "Review: LittleBigPlanet PS Vita". Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  74. ^ a b Purchese, Robert (1 July 2011). "MM "stepping away" from LittleBigPlanet". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 16 November 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  75. ^ "Media Molecule "stepping away" from LBP". Edge. Future plc. 1 July 2011. Archived from the original on 3 July 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  76. ^ a b Makuch, Eddie (1 July 2011). "Media Molecule 'stepping away' from Little Big Planet - Report". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  77. ^ a b Michael, McWhertor (1 July 2011). "LittleBigPlanet Creators 'Stepping Away' from Series to Pursue 'New Ideas'". Kotaku. G/O Media. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  78. ^ a b c Yin-Poole, Wesley (20 July 2011). "Media Molecule: "It's time to expand"". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  79. ^ a b c Barker, Sammy (20 July 2011). "Media Molecule Talk Candidly About Leaving LittleBigPlanet Behind". Push Square. Gamer Network. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  80. ^ Dutton, Fred (7 January 2012). "Media Molecule focusing on "new, risky innovations"". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 8 September 2015. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  81. ^ a b Robinson, Martin (16 August 2012). "Media Molecule working on second project". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 17 November 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  82. ^ a b c d Krupa, Daniel (20 November 2013). "Tearaway Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  83. ^ a b c Krupa, Daniel (2 September 2015). "Tearaway Unfolded Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  84. ^ a b c Sarkar, Samit (1 March 2017). "PlayStation Plus games for March 2017 include Tearaway, Severed (correction)". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 17 January 2018. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  85. ^ a b c "Supermassive Games - LittleBigPlanet 2- Level Kits". Supermassive Games. 2012. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  86. ^ a b c "Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves". PlayStation. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on 5 November 2019. Retrieved 5 November 2019.
  87. ^ a b c Siobhan Reddy (22 March 2012). "LittleBigPlanet Karting is Coming to PS3!". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on 7 September 2019. Retrieved 18 May 2015.
  88. ^ a b c Makuch, Eddie. "Little Big Planet Karting arrives Nov. 6". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 5 November 2019. Retrieved 5 November 2019.
  89. ^ a b c Holmes, Mike (26 June 2014). "Media Molecule involved with LittleBigPlanet 3". Gamereactor. Gamez Publishing A/S. Archived from the original on 5 September 2019. Retrieved 26 June 2014.
  90. ^ a b c Scammell, David. "LittleBigPlanet 3 has been in development for 3 years". VideoGamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 23 May 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  91. ^ a b c "Lighthouse - Who's Here". Lighthouse. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  92. ^ a b "Introducing Mm Brighton!". Media Molecule. 21 October 2016. Archived from the original on 9 June 2019. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  93. ^ a b Barker, Sammy (24 October 2016). "Media Molecule Opens Satellite Studio in Brighton". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 17 July 2017. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  94. ^ Sheridan, Connor (16 June 2015). "LittleBigPlanet devs share their Dreams on PlayStation 4". GamesRadar. Future Publishing. Archived from the original on 8 August 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  95. ^ Frank, Allegra (20 February 2019). "Dreams enters 'early access' on PS4 this spring". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 17 November 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  96. ^ Heppe, Abbie (10 December 2019). "The full version of Dreams will launch on PS4 next February". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on 10 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  97. ^ a b Sheffield, Brandon. "Paris GDC: Media Molecule On Making LittleBigPlanet". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. Archived from the original on 14 December 2019. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  98. ^ Sliva, Marty (26 January 2017). "Hideo Kojima, Death Stranding, and Building the Studio". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 12 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  99. ^ a b c Barker, Sammy (24 May 2016). "Hideo Kojima Modelling New Studio on Media Molecule". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 17 July 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  100. ^ a b Holmes, Mike (23 May 2016). "Kojima on why he's modelling his studio on Media Molecule". Gamereactor. Gamez Publishing A/S. Archived from the original on 16 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  101. ^ a b "Kojima's new studio is modeled on Media Molecule and won't go over 100 employees". PCGamesN. Network N. 24 May 2016. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  102. ^ a b Prell, Sam (23 May 2016). "Hideo Kojima is modeling his new studio after LittleBigPlanet dev Media Molecule". GamesRadar+. Future Publishing. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  103. ^ Goldfarb, Andrew (19 February 2016). "DICE 2016: Why Kojima Hopes to Keep His New Studio Small". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 10 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  104. ^ "Kojima's new studio inspired by Media Molecule". MCV/Develop. Biz Media. 24 May 2016. Archived from the original on 16 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  105. ^ "Hideo Kojima's World Tour: Building Games & Studios". Gamereactor. Gamez Publishing A/S. 24 May 2016. Archived from the original on 16 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  106. ^ Guanio, Daniel (25 January 2011). "Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves". Gamereactor. Gamez Publishing A/S. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  107. ^ Bradford, Matt (23 June 2012). "Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves review". GamesRadar+. Future plc. Archived from the original on 24 February 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  108. ^ Caoili, Eric (6 January 2012). "Media Molecule invests millions to stop relying on LittleBigPlanet". Gamasutra. United Business Media. Archived from the original on 12 November 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  109. ^ "LittleBigPlanet: Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves". GameSpy. IGN. 2010. Archived from the original on 24 September 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  110. ^ Goldfarb, Andrew (2 May 2012). "LittleBigPlanet Karting: A Platformer on Wheels". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on 18 September 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  111. ^ a b c Cardy, Simon (13 February 2020). "Dreams Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 1 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  112. ^ a b c d Yin-Poole, Wesley (9 November 2012). "The rise of Sackboy, the mascot PlayStation has been searching for". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 24 February 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
  113. ^ LittleBigPlanet (2008) developed by Media Molecule published by Sony Computer Entertainment
  114. ^ LittleBigPlanet 2 (2011) developed by Media Molecule published by Sony Computer Entertainment
  115. ^ Leone, Matt (18 November 2013). "Making Tearaway: Start to finish". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 17 November 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  116. ^ Groth-Andersen, Magnus (20 November 2013). "Tearaway (Review)". Gamereactor. Archived from the original on 1 March 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  117. ^ "Tearaway PlayStation Vita". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 12 July 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  118. ^ "Tearaway Unfoleded PlayStation 4". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 16 September 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  119. ^ Purchese, Robert (27 October 2015). "Watch: What you actually do in Media Molecule's new game Dreams". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  120. ^ "Dreams for PlayStation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 23 April 2018. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  121. ^ Haas, Pete (15 December 2008). "Spike 2008 VGA Results". CINEMABLEND. Archived from the original on 9 April 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  122. ^ a b "Develop Winners 2009". GamesIndustry.biz. Archived from the original on 14 December 2017. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  123. ^ "BAFTA - Children's Video Game in 2009". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 27 September 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  124. ^ "2009 Games Artistic Achievement | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 27 September 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  125. ^ "Golden Joystick Award Winners 2009". BBC Newsbeat. 30 October 2009. Archived from the original on 15 November 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  126. ^ "2012 Games Family | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 27 September 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  127. ^ "2012 Game Innovation | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 27 September 2018. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  128. ^ "2012 Games Artistic Achievement | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  129. ^ "2014 Mobile & Handheld Games | BAFA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 4 February 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  130. ^ "2014 Games Family | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 4 February 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  131. ^ "2014 Games Artistic Achievement | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 4 February 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  132. ^ "Media Molecule - BAFTA Young Game Designers". ygd.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 13 March 2019. Retrieved 14 September 2019.

External links[edit]