Republican Party presidential primaries, 2000

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Republican Party presidential primaries, 2000
United States
← 1996 January 24 to June 6, 2000 2004 →
  GeorgeWBush.jpg John McCain.jpg Alan Keyes.jpg
Nominee George W. Bush John McCain Alan Keyes
Home state Texas Arizona Maryland
Delegate count 1,496 244 22
Contests won 44 7 0
Popular vote 12,034,676 6,061,332 985,819
Percentage 62.0% 31.2% 5.1%

2000 Republican Primary Results.svg
Republican primary results. Red denotes a Bush win. Yellow denotes a McCain win.

Previous Republican nominee

Bob Dole

Republican nominee

George W. Bush

The 2000 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2000 U.S. presidential election. Texas Governor George W. Bush was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 2000 Republican National Convention held from July 31 to August 3, 2000, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Primary race overview[edit]

The primary contest began with a fairly wide field, as the Republicans lacked an incumbent President or Vice President. Texas Governor George W. Bush, son of George H. W. Bush, the most recent Republican president, took an early lead with the support of much of the party establishment and a strong fund-raising effort. Former cabinet member George Shultz played an important early role in securing establishment Republican support for Bush. In April 1998, he invited Bush to discuss policy issues with experts including Michael Boskin, John Taylor, and Condoleezza Rice. The group, which was "looking for a candidate for 2000 with good political instincts, someone they could work with," was impressed, and Shultz encouraged him to enter the race.[1] Thanks in part to establishment backing, Bush dominated in early polling and fundraising figures. After stumbling in early primary debates, Bush easily won the Iowa caucuses.

Arizona Senator John McCain, considered a dark horse, won 48% of the vote to Bush's 30% in the first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary, giving his campaign a boost of energy and donations.

The main primary season, then, came down to a race between Bush and McCain. McCain's campaign, centered on campaign finance reform, drew positive press coverage and a fair amount of public excitement, with polls giving the senator superior crossover support from independents and Democrats.[2][3][4] Bush's campaign focused on "compassionate conservatism," including a greater role for the federal government in education, subsidies for private charitable programs, and large reductions in income and capital gains taxes.

The next primary contest in South Carolina was notorious for its negative tone. Although the Bush campaign said it was not behind any attacks on McCain, locals who supported Bush reportedly handed out fliers and made telephone calls to prospective voters suggesting among other things, that McCain was a "Manchurian candidate" and that he had fathered a child out of wedlock with a black New York-based prostitute (an incorrect reference to a child he and his wife had adopted from Bangladesh). Bush also drew fire for a speech made at Bob Jones University, a school that still banned interracial dating among its students.[5] But the governor was seen to have the upper hand in a debate hosted by Larry King Live, and he won in South Carolina by nine points. McCain won primaries in Michigan, his home state of Arizona, and a handful of New England states, but faced difficulty in appealing to conservative Republican primary voters. This was particularly true in Michigan, where despite winning the primary, McCain lost the GOP vote to Bush by a wide margin.[6] McCain also competed in the Virginia primary, counting on continued crossover support by giving a speech blasting the religious right. It backfired, and Bush won the state easily. Bush's subsequent Super Tuesday victories in California, New York and the South made it nearly impossible, mathematically, for McCain to catch up, and he suspended his campaign the next day.

Other candidates included social conservative activist Gary Bauer, businessman Steve Forbes, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, former Ambassador Alan Keyes, former Tennessee Governor Lamar Alexander, former Red Cross director and cabinet member Elizabeth Dole, Ohio Congressman John Kasich, and former Vice President Dan Quayle. Bauer and Hatch campaigned on a traditional Republican platform of opposition to legalized abortion and reductions in taxes. Keyes had a far more conservative platform, calling for the elimination of all federal taxes except tariffs. Keyes also called for a return to a ban on homosexuals in the military, while most GOP candidates supported the "don't ask, don't tell" policy. Keyes continued to participate in the campaign for nearly all the primaries and continued to appear in the debates with frontrunners McCain and Bush. As in 1996, Forbes campaigned on making the federal income tax non-graduated, an idea he called the flat tax, although he increased his focus on social conservatives in 2000. Although Forbes came a close second to Bush in the Iowa caucuses and tied with him in the Alaska caucuses, none of these other candidates won a primary.

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Withdrew at convention[edit]

Withdrew during primary elections[edit]

Withdrew before primary elections[edit]

Mentioned candidates who did not run

Polling[edit]

Source Date George W. Bush John McCain Alan Keyes Steve Forbes Gary Bauer Orrin Hatch Elizabeth Dole Lamar Alexander Dan Quayle Pat Buchanan Bob Smith John Kasich John Ashcroft Newt Gingrich Jack Kemp Fred Thompson Christine Todd Whitman
Gallup Sep. 6-7, 1997 22% - - 9% - - - 3% 10% 5% 2% - 3% 5% 15% 5% 9%
Gallup May 8–10, 1998 30% 4% - 7% 1% - 14% 2% 9% 3% - 1% - 6% 9% - -
Gallup Oct. 23-25, 1998 39% - - 7% - - 17% 4% 12% - - 4% 4% 4% - - -
Gallup Jan. 8-10, 1999 42% 8% - 5% 2% - 22% 4% 6% - 1% 2% - - - - -
Gallup Mar. 12-14, 1999 52% 3% - 1% 1% - 20% 2% 9% 4% 1% 3% - - - - -
Gallup Apr. 13-14, 1999 53% 5% - 6% 2% - 16% - 7% 4% - 2% - - - - -
Gallup Apr. 30-May 2, 1999 42% 4% - 6% 3% - 24% 3% 6% 5% - 1% - - - - -
Gallup May 23–24, 1999 46% 6% - 5% 2% - 18% 1% 7% 6% 2% 2% - - - - -
Gallup Jun. 4-5, 1999 46% 5% - 5% 1% - 14% 3% 9% 6% 1% 1% - - - - -
Gallup Jun. 25-27, 1999 59% 5% - 6% 2% 2% 8% 2% 6% 3% 1% 3% - - - - -
Gallup Aug. 16-18, 1999 61% 5% 1% 4% 2% 1% 13% - 6% 3% - - - - - - -
Gallup Sep. 10-14, 1999 62% 5% 1% 5% 2% 2% 10% - 5% 3% - - - - - - -
Gallup Oct. 8-10, 1999 60% 8% 3% 4% 3% 2% 11% - - 3% - - - - - - -
Gallup Oct. 21-24, 1999 68% 11% 2% 8% 1% 3% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Nov. 4-7, 1999 68% 12% 2% 6% 2% 2% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Nov. 18-21, 1999 63% 16% 2% 6% 3% 4% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Dec. 9-12, 1999 64% 18% 4% 7% 2% 2% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Dec. 20-21, 1999 60% 17% 4% 9% 2% 1% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Jan. 7-10, 2000 63% 18% 2% 5% 1% 2% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Jan. 13-16, 2000 61% 22% 3% 5% 2% 1% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Jan. 17-19, 2000 63% 19% 1% 6% 2% 1% - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Jan. 25-26, 2000 65% 15% 4% 7% 2% - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Feb. 4-6, 2000 56% 34% 3% 2% - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Feb. 14-15, 2000 58% 31% 3% - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Feb. 20-21, 2000 58% 31% 3% - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gallup Feb. 25-27, 2000 57% 33% 4% - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Results[edit]

Statewide[edit]

2000 Republican primary and caucus results[9]
George W. Bush John McCain Alan Keyes Steve Forbes Gary Bauer Orrin Hatch
January 24
(0)
Alaska (caucus) 36.28% 9.52% 9.49% 36.17% 4.78% 3.76%
January 24
(25)
Iowa (caucus) 41.01%
(10)
4.67%
(1)
14.25%
(4)
30.51%
(8)
8.54%
(2)
1.02%
February 1
(17)
New Hampshire (primary) 30.36%
(5)
48.53%
(10)
6.37% 12.66%
(2)
0.69% 0.07%
February 8
(12)
Delaware (primary) 50.73%
(12)
25.41% 3.82% 19.57% 0.40% 0.07%
February 19
(37)
South Carolina (primary) 53.39%
(34)
41.87%
(3)
4.54% 0.08% 0.11% 0.01%
February 22
(30)
Arizona (primary) 35.68% 60.03%
(30)
3.56% 0.38% 0.05% 0.20%
February 22
(58)
Michigan (primary) 43.05%
(6)
50.97%
(52)
4.62% 0.38% 0.21% 0.07%
February 27
(14)
Puerto Rico (primary) 94.21%
(14)
5.29% 0.05% 0.23% 0.04% -
February 29
(56)
Virginia (primary) 52.79%
(56)
43.89% 3.07% 0.12% 0.13% -
February 29
(12)
Washington (primary) 48.26%
(7)
47.98%
(5)
2.53% 0.62% 0.34% 0.27%
February 29
(19)
North Dakota (caucus) 75.72%
(14)
18.94%
(4)
5.31%
(1)
- - -
March 7
(162)
California (primary) 52.21%
(162)
42.87% 4.10% 0.35% 0.25% 0.22%
March 7
(25)
Connecticut (primary) 46.28% 48.74%
(25)
3.30% 0.69% 0.21% 0.10%
March 7
(54)
Georgia (primary) 66.93%
(54)
27.84% 4.61% 0.26% 0.31% 0.06%
March 7
(14)
Maine (primary) 51.03%
(14)
44.00% 3.09% 0.47% 0.34% -
March 7
(31)
Maryland (primary) 56.23%
(31)
36.16% 6.65% 0.45% 0.35% 0.16%
March 7
(37)
Massachusetts (primary) 31.78% 64.81%
(37)
2.52% 0.28% 0.22% 0.05%
March 7
(34)
Minnesota (caucus) 63%
(34)
17% 20% - - -
March 7
(35)
Missouri (primary) 57.93%
(35)
35.31% 5.74% 0.43% 0.22% 0.08%
March 7
(93)
New York (primary) 50.30%
(67)
43.50%
(26)
3.60% 2.60% - -
March 7
(69)
Ohio (primary) 57.99%
(63)
36.98%
(6)
3.95% 0.64% 0.44 -
March 7
(14)
Rhode Island (primary) 36.43% 60.18%
(14)
2.55% 0.25% 0.10% 0.10%
March 7
(12)
Vermont (primary) 35.33% 60.29%
(12)
2.66% 0.76% 0.36% -
March 7
(25)
Washington (caucus) 82.15%
(25)
12.88% 4.97% - - -
March 10
(22)
Wyoming (caucus) 77.62%
(22)
10.29% 11.66% - - -
March 10
(40)
Colorado (primary) 64.71%
(28)
27.12%
(12)
6.57% 0.66% 0.66% 0.28%
March 10
(29)
Utah (primary) 63.28%
(29)
14.04% 21.27% 0.94% 0.47% -
March 14
(80)
Florida (primary) 73.80%
(80)
19.94% 4.63% 0.94% 0.50% 0.20%
March 14
(29)
Louisiana (primary) 83.60%
(29)
8.91% 5.73% 1.01% 0.75% -
March 14
(33)
Mississippi (primary) 88%
(33)
5.45% 5.63% 0.51% 0.41% 0.12%
March 14
(38)
Oklahoma (primary) 79.15%
(38)
10.39% 9.29% 0.85% 0.32% -
March 14
(37)
Tennessee (primary) 77.02%
(37)
14.53% 6.75% 0.41 0.52% 0.10%
March 14
(124)
Texas (primary) 87.54%
(124)
7.11% 3.86% 0.25% 0.19% 0.12%
March 21
(64)
Illinois (primary) 67.40%
(64)
21.54% 8.97% 1.40% 0.69% -
April 4
(78)
Pennsylvania (primary) 72.47%
(78)
22.36% 1.09% 2.48% 1.35% -
April 4
(37)
Wisconsin (primary) 69.24%
(37)
18.09% 9.87% 1.11% 0.37% 0.35%
May 2
(30)
Indiana (primary) 81.17%
(30)
18.83% - - - -
May 2
(62)
North Carolina (primary) 78.60%
(49)
10.86%
(7)
7.85%
(5)
- 1.03%
(1)
-
May 2
(15)
Washington, D.C. (primary) 72.79%
(15)
24.37% - - - -
May 9
(30)
Nebraska (primary) 78.15%
(30)
15.11% 6.50% - - -
May 9
(18)
West Virginia (primary) 79.57%
(18)
12.91% 4.76% 1.58% 1.18% -
May 16
(24)
Oregon (primary) 83.62%
(21)
- 13.37%
(3)
- - -
May 23
(24)
Arkansas (primary) 80.23%
(19)
- 19.77%
(5)
- - -
May 23
(22)
Idaho (primary) 73.45%
(16)
- 19.10%
(4)
- - -
May 23
(31)
Kentucky (primary) 82.98%
(31)
6.33% 4.75% 1.30% 2.64% -
May 23
(35)
Kansas (caucus) ?%
(35)
 ?%  ?%  ?%  ?% -
June 6
(44)
Alabama (primary) 84.24%
(44)
- 11.52% - - -
June 6
(23)
Montana (primary) 77.59%
(23)
- 18.32% - - -
June 6
(54)
New Jersey (primary) 83.56%
(54)
16.44% - - - -
June 6
(21)
New Mexico (primary) 82.63%
(21)
10.13% 6.45% - - -
June 6
(22)
South Dakota (primary) 78.22%
(22)
13.75% 7.68% - - -
     Win for George W. Bush
     Win for John S. McCain

Nationwide[edit]

Popular vote result:[10]

Notable endorsements[edit]

Note: Some of the endorsers switched positions.

George W. Bush
John McCain
Steve Forbes
Alan Keyes
Orrin Hatch
Lamar Alexander
Dan Quayle
John Kasich

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Choice 2004". Frontlinehttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/choice2004/etc/script.html |transcripturl= missing title (help). Boston. October 12, 2004. PBS. WGBH-TV. 
  2. ^ THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: CROSSOVER VOTERS; Democrats Drawn to McCain Are Unsettling Republicans
  3. ^ Democrats helped McCain over finish line in 2000 Michigan GOP primary
  4. ^ Stuart Rothenberg: Can Democrats and independents nominate John McCain?
  5. ^ Cornell University Law School, "Bob Jones Uni v. v. United States", "Legal Information Institute", retrieved February 9, 2017
  6. ^ THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: MICHIGAN; Loss by Bush Forces Debate on Open Primaries. New York Times. 2000-02-27. Retrieved 2017-06-03.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Starr, Alexandra (July–August 1999). "Running Mates: Who will be on the ticket in 2000?". The Washington Monthly. 
  8. ^ a b Riley, Charles; Hornick, Ed (March 5, 2010). "Rove: Cheney 'squirmed' when offered VP spot". CNN. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 
  9. ^ 2000 Republican Primary Election Events Timeline
  10. ^ "US President - R Primaries Race", Our Campaigns, February 1, 2000, retrieved February 28, 2011
  11. ^ "Mississippi US President Republican Primary Race". March 14, 2000. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h "US President—Republican Primaries Race". Our Campaigns. February 1, 2000. Retrieved November 16, 2008. 
  13. ^ a b "New Hampshire US President—Republican Primary Race". Our Campaigns. February 1, 2000. Retrieved November 16, 2008. 
  14. ^ Berke, Richard L. (October 25, 1999). "McCain Having to Prove Himself Even in Arizona". New York Times. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  15. ^ a b "Arizona US President—Republican Primary Race—Feb 22, 2000". 
  16. ^ a b "Virginia US President—Republican Primary Race". Our Campaigns. February 29, 2000. Retrieved November 16, 2008. 
  17. ^ "Missouri US President Republican Primary Race—Mar 7, 2000". 
  18. ^ "Massachusetts US President Republican Primary Race—Mar 7, 2000". 
  19. ^ "Wisconsin US President—Republican Primary Race—Apr 4, 2000". 
  20. ^ "South Dakota US President—Republican Primary Race—Jun 6, 2000". 
  21. ^ "Tennessee US President—Republican Primary Race—Mar 14, 2000". 
  22. ^ "Ohio US President—Republican Primary Race—Mar 7, 2000". 
  23. ^ "Nebraska US President Republican Primary Race—May 9, 2000". 
  24. ^ a b "South Carolina US President—Republican Primary Race". Our Campaigns. February 19, 2000. Retrieved November 16, 2008. 
  25. ^ "Candidate—Peter T. King". 
  26. ^ "Candidate—Guy V. Molinari". 
  27. ^ "Candidate—Gary Johnson". 
  28. ^ "Candidate—Bob Barr". 
  29. ^ "Candidate—Roscoe G. Bartlett". 
  30. ^ "Candidate—J. Kenneth Blackwell". 
  31. ^ Sliming Palin Archived February 27, 2011, at the Wayback Machine., FactCheck.org (September 8, 2008)
  32. ^ "OK US President—Republican Primary Race—Mar 14, 2000".