2020 Libertarian Party presidential primaries

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Libertarian Party presidential primaries, 2020

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Preferential poll

Previous Libertarian nominee

Gary Johnson

Presumptive Libertarian nominee

N/A

The 2020 Libertarian Party presidential primaries and caucuses will presumably allow electors to indicate non-binding preferences for the Libertarian Party's presidential candidate in the 2020 presidential election.

Candidates[edit]

Declared candidates[edit]

Candidate Current or previous positions State Campaign Ref
Kokesh2013 (cropped).jpg
Adam Kokesh
Republican candidate for U.S. Representative
from New Mexico in 2010

Write-in candidate for United States Senate
from Arizona in 2018
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
Announced
July 18, 2013
(Campaign)
[1]
John McAfee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John McAfee
Founder and CEO of McAfee, Inc. (1987–1994) Flag of Tennessee.svg
Tennessee
Announced
June 3, 2018
[2]
Lozwp DSC00677.jpg
Vermin Supreme
Performance artist
Perennial candidate
Flag of Kansas.svg
Kansas
Announced
August 22, 2017
[3][4]
Arvin Vohra on The Tatiana Show.jpg
Arvin Vohra
Former Vice-Chair of the Libertarian Party
Libertarian nominee for United States Senate
from Maryland in 2018
Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
Announced
July 3, 2018

(Campaign)

[5]

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

Publicly expressed interest[edit]


Speculative candidates[edit]

Declined to be candidates[edit]

Primaries[edit]

The Libertarian Party will be eligible to participate in presidential primaries in numerous states.[38]

  • California[39] - March 3 - The Secretary of State determines which candidates will appear. A candidate not placed on the ballot by the Secretary of State may petition for inclusion.[40]
  • Massachusetts[41] - March 3 - The Secretary of State determines which candidates will appear. A candidate not placed on the ballot by the Secretary of State may petition for inclusion.[42]
  • North Carolina[43] - March 3 - The state Board of Elections determines which candidates will appear. A candidate not placed on the ballot by the Secretary of State may petition for inclusion.[44]
  • Oklahoma[45] - March 3 - A petition of at least one thousand signatures from each of the state's five congressional districts or a filing fee of $2500 is required to place a candidate on the primary ballot.[46]
  • Missouri[47] - March 10 - A filing fee of $1000 is required to place a candidate on the primary ballot.[48]
  • Arizona[49] - March 17 - A petition of at least 500 signatures is required to place candidate on the primary ballot.[50]
  • Delaware[51] - April 28 - A petition of at least 500 signatures is required to place candidate on the primary ballot.[52]
  • Indiana[53] - May 5 - A petition of at least 4,500 signatures is required to place a candidate on the primary ballot.[52]
  • Nebraska[54] - May 12 - The Secretary of State determines which candidates will appear. A candidate not placed on the ballot by the Secretary of State may petition for inclusion.[55]
  • West Virginia [56] - May 12 - A filing fee of $2500 is required to place a candidate on the primary ballot.[57]
  • Montana[58] - June 2 - A petition of at least 500 signatures is required to place candidate on the primary ballot.[59]
  • New Mexico[60] - June 2 - A state committee determines which candidates will appear. A candidate not placed on the ballot may petition for inclusion.[61]

Timeline[edit]

On July 22, 2013 libertarian activist Adam Kokesh became the first Libertarian Party candidate to announce their presidential bid for the 2020 election, the first presidential election he qualified for.[1]

During Gary Johnson's presidential campaign in 2016, Johnson often stated that it would be his last run for the presidency.[62]

Online straw polls[edit]

The following are early unofficial online polls that have included various speculative and potential candidates, including some that are not members of the Libertarian Party.

Poll source Date(s) Amash Byrne Campbell Foster Ince Istvan Johnson Kerbel Kokesh Lowe McAfee McCormick Miron Paul Perry Petersen Ruwart Sanford Sarwark Schiff Sharpe Ventura Weld Others
A Libertarian Future[63] November 2016 5% 0% 10% 1% 3% 0% 33% 1% 27% 6% 4% 9% None of the Above 1%
A Libertarian Future[64] March 2017 8% 0% 4% 2% 3% 0% 26% 1% 18% 1% 25% 3% 8% None of the Above 1%
TheJackNews[65] July 9–15, 2017 6% 6% 10.2% 10.2% 16% 43% Undecided 8%
TheJackNews[66] August 13–19, 2017 29.1% 2.9% 0.9% 3.9% 1.1% 2.8% 8.2% 28.5% 22.6% N/A
The Libertarian Vindicator[67] January 2–4, 2018 2% 0% 3% 6% 0% 9% 0% 1% 4% 8% 55% 6% None of the Above 6%

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k This individual is not a Libertarian Party member, but has been the subject of speculation and/or expressed interest in running under this party.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Adam Kokesh to Run for President in 2020". Independent Political Report. July 22, 2013. Retrieved October 29, 2015.
  2. ^ ""Don't vote John McAfee for President" says the John McAfee for President website". Crypto News Review. January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  3. ^ McCready, Dan. "Vermin Supreme Makes Announcement Regarding 2020 Presidential Race". YouTube. Retrieved May 31, 2018.
  4. ^ Kokesh, Adam (May 28, 2018). "Adam Kokesh vs Vermin Supreme 2020". YouTube. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  5. ^ "Libertarian presidential hopefuls: Now there are 2 … or 3?". LP.org. July 3, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  6. ^ On January 11, 2019, Istvan revealed that he had left the Libertarian Party a year ago, stating "the Libertarian Party is currently not for me.
  7. ^ Istvan, Zoltan (January 11, 2019). "January 11, 2019 Blog Post". Maven Round Table. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  8. ^ The Majority Report w/ Sam Seder, News w/ MR Team - MR Live - 1/2/19, retrieved January 9, 2019
  9. ^ "'Lowercase "L" Libertarian' Congressman Justin Amash is Another Potential 2020 Candidate". The Jack News. August 5, 2017. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  10. ^ Amash, Justin (April 10, 2016). "@Scottie_B_ When I'm president". Twitter.
  11. ^ "Justin Amash Should Run For President as a Libertarian". The Libertarian Vindicator. December 29, 2017. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  12. ^ [1][dead link]
  13. ^ "Presidential timber at CA Libertarian Convention". Libertarian Party USA. May 3, 2018.
  14. ^ [2][dead link]
  15. ^ Tang-Fu, Wang (August 11, 2017). "The Jack News: 'Cato Director Jeffrey Miron Has An Impressive Resume For A Potential 2020 Libertarian Candidate'". Independent Political Report.
  16. ^ Schiff, Peter (May 28, 2014). "Here Is When I Might Run For President". YouTube. Retrieved May 28, 2014.
  17. ^ "Joe Walsh Says He Will Run as the Libertarian Candiate for President If "Trump Screws Up"". Think Right Politics. December 17, 2016.
  18. ^ DeCosta-Klipa, Nick (May 3, 2018). "Is Bill Weld setting up a run for president in 2020?". Boston.com. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  19. ^ Will, George F. (June 20, 2018). "Can this libertarian restore conservatism?". Washington Post. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  20. ^ "Overstock.com's Patrick Byrne Is 'Almost Definitely' Not Going to Run for President". Reason. October 19, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  21. ^ Welch, Matt (December 6, 2016). "Read Why Your Fellow Commenters Donated to Reason's Webathon". Reason. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  22. ^ Welch, Matt (January 20, 2017). "Inauguration Radio w/ Matt Welch, Kmele Foster, Gene Healy & Others on Sirius XM Insight from 9–12 AM ET". Reason. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  23. ^ Kmele (October 26, 2018). "I've said it many times, in numerous places. My wife would divorce me. #itscheapertokeepher". Twitter.
  24. ^ "Gary Johnson says he won't run for president again". KRQE. November 9, 2016.
  25. ^ "Rep. Thomas Massie on Shakedowns, Cronyism-and Why He's Sticking With the GOP". Reason. July 25, 2018.
  26. ^ "Rand Paul dodges on if a 2020 primary would be good for GOP: 'I can't see myself supporting anyone but' Trump". Washington Examiner. October 30, 2017.
  27. ^ Kokesh, Adam (June 1, 2018). "A serious conversation with Vermin Supreme and Larry Sharpe". Adam Kokesh. YouTube. Retrieved June 1, 2018.
  28. ^ Seleh, Pardes (February 28, 2017). "Austin Petersen "optimistic" about Trump, may run for Senate as a Republican". Red Alert Politics. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  29. ^ Ruwart, Mary (January 3, 2019). "No, I won't be running in 2020 -- going to focus on writing!". Twitter.
  30. ^ Linker, Jacob (March 1, 2017). "The Next Step for Liberty: Mark Sanford 2020". Being Libertarian.
  31. ^ CNN, CNN (April 23, 2017). "Sanford on prospect of 2020 White House run". YouTube. Retrieved April 23, 2017.
  32. ^ [3][dead link]
  33. ^ Welch, Matt (December 12, 2018). "Is the Libertarian Party Glass Half Full or Half Empty? - Hit & Run". Reason.com.
  34. ^ "After New York Race, Larry Sharpe Might Seek 2020 Libertarian Nomination". August 9, 2017. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  35. ^ Kokesh, Adam (June 1, 2018). "A serious conversation with Vermin Supreme and Larry Sharpe". Adam Kokesh. YouTube. Retrieved June 1, 2018.
  36. ^ "Gary Johnson Will Not Run In 2020". The Libertarian Vidicator. November 8, 2017. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  37. ^ Ventura, Jesse (April 18, 2018). "Jesse Ventura/Cynthia McKinney 2020????". YouTube. Retrieved May 18, 2018.
  38. ^ "Libertarian Party May Have Record Number of Presidential Primaries in 2020". Ballot Access News.
  39. ^ "Political Parties". CAVotes.org. April 1, 2016.
  40. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in California". Ballotpedia.
  41. ^ "Elections: Massachusetts Directory of Political Parties and Designations". Sec.state.ma.us.
  42. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Massachusetts". Ballotpedia.
  43. ^ "Political parties in North Carolina". Ballotpedia.
  44. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in North Carolina". Ballotpedia.
  45. ^ "Oklahoma State Election Board - Political Party info". Ok.gov.
  46. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Oklahoma". Ballotpedia.
  47. ^ "Established Political Parties". Sos.mo.gov.
  48. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Missouri". Ballotpedia.
  49. ^ "Information about Recognized Political Parties - Arizona Secretary of State". azsos.gov.
  50. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Arizona". Ballotpedia.
  51. ^ "Political parties in Delaware". Ballotpedia.
  52. ^ a b "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Delaware". Ballotpedia.
  53. ^ "Political parties in Indiana". Ballotpedia.
  54. ^ "Political parties in Nebraska". Ballotpedia.
  55. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Nebraska". Ballotpedia.
  56. ^ "WV Secretary of State". sos.wv.gov.
  57. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in West Virginia". Ballotpedia.
  58. ^ "Political Parties – Montana Secretary of State – Corey Stapleton". Montana Secretary of State.
  59. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in Montana". Ballotpedia.
  60. ^ "NM Political Party Information". Sos.state.nm.us.
  61. ^ "Ballot access requirements for presidential candidates in New Mexico". Ballotpedia.
  62. ^ "Gary Johnson on Running in 2020 & Aleppo". October 20, 2016. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  63. ^ "POLL: Who Would You Support For The Libertarian Presidential Nom In 2020?". Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  64. ^ "POLL: Who Do You Support For The 2020 Libertarian Presidential Nomination?". Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  65. ^ "Jack Poll Results: 2020 Libertarian Party Presidential Preference". July 17, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  66. ^ "Three Front-Runners Emerge for the 2020 Libertarian Party Presidential Nomination". August 21, 2017. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  67. ^ "POLL RESULTS: Larry Sharpe Overwhelming Favorite; Kokesh Favorite Among Current Candidates". THE LIBERTARIAN VINDICATOR. January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018.