Virginia's 1st congressional district

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Virginia's 1st congressional district
Virginia US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Virginia's 1st congressional district boundaries from January 3, 2013 to January 3, 2017.
U.S. Representative
  Rob Wittman
RMontross
Distribution
  • 69.54[1]% urban
  • 30.46% rural
Population (2016)776,836[2]
Median income$88,049[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+8[4]

Virginia's first congressional district is a United States congressional district in the commonwealth of Virginia.

Virginian politicians now sometimes refer to it as "America's First District" since during the 20th century it included Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in the New World. However, Jamestown Island and the historic settlement were redistricted to the 2nd congressional district in 2017.[5][circular reference] Moreover, in the 18th and early 19th century, it comprised northwestern Virginia (that became Frederick County, Virginia as well as the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia after the American Civil War). For years, the first district also included the other two points of the Historic TriangleWilliamsburg, the longtime capital of the colony, and Yorktown, where the decisive battle of the Revolutionary War was fought. [6][7] The district continues to include major military installations, and has been represented by Republican Rob Wittman since 2007.

2016 redistricting[edit]

This image shows the 2016 court-ordered VA Congressional districts.

As of 2016, the adjacent 3rd district has been ruled unconstitutional. New districts have been drawn. [8][9]

Recent results in statewide elections[edit]

Year Office Results
1996 President Dole (R) 52–40%[10]
Senator Warner (R) 58–42%[11]
1997 Governor Gilmore (R) 60–38%[12]
Lieutenant Governor Hager (R) 55–40%[13]
Attorney General Earley (R) 62–38%[14]
2000 President Bush (R) 58–39%[15]
Senator Allen (R) 56–44%[16]
2001 Governor Earley (R) 51–49%[17]
Lieutenant Governor Katzen (R) 53–46%[18]
Attorney General Kilgore (R) 66–34%[19]
2002 Senator Warner 85–8–6%[20]
2004 President Bush 60–39%[21]
Representative Davis 79–20%[22]
2005 Governor Kilgore 51–46%[23]
Lieutenant Governor Bolling 56–43%[24]
Attorney General McDonnell 56–44%[25]
2006 Senator Allen 54–44%[26]
Representative Davis 63–35%[27]
2008 President McCain 51–48%[28]
Senator Warner 61–37%[29]
Representative Wittman 57–42%[30]
2009 Governor McDonnell 65–35%[31]
Lieutenant Governor Bolling 62–38%[32]
Attorney General Cuccinelli 58–42%[33]
2010 Representative Wittman 64–35%[34]
2012 President Romney 53–45%[35]
Senator Allen 53–47%[36]
Representative Wittman 56–41%[37]


2016 President Trump 53–40% [38]
Representative Wittman 60–37%[39]
2017 Governor Gillespie 54-44%[40]

Area covered[edit]

It covers all or part of the following political subdivisions:

Counties[edit]

Cities[edit]

The entirety of:

Historic district boundaries[edit]

The Virginia First District started in 1788 covering the counties of Berkeley, Frederick, Hampshire, Hardy, Harrison, Monongalia, Ohio, Randolph and Shenandoah.[41] Of these only Shenandoah and Frederick Counties are in Virginia today; the rest are now part of West Virginia. The modern counties of Clarke, Warren and most of Page as well as the independent city of Winchester were included as part of Frederick and Shenandoah counties in 1788. In West Virginia all the current state north and east of a generalized line running from Wood County to Pocahontas County was in the congressional district. The one exception was that Pendleton County, West Virginia was in Virginia's 3rd congressional district.

In the redistribution which followed the 1850 census (in force 1853–1863), the First District comprised sixteen counties in eastern Virginia. The counties included (amongst others) Accomack, Essex, Gloucester, James City, King and Queen, Mathews, Middlesex, New Kent, Richmond, Warwick and Westmoreland. In an 1862 Union special election three out of the sixteen counties in the Union district supplied returns.

The First District is noted for its strong presence of military institutions, including the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Increasing numbers of military and retired voters have swung the district to the right.[42]

Election results[edit]

Virginia's 1st congressional district election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican JoAnn Davis 151,344 57.5
Democratic Lawrence A. Davies 97,399 37.0
Independent Sharon A. Wood 9,652 3.7
Independent Josh Billings 4,082 1.6
Write-ins 537 0.2
Total votes 263,014 100.00
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st congressional district election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican JoAnn Davis (Incumbent) 113,168 95.9
Write-ins 4,829 4.1
Total votes 117,997 100.00
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican JoAnn Davis (Incumbent) 225,071 78.6
Independent William A. Lee 57,434 20.0
Write-ins 4,029 1.4
Total votes 286,534 100.00
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st congressional district election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican JoAnn Davis (Incumbent) 143,889 63.0
Democratic Shawn M. O'Donnell 81,083 35.5
Independent Marvin F. Pixton III 3,236 1.4
Write-ins 326 0.1
Total votes 228,534 100.00
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st congressional district special election, 2007[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman 42,772 60.8
Democratic Philip Forgit 26,282 37.3
Independent Lucky R. Narain 1,253 1.8
Write-ins 75 0.1
Total votes 70,382 100.00
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2008[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (Incumbent) 203,839 56.6
Democratic Bill Day 150,432 41.8
Libertarian Nathan Larson 5,265 1.5
Write-in 756 0.2
Total votes 360,292 100
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2010[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (Incumbent) 135,564 63.9
Democratic Krystal M. Ball 73,824 34.8
Independent Greens G. Gail Parker 2,544 1.2
Write-in 304 0.1
Total votes 212,236 100
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2012[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (Incumbent) 200,845 56.3
Democratic Adam M. Cook 147,036 41.2
Independent Greens G. Gail Parker 8,308 2.3
Write-in 617 0.2
Total votes 356,806 100
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2014[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (Incumbent) 131,851 62.9
Democratic Norm Mosher 72,054 34.4
Independent Greens G. Gail Parker 5,097 2.4
Write-in 604 0.3
Total votes 209,606 100
Republican hold
Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2016[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (Incumbent) 230,213 59.86
Democratic Matt Rowe 140,785 36.61
Independent Glenda Parker 12,866 3.35
Write-in 737 0.19
Total votes 384,601 100.00
Republican hold

List of members representing the district[edit]

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Alexander White Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
Elected in 1789.
Re-elected in 1790.
Lost re-election.
Robert Rutherford Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Elected in 1793.
Re-elected in 1795.
Lost re-election.
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
DanielMorgan.jpeg
Daniel Morgan
Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Elected in 1797.
Retired.
Robert Page Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
Elected in 1799.
Retired.
John Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1801.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
Johngeorgejackson.jpg
John G. Jackson
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
September 28, 1810
Elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1805.
Re-elected in 1807.
Re-elected in 1809.
Resigned.
Vacant September 29, 1810 –
December 20, 1810
William McKinley Democratic-Republican December 21, 1810 –
March 3, 1811
Elected in November 1810 to finish Jackson's term and seated December 21, 1810.
Lost re-election.
Thomas Wilson Federalist March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
Elected in 1811.
Lost re-election.
Johngeorgejackson.jpg
John G. Jackson
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
Elected in 1813.
Re-elected in 1815.
Retired.
James Pindall Federalist March 4, 1817 –
July 26, 1820
Elected in 1817.
Resigned.
Vacant July 27, 1820 –
October 22, 1820
Edward B. Jackson Democratic-Republican October 23, 1820 –
March 3, 1823
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Thomas Newton Jr. Adams-Clay D-R March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Election invalidated
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
Anti-Jackson March 4, 1829 –
March 9, 1830
George Loyall Jackson March 9, 1830 –
March 3, 1831
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Thomas Newton Jr. Anti-Jackson March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
George Loyall Jackson March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Francis Mallory Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Joel Holleman.jpg
Joel Holleman
Democratic March 4, 1839 –
December 1, 1840
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant December 2, 1840 –
December 27, 1840
Francis Mallory Whig December 28, 1840 –
March 3, 1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Archibald Atkinson Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1849
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
JohnMillson.jpg
John S. Millson
Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the Virginia's 2nd district.
Thomas H. Bayly Democratic March 4, 1853 –
June 23, 1856
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant June 24, 1856 –
November 30, 1856
MuscoeRHGarnett.jpg
Muscoe R. H. Garnett
Democratic December 1, 1856 –
March 3, 1861
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Vacant March 4, 1861 –
October 24, 1861
Joseph Segar.jpg
Joseph E. Segar
Unionist October 24, 1861 –
February 11, 1862
Elected late.
Declared by the House to be not entitled to the seat.[49]
Vacant February 11, 1862 –
March 16, 1862
Joseph Segar.jpg
Joseph E. Segar
Unionist March 16, 1862 –
May 17, 1864
Elected to finish his own term.[49]
Re-elected in 1863.
Declared by the House to be not entitled to the seat.[49]
Vacant May 17, 1864 –
January 30, 1870
Civil War
RichardSAyer.jpg
Richard S. Ayer
Republican January 31, 1870 –
March 3, 1871
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
John Critchery.jpg
John Critcher
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
James Sener.jpg
James B. Sener
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
BeverlyBDouglas.jpg
Beverly B. Douglas
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
December 22, 1878
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant December 23, 1878 –
January 22, 1879
Richard L. T. Beale - Brady-Handy.jpg
Richard L. T. Beale
Democratic January 23, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
George T. Garrison Democratic March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Robert M. Mayo Readjuster March 4, 1883 –
March 20, 1884
Election invalidated
George T. Garrison Democratic March 20, 1884 –
March 3, 1885
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Thomas Croxton Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Thomas H. B. Browne.jpg
Thomas H. B. Browne
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
William Atkinson Jones later years.jpg
William A. Jones
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
April 17, 1918
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant April 18 –
July 2, 1918
SOtisBland.jpg
S. Otis Bland
Democratic July 2, 1918 –
March 3, 1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the Virginia's at-Large district.
District eliminated March 4, 1933
District recreated January 3, 1935
SOtisBland.jpg
S. Otis Bland
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
February 16, 1950
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant February 16, 1950 –
May 2, 1950
Edward J. Robeson Jr. Democratic May 2, 1950 –
January 3, 1959
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost renomination.
Thomas N. Downing.jpg
Thomas N. Downing
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1977
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
PaulSTrible.jpg
Paul Trible
Republican January 3, 1977 –
January 3, 1983
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
HerbertBateman.jpg
Herbert H. Bateman
Republican January 3, 1983 –
September 11, 2000
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant September 11, 2000 –
January 3, 2001
Jo ann davis 2.jpg
Jo Ann Davis
Republican January 3, 2001 –
October 6, 2007
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant October 6, 2007 –
December 11, 2007
Rob Wittman official congressional photo.jpg
Rob Wittman
Republican December 11, 2007 –
Present
Incumbent

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003–2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  2. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=51&cd=01
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Virginia's congressional districts#2016 redistricting
  6. ^ "Expressing Sorrow of the House at the Death of the Honorable Herbert H. Bateman, Member of Congress from the Commonwealth of Virginia". Congressional Record. Government Printing Office. September 12, 2000. Retrieved December 22, 2012.
  7. ^ "Expressing the Condolences of the House of Representatives on the Death of the Honorable Jo Ann Davis, A Representative from the Commonwealth of Virginia". Congressional Record. Government Printing Office. October 9, 2007. Retrieved December 22, 2012.
  8. ^ "Virginia Politics: Court orders redistricting". Daily Press. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  9. ^ By $${element.Contributor} (2016-01-07). "Judges Select New Virginia Congressional Map". Rollcall.com. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  10. ^ "November 5, 1996 General Election For Office of PRESIDENT/VICE PRESIDENT of the United States". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  11. ^ "November 5, 1996 General Election For Office of UNITED STATES SENATE". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  12. ^ "NOVEMBER 4, 1997 GENERAL ELECTION For Office of Governor". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  13. ^ "NOVEMBER 4, 1997 GENERAL ELECTION For Office of Lieutenant Governor". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  14. ^ "NOVEMBER 4, 1997 GENERAL ELECTION For Office of Attorney General". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  15. ^ "November 7th – General Election". Virginia State Board of Elections. November 20, 2000. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  16. ^ "November 7th – General Election". Virginia State Board of Elections. November 20, 2000. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  17. ^ "Official Results: Governor". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  18. ^ "Official Results: Lieutenant Governor". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  19. ^ "Official Results: Attorney General". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  20. ^ "Official Results/U.S. Senate". General Election Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. November 5, 2002. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  21. ^ "Official Results/President". Commonwealth of Virginia/November 2nd – General Election. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on December 28, 2012. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  22. ^ "Official Results/U.S. House of Representatives". Commonwealth of Virginia/November 2nd – General Election. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on December 28, 2012. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  23. ^ "Official Results/Governor". General Election – November 8, 2005. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  24. ^ "Official Results/Lieutenant Governor". General Election – November 8, 2005. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  25. ^ "Official Results/Attorney General". General Election – November 8, 2005. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  26. ^ "Official Results/U.S. Senate". General Election – November 7, 2006. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on August 13, 2013. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  27. ^ "Official Results/U.S. House of Representatives". General Election – November 7, 2006. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on August 13, 2013. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  28. ^ "President>President And Vice President>Votes By District". November 2008 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  29. ^ "Congress>U.S. Senate>United States Senate>Votes By District". November 2008 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  30. ^ "U.S. House of Representatives". November 2008 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  31. ^ "Governor>Votes by District". November 2009 General Election Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  32. ^ "Lieutenant Governor>Votes by District". November 2009 General Election Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  33. ^ "Attorney General>Votes by District". November 2009 General Election Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  34. ^ "U.S. House of Representatives". November 2, 2010 General and Special Elections Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  35. ^ "President>President And Vice President>Votes By District". November 2012 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  36. ^ "Congress>U.S. Senate>United States Senate>Votes By District". November 2012 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  37. ^ "U.S. House of Representatives". November 2012 Official Results. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on May 12, 2013. Retrieved March 2, 2013.
  38. ^ "2016 November General President".
  39. ^ "2016 November General Congress". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  40. ^ "2017 Governor's Election Results by Congressional District". The Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2018-06-16.
  41. ^ Parsons, Stanley B., William W. Beach and Dan Hermann. United States Congressional Districts, 1788–1841 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978) p. 7
  42. ^ "Virginia 1st District". National Journal Almanac. National Journal Group Inc. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  43. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  44. ^ "STATISTICS OF THE PRESIDENTIAL AND CONGRESSIONAL ELECTION OF November 4, 2008" (PDF). Retrieved May 6, 2017.
  45. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2010election.pdf
  46. ^ "November 6, 2012 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on May 12, 2013. Retrieved December 14, 2012.
  47. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 7, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  48. ^ "2016 November General". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved May 6, 2017.
  49. ^ a b c http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=S000227

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°51′08″N 76°54′24″W / 37.85222°N 76.90667°W / 37.85222; -76.90667