Lamar County, Alabama

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Lamar County, Alabama
LamarCoALCourthouse.jpg
Lamar County Courthouse in Vernon
Map of Alabama highlighting Lamar County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded February 8, 1877
Named for Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar
Seat Vernon
Largest city Sulligent
Area
 • Total 605 sq mi (1,567 km2)
 • Land 605 sq mi (1,567 km2)
 • Water 0.6 sq mi (2 km2), (0.1%)
Population
 • (2010) 14,564
 • Density 24/sq mi (9/km²)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.lamarcounty.com

Lamar County (formerly Jones County and Sanford County) is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,564.[1] Its county seat is Vernon and is a prohibition or dry county.[2] Its name is in honor of Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar, member of the United States Senate from Mississippi.

History[edit]

Jones County, Alabama was established on February 4, 1867, with land taken from the southern part of Marion County and the western part of Fayette County, and it was named for E. P. Jones of Fayette County, with its county seat at Vernon. This county was abolished on November 13, 1867. On October 8, 1868, the area was again organized into a county, but as Covington County had been renamed "Jones County" the same year (a change that lasted only a few months),[3] the new county was named Sanford, in honor of H. C. Sanford of Cherokee County. On February 8, 1877, the county was renamed Lamar in honor of Senator L.Q.C. Lamar of Mississippi.

Newspapers[edit]

  • The Vernon Pioneer - (1875–1878) The first newspaper published in Lamar County was The Vernon Pioneer. The Editors and Proprietors included William R. Smith, William R. Smith Jr., Smith, McCullough & Co, Sid B. Smith, and Don R. Aldridge.
  • The Vernon Clipper - (1879–1880) - Alexander Cobb as Editor and Proprietor and later Alex A. Wall as Proprietor.
  • The Lamar News - (1886–1887) - E. J. McNatt as Editor and Proprietor
  • The Sulligent Lightning
  • The Vernon Courier - (1886–1890) - Alex A. Wall as Editor and Publisher, then Courier Publishing Co. (R. J. Young as Editor-in-Chief and Mollie C. Young as partner)
  • The Eagle-Eye (1894)
  • The Lamar Democrat (1901 - present)
  • The Rural Educator (1908)
  • The Sulligent News (1942–1952)

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 605 square miles (1,570 km2), of which 605 square miles (1,570 km2) is land and 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2) (0.1%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Cemeteries[edit]

  • Blooming Grove Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Christian Chapel Church of Christ Cemetery
  • Fellowship Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Furnace Hill Cemetery
  • Kennedy Town Cemetery
  • Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Macedonia Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Meadow Branch Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Mount Olive Church of Christ Cemetery
  • Old Mount Nebo Cemetery
  • Shiloh (Pinhook) United Methodist Church Cemetery
  • Sulligent City Cemetery
  • Vernon City Cemetery
  • Providence United Methodist Cemetery
  • Union Chapel Church Cemetery near Crossville
  • Morton Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery near Vernon
  • Fairview Church Cemetery
  • Lebanon United Methodist Church Cemetery
  • Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Old Liberty Church Cemetery
  • South Carolina Church Cemetery near Hightogy

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Rail[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 8,893
1880 12,142 36.5%
1890 14,187 16.8%
1900 16,084 13.4%
1910 17,487 8.7%
1920 18,149 3.8%
1930 18,001 −0.8%
1940 19,708 9.5%
1950 16,441 −16.6%
1960 14,271 −13.2%
1970 14,335 0.4%
1980 16,453 14.8%
1990 15,715 −4.5%
2000 15,904 1.2%
2010 14,564 −8.4%
Est. 2013 14,236 −2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 15,904 people, 6,468 households, and 4,715 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km2). There were 7,517 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 86.87% White, 11.98% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.46% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. 1.30% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,468 households out of which 31.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.60% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.10% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.60% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 15.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,059, and the median income for a family was $33,050. Males had a median income of $30,453 versus $18,947 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,435. About 13.30% of families and 16.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.10% of those under age 18 and 18.60% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated community[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Alabama Counties: Covington County". Alabama Counties: Covington County. Alabama Department of Archives and History. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°46′50″N 88°05′47″W / 33.78056°N 88.09639°W / 33.78056; -88.09639