United States congressional delegations from Arizona

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These are complete tables of congressional delegations from Arizona to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

Due to Arizona's explosive growth since it joined the Union in 1912, the state has undergone too much demographic change for some districts to be seen as a continuation of the same numbered district before reapportionment. For instance, Trent Franks has represented the 2nd District since 2003 and will represent the 8th District starting in 2013, but is considered the successor of Bob Stump because his district contains most of the territory Stump represented in the 3rd District prior to 2003.

Arizona’s current delegation

United States Senate[edit]

Class 1 Congress Class 3
Henry Fountain Ashurst (D)   62nd (1912–1913)   Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)  
  65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)   Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
  68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)   Carl Hayden (D)
  71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)  
  74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)  
Ernest W. McFarland (D)   77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947)  
  80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)  
Barry Goldwater (R)   83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)  
  86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)  
Paul Jones Fannin (R)   89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)   Barry Goldwater (R)
  92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)  
Dennis DeConcini (D)   95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)  
  98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)   John McCain (R)
  101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)  
Jon Kyl (R)   104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)  
  107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)  
  110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013)  
Jeff Flake (R)   113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)

House of Representatives[edit]

1863 – 1912: 1 non-voting delegate[edit]

Congress Delegate
38th
(1863–1865)
Charles Debrille Poston (R)
39th
(1865–1867)
John Noble Goodwin (R)
40th
(1867–1869)
Coles Bashford (I)
41st
(1869–1871)
Richard Cunningham McCormick (U)
42nd
(1871–1873)
43rd
(1873–1875)
44th
(1875–1877)
Hiram Sanford Stevens (D)
45th
(1877–1879)
46th
(1879–1881)
John Goulder Campbell (D)
47th
(1881–1883)
Granville Henderson Oury (D)
48th
(1883–1885)
49th
(1885–1887)
Curtis Coe Bean (R)
50th
(1887–1889)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
51st
(1889–1891)
52nd
(1891–1893)
53rd
(1893–1895)
54th
(1895–1897)
Nathan Oakes Murphy (R)
55th
(1897–1899)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
56th
(1899–1901)
John Frank Wilson (D)
57th
(1901–1903)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
58th
(1903–1905)
John Frank Wilson (D)
59th
(1905–1907)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
60th
(1907–1909)
61st
(1909–1911)
Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
62nd
(1911–1912)

1912 – 1943: 1 seat[edit]

Congress At-large
62nd
(1912–1913)
Carl Hayden (D)
63rd
(1913–1915)
64th
(1915–1917)
65th
(1917–1919)
66th
(1919–1921)
67th
(1921–1923)
68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
70th
(1927–1929)
Lewis W. Douglas[1] (D)
71st
(1929–1931)
72nd
(1931–1933)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Isabella Selmes Greenway[2] (D)
74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
John R. Murdock (D)
76th
(1939–1941)
77th
(1941–1943)

1943 – 1963: 2 seats[edit]

After the 1940 census, a second seat was added. For six years, the seats were elected at-large statewide on a general ticket. In 1949, districts were used.

Congress Elected state-wide on a General ticket
1st seat 2nd seat
78th
(1943–1945)
John R. Murdock (D) Richard F. Harless (D)
79th
(1945–1947)
80th
(1947–1949)
Districts
1st 2nd
81st
(1949–1951)
John R. Murdock (D) Harold A. Patten (D)
82nd
(1951–1953)
83rd
(1953–1955)
John Jacob Rhodes (R)
84th
(1955–1957)
Stewart Lee Udall (D)
85th
(1957–1959)
86th
(1959–1961)
87th
(1961–1963)
 
  Mo Udall (D)

1963 – 1973: 3 seats[edit]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd
88th
(1963–1965)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) George Frederick Senner, Jr. (D)
89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
Sam Steiger (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)

1973 – 1983: 4 seats[edit]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
93rd
(1973–1975)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) Sam Steiger (R) John Bertrand Conlan (R)
94th
(1975–1977)
95th
(1977–1979)
Bob Stump (D) Eldon D. Rudd (R)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
 
  Bob Stump (R)

1983 – 1993: 5 seats[edit]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
98th
(1983–1985)
John McCain (R) Mo Udall[1] (D) Bob Stump (R) Eldon D. Rudd (R) James Francis McNulty, Jr. (D)
99th
(1985–1987)
Jim Kolbe (R)
100th
(1987–1989)
John Jacob Rhodes III (R) Jon Kyl (R)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
 
  Ed Pastor (D)

1993 – 2003: 6 seats[edit]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
103rd
(1993–1995)
Samuel G. Coppersmith (D) Ed Pastor (D) Bob Stump (R) Jon Kyl (R) Jim Kolbe (R) Karan English (D)
104th
(1995–1997)
Matt Salmon (R) John B. Shadegg (R) J. D. Hayworth (R)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
Jeff Flake (R)

2003 – 2013: 8 seats[edit]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
108th
(2003–2005)
Rick Renzi (R) Trent Franks (R) John B. Shadegg (R) Ed Pastor (D) J. D. Hayworth (R) Jeff Flake (R) Raúl M. Grijalva (D) Jim Kolbe (R)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
Harry Mitchell (D) Gabrielle Giffords[1] (D)
111th
(2009–2011)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D)
112th
(2011–2013)
  Paul Gosar (R) Ben Quayle (R) David Schweikert (R)
  Ron Barber (D)

2013 – 2023: 9 seats[edit]

After the 2010 Census, Arizona gained one seat.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
113th
(2013–2015)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D) Ron Barber (D) Raul Grijalva (D) Paul Gosar (R) Matt Salmon (R) David Schweikert (R) Ed Pastor (D) Trent Franks (R) Kyrsten Sinema (D)
114th
(2015–2017)
Martha McSally (R) Ruben Gallego (D)

Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Arizona[edit]

As of April 2015, there are fifteen former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from the U.S. State of Arizona who are currently living at this time.

Representative Term of office District Date of birth (and age)
John Bertrand Conlan 1973–1977 4th (1930-09-17) September 17, 1930 (age 84)
John McCain 1983–1987 1st (1936-08-29) August 29, 1936 (age 78)
Jim Kolbe 1985–2007 5th (1985–2003)
8th (2003–2007)
(1942-06-28) June 28, 1942 (age 72)
Jon Kyl 1987–1995 4th (1942-04-25) April 25, 1942 (age 73)
Ed Pastor 1991–2015 2nd (1991–2003)
4th (2003–2013)
7th (2013–2015)
(1943-06-28) June 28, 1943 (age 71)
Sam Coppersmith 1993–1995 1st (1955-05-22) May 22, 1955 (age 60)
Karan English 1993–1995 6th (1949-03-23) March 23, 1949 (age 66)
J. D. Hayworth 1995–2007 6th (1995–2003)
5th (2003–2007)
(1958-07-12) July 12, 1958 (age 56)
John Shadegg 1995 - 2011 4th (1995–2003)
3rd (2003–2011)
(1949-10-22) October 22, 1949 (age 65)
Jeff Flake 2001–2013 1st (2001–2003)
6th (2003–2013)
(1962-12-31) December 31, 1962 (age 52)
Rick Renzi 2003–2009 1st (1958-06-11) June 11, 1958 (age 56)
Harry Mitchell 2007–2011 5th (1940-07-18) July 18, 1940 (age 74)
Gabrielle Giffords 2007–2012 8th (1970-06-08) June 8, 1970 (age 44)
Ben Quayle 2011–2013 3rd (1976-11-05) November 5, 1976 (age 38)
Ron Barber 2012–2015 8th (2012–2013)
2nd (2013–2015)
(1945-08-25) August 25, 1945 (age 69)

Living former U.S. Senators from Arizona[edit]

As of April 2015, there are two former U.S. Senators from the U.S. State of Arizona who are currently living at this time, two from Class 1.

Senator Term of office Class Date of birth (and age)
Dennis DeConcini 1977–1995 1 (1937-05-08) May 8, 1937 (age 78)
Jon Kyl 1995–2013 1 (1942-04-25) April 25, 1942 (age 73)

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Resigned
  2. ^ Elected to fill the vacancy caused by the previous representative being elected to the next term, but resigning before the term began.

Key[edit]

Key to party COLORS and ABBREVIATIONS for Members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know-Nothing) (K-N)
Adams (A),
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J),
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Conservative (Con)
Democratic (D)
Dixiecrat (Dix),
States' rights (SR)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer-Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Fusion (FU)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Non-Partisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N)
Opposition (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)


Independent,
or None,
or Unaffiliated