Atchison County, Missouri

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Atchison County
Atchison County Memorial Building
Map of Missouri highlighting Atchison County
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°26′N 95°26′W / 40.43°N 95.43°W / 40.43; -95.43
Country United States
State Missouri
FoundedFebruary 14, 1845
Named forDavid Rice Atchison
SeatRock Port
Largest cityTarkio
Area
 • Total550 sq mi (1,400 km2)
 • Land547 sq mi (1,420 km2)
 • Water2.8 sq mi (7 km2)  0.5%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total5,305
 • Density9.6/sq mi (3.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.atchisoncounty.org
Atchison County Courthouse in Rock Port

Atchison County is the northwesternmost county in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2020 census, the county had a population of 5,305.[1] Its county seat is Rock Port.[2] It was originally known as Allen County when it was detached from Holt County in 1843.[3] The county was officially organized on February 14, 1845, and named for U.S. Senator David Rice Atchison from Missouri.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 550 square miles (1,400 km2), of which 547 square miles (1,420 km2) is land and 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) (0.5%) is water.[5]

Atchison's western boundary for the most part is the Missouri River and Nebraska. An 1867 flood straightened a bend in the river north of Watson. Both Nebraska and Missouri claimed the 5,000 acre McKissick Island that extends almost two miles into Atchison County. The Supreme Court in 1904 decided that the land belongs to Nebraska. The only way Nebraskans can reach it by road is to cross the Missouri River and then travel through Missouri.[6]

The State Line Slough (Missouri) stream is in Atchison County.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,678
18604,649177.1%
18708,44081.5%
188014,55672.5%
189015,5336.7%
190016,5016.2%
191013,604−17.6%
192013,008−4.4%
193013,4213.2%
194012,897−3.9%
195011,127−13.7%
19609,213−17.2%
19709,2400.3%
19808,605−6.9%
19907,457−13.3%
20006,430−13.8%
20105,685−11.6%
20205,305−6.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2015[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 6,430 people, 2,722 households, and 1,777 families residing in the county. The population density was 12 people per square mile (5/km2). There were 3,103 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.00% White, 2.05% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.31% from other races, and 0.31% from two or more races. Approximately 0.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,722 households, out of which 26.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.80% were married couples living together, 6.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.70% were non-families. 31.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.10% under the age of 18, 6.50% from 18 to 24, 24.20% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 21.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 99.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,959, and the median income for a family was $38,279. Males had a median income of $27,468 versus $18,855 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,956. About 9.30% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.70% of those under age 18 and 12.40% of those age 65 or over.

Religion[edit]

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2010), Atchison County is sometimes regarded as being on the northern edge of the Bible Belt, although mainline Protestantism is the most predominant religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Atchison County who adhere to a religion are United Methodists (29.93%), Lutherans (LCMC) (22.16%), and Southern Baptists (14.33%).

Education[edit]

Public Schools[edit]

Private Schools[edit]

  • Tarkio Academy – Tarkio (07-12) – Nonsectarian (All Boys) - closed

Public Libraries[edit]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

The Republican Party controls politics at the local level in Atchison County. Republicans hold all but two of the elected positions in the county.

Atchison County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Lori Brown Jones Democratic
Circuit Clerk Lorie Hall Republican
County Clerk Susette M. Taylor Republican
Collector Diane Livengood Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Curtis Livengood Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
James Quimby Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Richard C. Burke Democratic
Coroner Shawn Minter Jr. Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Brett Hurst Republican
Public Administrator Teresa Jayne Scott Republican
Recorder Eliza Beasing Republican
Sheriff Dennis D. Martin Republican
Treasurer Debbie True Republican

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 78.38% 2,171 19.24% 533 2.38% 66
2016 65.22% 1,746 31.45% 842 3.33% 89
2012 49.83% 1,319 46.85% 1,240 3.32% 88
2008 45.93% 1,336 50.22% 1,461 3.85% 112
2004 63.65% 1,973 34.90% 1,082 1.45% 45
2000 57.05% 1,610 41.42% 1,169 1.53% 43
1996 37.36% 1,111 61.13% 1,818 1.51% 45
1992 50.70% 1,604 49.30% 1,560 0.00% 0

All of Atchison County is a part of Missouri's 1st District in the Missouri House of Representatives and is represented by Allen Andrews (R-Grant City).

Missouri's House of Representatives — District 1 — Atchison County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Allen Andrews 2,575 100.00% +17.73
Missouri House of Representatives — District 1 — Atchison County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Allen Andrews 1,819 82.27% -17.73
Democratic Paul Taylor 392 17.73% +17.73

All of Atchison County is a part of Missouri's 12th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Dan Hegeman (R-Cosby).

Missouri Senate — District 12 — Atchison County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dan Hegeman 1,722 78.63% -21.37
Democratic Terry Richard 468 21.37% +21.37
Missouri Senate — District 12 — Atchison County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dan Hegeman 1,601 100.00%

Federal[edit]

All of Atchison County is included in Missouri's 6th Congressional District and is currently represented by Sam Graves (R-Tarkio) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Graves was elected to an eleventh term in 2020 over Democratic challenger Gena Ross.

U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri’s 6th Congressional District – Atchison County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sam Graves 2,257 81.39% +4.53
Democratic Gena L. Ross 444 16.01% -3.66
Libertarian Jim Higgins 72 2.60% -0.87
U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri's 6th Congressional District – Atchison County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sam Graves 1,704 76.86% -0.16
Democratic Henry Robert Martin 436 19.67% +0.20
Libertarian Dan Hogan 77 3.47% +0.97

Atchison County, along with the rest of the state of Missouri, is represented in the U.S. Senate by Josh Hawley (R-Columbia) and Roy Blunt (R-Strafford).

U.S. Senate – Class I – Atchison County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Josh Hawley 1,619 72.70% +22.40
Democratic Claire McCaskill 542 24.34% -19.02
Libertarian Japheth Campbell 36 1.62% -4.72
Independent Craig O'Dear 15 0.67%
Green Jo Crain 15 0.67% +0.67

Blunt was elected to a second term in 2016 over then-Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

U.S. Senate — Class III — Atchison County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt 1,861 69.57% +19.27
Democratic Jason Kander 704 26.32% -17.04
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 72 2.69% -3.35
Green Johnathan McFarland 19 0.71% +0.71
Constitution Fred Ryman 19 0.71% +0.71

Political culture[edit]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 77.5% 2,119 20.6% 564 1.9% 51
2016 75.5% 2,060 19.8% 541 4.7% 129
2012 70.2% 1,902 27.9% 756 1.9% 51
2008 65.1% 1,936 33.6% 1,000 1.3% 40
2004 67.7% 2,137 31.8% 1,005 0.4% 14
2000 62.6% 1,798 35.3% 1,013 2.1% 60
1996 44.6% 1,327 42.5% 1,266 12.9% 385
1992 35.6% 1,140 37.8% 1,208 26.6% 851
1988 54.4% 1,761 45.3% 1,468 0.3% 10
1984 65.1% 2,277 34.9% 1,219
1980 58.9% 2,096 35.8% 1,273 5.3% 187
1976 49.9% 1,960 49.0% 1,926 1.1% 44
1972 66.0% 2,927 34.0% 1,509
1968 51.4% 2,206 40.8% 1,752 7.9% 337
1964 36.6% 1,653 63.5% 2,870
1960 55.1% 2,659 44.9% 2,167
1956 54.5% 2,774 45.6% 2,321
1952 61.5% 3,259 38.3% 2,028 0.2% 10
1948 46.7% 2,190 53.2% 2,498 0.1% 5
1944 55.8% 2,803 44.1% 2,214 0.1% 4
1940 52.3% 3,322 47.6% 3,025 0.2% 11
1936 46.8% 3,044 53.1% 3,452 0.1% 7
1932 37.1% 2,155 62.3% 3,617 0.6% 34
1928 56.0% 3,239 43.8% 2,535 0.2% 12
1924 49.3% 2,710 47.6% 2,617 3.2% 174
1920 58.7% 3,236 40.4% 2,227 0.9% 51
1916 48.1% 1,626 50.2% 1,697 1.7% 56
1912 34.5% 1,138 46.5% 1,534 19.0% 625
1908 49.7% 1,700 48.2% 1,651 2.1% 72
1904 52.8% 1,839 43.2% 1,506 4.0% 141
1900 46.0% 1,767 50.1% 1,926 3.9% 149
1896 40.6% 1,587 58.2% 2,272 1.2% 46
1892 32.0% 1,093 33.6% 1,147 34.5% 1,178[13]
1888 46.2% 1,554 43.5% 1,465 10.3% 347

At the presidential level, Atchison County is solidly Republican. Atchison County strongly favored Donald Trump in both 2016 and 2020. Bill Clinton was the last Democratic presidential nominee to carry Atchison County in 1992 with a plurality of the vote, and a Democrat hasn't won majority support from the county's voters in a presidential election since Lyndon Johnson in 1964.

Like most rural areas throughout northwest Missouri, voters in Atchison County generally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles which tend to influence their Republican leanings. In 2018, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition A) concerning right to work, the outcome of which ultimately reversed the right to work legislation passed in the state the previous year. However, 57.61% of Atchison County voters cast their ballots to keep the law.

Missouri presidential preference primaries[edit]

2020[edit]

The 2020 presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties were held in Missouri on March 10. On the Democratic side, former Vice President Joe Biden (D-Delaware) both won statewide and carried Atchison County by a wide margin. Biden went on to defeat President Donald Trump in the general election.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Biden 211 66.98
Democratic Bernie Sanders 86 27.30
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 4 1.27
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 14 4.44

Incumbent President Donald Trump (R-Florida) faced a primary challenge from former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, but won both Atchison County and statewide by large margins.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 454 98.06
Republican Bill Weld 5 1.08
Republican Others/Uncommitted 4 0.86

2016[edit]

The 2016 presidential primaries for both the Republican and Democratic parties were held in Missouri on March 15. Businessman Donald Trump (R-New York) narrowly won the state overall and carried a plurality of the vote in Atchison County. He went on to win the presidency.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 487 43.68
Republican Ted Cruz 325 29.15
Republican Marco Rubio 135 12.11
Republican John Kasich 123 11.03
Republican Others/Uncommitted 45 4.04

On the Democratic side, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) carried Atchison County, but former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (D-New York) won statewide by a small margin. Clinton won the nomination that year.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 173 54.57
Democratic Hillary Clinton 141 44.48
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 3 0.95

2012[edit]

The 2012 Missouri Republican Presidential Primary's results were nonbinding on the state's national convention delegates. Voters in Atchison County supported former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum (R-Pennsylvania), who finished first in the state at large, but eventually lost the nomination to former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts). Delegates to the congressional district and state conventions were chosen at a county caucus, which selected a delegation favoring Santorum. Incumbent President Barack Obama easily won the Missouri Democratic Primary and renomination. He defeated Romney in the general election.

2008[edit]

In 2008, the Missouri Republican Presidential Primary was closely contested, with Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) prevailing and eventually winning the nomination.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican John McCain 281 37.92
Republican Mitt Romney 230 31.04
Republican Mike Huckabee 189 25.51
Republican Ron Paul 25 3.37
Republican Others/Uncommitted 16 2.15

Then-Senator Hillary Clinton (D-New York) received more votes than any candidate from either party in Atchison County during the 2008 presidential primary. Despite initial reports that Clinton had won Missouri, Barack Obama (D-Illinois), also a Senator at the time, narrowly defeated her statewide and later became that year's Democratic nominee, going on to win the presidency.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Atchison County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Hillary Clinton 347 54.73
Democratic Barack Obama 262 41.32
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 25 3.94

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Village[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Atchison County is divided into 11 townships:

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Disappearing Missouri Names". The Kansas City Star. March 19, 1911. p. 15. Retrieved August 15, 2014 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp. 202.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  6. ^ https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:jxQJS0nNWG4J:www.midlandsurvey.com/Downloads/MS_McKissickIsland_NationalArchive_2010.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShfS9h3cA9u0GilN1vitrrU5l6JQgYcuzzJeAkLdhNiw1QKXX0mvbusIW0f0GslfY314UOK1NUsWPNzXiw3ASZ2Qp142OVqyy1BaE9SvFdnSnS6KM2M8mgXkeOyyji2sXbfs_l2&sig=AHIEtbRGueCR6Zt2VK4-7Gv4dZA4sN4Glg
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  13. ^ There were only 1,114 votes for the leading "other" candidate, Populist James Weaver, plus 64 for the Prohibition Party's John Bidwell.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°26′N 95°26′W / 40.43°N 95.43°W / 40.43; -95.43