Boone County, Missouri

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Coordinates: 38°57′06″N 92°19′43″W / 38.951561°N 92.328638°W / 38.951561; -92.328638 (Boone County, Missouri)

Boone County
The Big Tree in the Missouri River floodplain near the City of Columbia
The Big Tree in the Missouri River floodplain near the City of Columbia
Official seal of Boone County
Map of Missouri highlighting Boone County
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°56′54″N 92°20′02″W / 38.9483°N 92.3339°W / 38.9483; -92.3339
Country United States
State Missouri
FoundedNovember 16, 1820
Named forDaniel Boone
SeatColumbia, Missouri Columbia
Largest cityColumbia, Missouri Columbia
Area
 • Total691 sq mi (1,790 km2)
 • Land685 sq mi (1,770 km2)
 • Water5.6 sq mi (15 km2)  0.8%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total183,610
 • Density270/sq mi (100/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitewww.showmeboone.com

Boone County is located in the U.S. state of Missouri. Centrally located in Mid-Missouri, its county seat is Columbia, Missouri's fourth-largest city and location of the University of Missouri. As of the 2020 census, the population was 183,610,[1] making it the state's eighth-most populous county. The county was organized November 16, 1820 and named for the then recently deceased Daniel Boone, whose kin largely populated the Boonslick area, having arrived in the 1810s on the Boone's Lick Road.[2] Boone County comprises the Columbia Metropolitan Area. The towns of Ashland and Centralia are the second and third most populous towns in the county.

History[edit]

Boone County was organized November 16, 1820, from a portion of the territorial Howard County. The area was then known as Boone's Lick Country, because of a salt lick which Daniel Boone's sons used for their stock.

The Boone County Courthouse at the Boone County Government Complex

Boone County was settled primarily from the Upper South states of Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The settlers brought slaves and slave-holding with them, and quickly started cultivating crops similar to those in Middle Tennessee and Kentucky: hemp and tobacco. Boone was one of several counties to the north and south of the Missouri River that was settled by southerners. Because of its culture and traditions, the area became known as Little Dixie, and Boone County was at its heart.[3] In 1860 slaves made up 25 percent or more of the county's population, Boone County was strongly pro-Confederate during the American Civil War.[4]

Shortly after the murder of President Lincoln, the leading citizens of the county denounced the killing. They also directed that all public buildings including the courthouse and the university be draped in mourning for thirty days.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 691 square miles (1,790 km2), of which 685 square miles (1,770 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (0.8%) is water.[6] The Missouri River makes up the southern border of the county.

National protected area[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18203,692
18308,859140.0%
184013,56153.1%
185014,97910.5%
186019,48630.1%
187020,7656.6%
188025,42222.4%
189026,0432.4%
190028,64210.0%
191030,5336.6%
192029,672−2.8%
193030,9954.5%
194034,99112.9%
195048,43238.4%
196055,20214.0%
197080,91146.6%
1980100,37624.1%
1990112,37912.0%
2000135,45420.5%
2010162,64220.1%
2020183,61012.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2020[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 135,454 people, 53,094 households, and 31,378 families residing in the county. The population density was 198 people per square mile (76/km2). There were 56,678 housing units at an average density of 83 per square mile (32/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 85.43% White, 8.54% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 2.96% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 1.93% from two or more races. Approximately 1.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.6% claimed German, 12.3% American, 11.2% English and 9.8% Irish ancestry.

There were 53,094 households, out of which 30.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.50% were married couples living together, 10.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.90% were non-families. 28.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.80% under the age of 18, 19.90% from 18 to 24, 29.90% from 25 to 44, 18.80% from 45 to 64, and 8.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,485, and the median income for a family was $51,210. Males had a median income of $33,304 versus $25,990 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,844. About 7.60% of families and 14.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.10% of those under age 18 and 5.90% of those age 65 or over.

There are 121,319 registered voters.[13]

Religion[edit]

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2010), Boone County is sometimes regarded as being on the northern edge of the Bible Belt, with evangelical Protestantism being the most predominant religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Boone County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (20.81%), Roman Catholics (16.71%), and nondenominational evangelical groups (13.23%).

2020 Census[edit]

Boone County Racial Composition[14]
Race Num. Perc.
White (NH) 137,771 75%
Black or African American (NH) 17,882 9.7%
Native American (NH) 452 0.3%
Asian (NH) 7,772 4.23%
Pacific Islander (NH) 120 0.07%
Other/Mixed (NH) 11,561 6.3%
Hispanic or Latino 8,052 4.4%

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

  • Ashland R-I School District*
    • Southern Boone Elementary
    • Southern Boone Middle School
    • Southern Boone High School
  • Centralia R-VI School District – Centralia
    • Chance Elementary School (PK-02)
    • Centralia Intermediate School (03-05)
    • Chester Boren Middle School (06-08)
    • Centralia High School (09-12)
  • Columbia School District No. 93 – Columbia
    • Center for Gifted Education (01-05)
    • Cedar Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Thomas Benton Elementary School (PK-05)
    • John Ridgeway Elementary School (K-05)
    • Eugene Field/ Alpha Hart Lewis Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Midway Heights Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Ulysses S. Grant Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Two Mile Prairie Elementary School (PK-05)
    • New Haven Elementary School (PK-05)
    • West Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Locust Street Expressive Arts Elementary School
    • Parkade Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Blue Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Fairview Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Russell Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Shepard Boulevard Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Mary Paxton Keeley Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Beulah Ralph Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Eliot Battle Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Derby Ridge Elementary School (PK-05)
    • Mill Creek Elementary School (PK-05)
    • John B. Lange Middle School (06-08)
    • Ann Hawkins Gentry Middle School (06-08)
    • Smithton Middle School (06-08)
    • Oakland Middle School (06-08)
    • Jefferson Middle School (06-08)
    • West Middle School (06-08)
    • Warner Middle School (06-08)
    • David H. Hickman High School (09-12)
    • Muriel Battle High School (09-12)
    • Frederick Douglass High School (09-12) – Alternative School
    • Rock Bridge High School (09-12)
  • Hallsville R-IV School District – Hallsville
    • Hallsville Primary School (PK-01)
    • Hallsville Intermediate School (02-05)
    • Hallsville Middle School (06-08)
    • Hallsville High School (09-12)
  • Harrisburg R-VIII School District – Harrisburg
    • Harrisburg Elementary School (PK-06)
    • Harrisburg Middle School (07-08)
    • Harrisburg High School (09-12)
  • Sturgeon R-V School District – Sturgeon
    • Sturgeon Elementary School (K-04)
    • Sturgeon Middle School (05-08)
    • Sturgeon High School (09-12)

Private schools[edit]

Post secondary[edit]

Public libraries[edit]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

Like nearly all counties nationwide with a major university, the Democratic Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Boone County. Democrats currently hold all of the elected county-wide positions.

Boone County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Tom Schauwecker Democratic
Auditor Julie E. Pitchford Democratic
Circuit Clerk Christy Blakemore Democratic
County Clerk Brianna L. Lennon Democratic
Collector Brian McCollum Democratic
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Daniel Atwill Democratic
Commissioner
(District 1)
Justin Aldred Democratic
Commissioner
(District 2)
Janet Thompson Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney Dan Knight Democratic
Public Administrator Sonja Boone Democratic
Recorder Nora Dietzel Democratic
Sheriff Robert Dwayne Carey Democratic
Treasurer Tom Darrough Democratic

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 44.63% 40,478 52.96% 48,056 2.39% 2,171
2016 41.28% 34,106 54.95% 45,396 3.77% 3,117
2012 37.59% 29,171 58.38% 45,302 4.03% 3,125
2008 42.71% 35,785 55.28% 46,315 2.01% 1,688
2004 47.33% 35,666 51.08% 38,489 1.59% 1,201
2000 43.13% 25,609 52.22% 31,007 4.65% 2,767
1996 30.51% 15,929 65.62% 34,266 3.87% 2,021

Boone County is split between five legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives. Three are held by Republicans, with two held by Democrats.

Missouri House of Representatives — District 44 — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cheri Toalson Reisch 10,470 59.00% +2.99
Democratic Jacque Sample 7,276 41.00% -2.99
Missouri House of Representatives — District 44 — Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cheri Toalson Reisch 8,140 56.01% +0.60
Democratic Maren Bell Jones 6,392 43.99% -0.60
  • District 45 — David Smith (D-Columbia). Consists of the north-central part of the city of Columbia.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 45 Special Election — Boone County (2021)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic David Tyson Smith 1,801 75.10% -24.90
Libertarian Glenn Nielsen 594 24.77% +24.77
Write-ins 3 0.13%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 45 — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Kip Kendrick 11,627 100.00% ±0.00
Missouri House of Representatives — District 46 — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Martha Stevens 16,043 100.00% +33.47
Missouri House of Representatives — District 46 — Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Martha Stevens 11,548 64.91% +2.26
Republican Cathy D. Richards 5,954 33.47% -2.26
  • District 47 — Charles Basye (R-Rocheport). Consists of the western part of the city of Columbia and the communities of Harrisburg and Rocheport.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 47 — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Charles (Chuck) Basye 8,507 53.50% +0.12
Democratic Adrian Plank 7,395 46.50% -0.12
Missouri House of Representatives — District 47 — Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Charles (Chuck) Basye 7,197 53.38% +0.63
Democratic Adrian Plank 6,286 46.62% -0.63
  • District 50 – Sara Walsh Consists of parts of the city of Columbia and the communities of Ashland, Hartsburg, and McBaine.
Missouri House of Representatives - District 50 - Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sara Walsh 11,268 57.63% +2.93
Democratic Kari L. Chesney 8,283 42.37% -2.93
Missouri House of Representatives — District 50 — Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sara Walsh 8,506 54.70% +7.79
Democratic Michela Skelton 7,044 45.30% -7.79

All of Boone County is a part of Missouri's 19th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Caleb Rowden (R-Columbia), who is the Majority Floor Leader. However, Democrats have carried Boone County in recent elections.

Missouri Senate — District 19 — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Judy Baker 45,290 50.66% ±0.00
Republican Caleb Rowden 44,046 49.27% -0.07
Write-ins 63 0.07%
Missouri Senate — District 19 — Boone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Stephen Webber 40,858 50.66% +7.14
Republican Caleb Rowden 39,795 49.34% -7.14

Federal[edit]

All of Boone County is included in Missouri's 4th Congressional District and is currently represented by Vicky Hartzler (R-Harrisonville) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Hartzler was elected to a sixth term in 2020 over Democratic challenger Lindsey Simmons, although Democrats have carried Boone County in recent elections.

United States presidential election results for Boone County, Missouri[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 38,646 42.39% 50,064 54.91% 2,458 2.70%
2016 36,200 43.16% 41,125 49.04% 6,543 7.80%
2012 37,404 47.10% 39,847 50.17% 2,171 2.73%
2008 36,849 43.22% 47,062 55.20% 1,340 1.57%
2004 37,801 49.71% 37,643 49.50% 602 0.79%
2000 28,426 47.69% 28,811 48.33% 2,372 3.98%
1996 22,047 42.46% 24,984 48.12% 4,889 9.42%
1992 19,405 33.52% 26,176 45.22% 12,309 21.26%
1988 22,948 48.35% 24,370 51.35% 140 0.29%
1984 26,600 57.87% 19,364 42.13% 0 0.00%
1980 16,313 42.00% 18,527 47.70% 3,997 10.29%
1976 16,373 46.92% 17,674 50.65% 846 2.42%
1972 17,488 56.13% 13,666 43.87% 0 0.00%
1968 11,917 46.36% 11,771 45.80% 2,015 7.84%
1964 7,695 34.27% 14,758 65.73% 0 0.00%
1960 10,453 47.59% 11,514 52.41% 0 0.00%
1956 8,197 44.07% 10,404 55.93% 0 0.00%
1952 7,545 42.42% 10,206 57.39% 34 0.19%
1948 4,289 29.27% 10,200 69.61% 164 1.12%
1944 4,195 30.12% 9,704 69.67% 30 0.22%
1940 4,869 29.43% 11,615 70.21% 59 0.36%
1936 3,624 24.28% 11,241 75.31% 61 0.41%
1932 3,241 21.64% 11,554 77.13% 184 1.23%
1928 4,876 36.61% 8,422 63.23% 21 0.16%
1924 3,547 28.67% 8,657 69.97% 169 1.37%
1920 4,077 31.63% 8,748 67.87% 65 0.50%
1916 2,180 27.81% 5,601 71.46% 57 0.73%
1912 1,350 18.86% 5,027 70.23% 781 10.91%
1908 2,149 29.63% 5,041 69.49% 64 0.88%
1904 1,857 29.35% 4,375 69.15% 95 1.50%
1900 1,672 25.38% 4,793 72.74% 124 1.88%
1896 1,705 24.99% 5,075 74.39% 42 0.62%
1892 1,495 25.75% 4,054 69.82% 257 4.43%
1888 1,512 26.79% 4,068 72.08% 64 1.13%
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Lindsey Simmons 45,540 51.26% -2.36
Republican Vicky Hartzler 40,809 45.93% +1.78
Libertarian Steven K. Koonse 2,495 2.81% +0.57
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 4th Congressional District — Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Renee Hoagenson 39,830 53.62% +7.64
Republican Vicky Hartzler 32,797 44.15% -5.51
Libertarian Mark Bliss 1,661 2.24% -2.12

Boone County, along with the rest of the state of Missouri, is represented in the U.S. Senate by Josh Hawley (R-Columbia) and Roy Blunt (R-Strafford). However, their Democratic opponents carried Boone County in each of their respective most recent elections.

U.S. Senate – Class I – Boone County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Claire McCaskill 42,315 56.28% -3.13
Republican Josh Hawley 30,710 40.84% +8.23
Libertarian Japheth Campbell 924 1.23% -6.74
Independent Craig O'Dear 833 1.11%
Green Jo Crain 410 0.55% +0.55

Blunt was elected to a second term in 2016 over then-Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

U.S. Senate — Class III — Boone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jason Kander 45,100 54.29% -5.13
Republican Roy Blunt 34,171 41.13% +8.52
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 2,167 2.61% -5.36
Green Johnathan McFarland 919 1.11% +1.11
Constitution Fred Ryman 695 0.84% +0.84
Write-In Write-ins 19 0.02%

Political culture[edit]

At the presidential level, Boone County has been one of the most consistently Democratic counties in Missouri. George W. Bush was the last Republican presidential nominee to carry Boone County in 2004 with a plurality of the vote, no Republican has won a majority in the county in a presidential election since Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Missouri presidential preference primaries[edit]

2020[edit]

The 2020 presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties were held in Missouri on March 10. On the Democratic side, former Vice President Joe Biden (D-Delaware) both won statewide by a wide margin and carried a majority in Boone County. Biden went on to defeat President Donald Trump in the general election.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Biden 15,290 50.49
Democratic Bernie Sanders 13,610 44.94
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 290 0.96
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 610 2.01

Incumbent President Donald Trump (R-Florida) faced a primary challenge from former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, but won both Boone County and statewide by overwhelming margins.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Boone County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 7,818 95.54
Republican Bill Weld 148 1.81
Republican Others/Uncommitted 217 2.65

2016[edit]

The 2016 presidential primaries for both the Republican and Democratic parties were held in Missouri on March 15. Businessman Donald Trump (R-New York) narrowly won the state overall, but Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) carried a plurality of the vote in Boone County. Trump went on to win the nomination and the presidency.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Boone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Ted Cruz 11,235 43.87
Republican Donald Trump 7,913 30.90
Republican John Kasich 3,733 14.58
Republican Marco Rubio 2,110 8.24
Republican Others/Uncommitted 618 2.41

On the Democratic side, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (D-New York) narrowly won statewide, but Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) won Boone County by a wide margin.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Boone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 15,119 60.63
Democratic Hillary Clinton 9,643 38.67
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 175 0.70

2012[edit]

The 2012 Missouri Republican Presidential Primary's results were nonbinding on the state's national convention delegates. Voters in Boone County supported former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum (R-Pennsylvania), who finished first in the state at large, but eventually lost the nomination to former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts). Delegates to the congressional district and state conventions were chosen at a county caucus, which selected a delegation favoring Congressman Ron Paul (R-Texas). Incumbent President Barack Obama easily won the Missouri Democratic Primary and renomination. He defeated Romney in the general election.

2008[edit]

In 2008, the Missouri Republican Presidential Primary was closely contested, with Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) prevailing and eventually winning the nomination. Former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts) won a plurality in Boone County.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Boone County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Mitt Romney 5,688 35.94
Republican John McCain 4,948 31.26
Republican Mike Huckabee 3,838 24.25
Republican Ron Paul 1,047 6.62
Republican Others/Uncommitted 306 1.92

Then-Senator Barack Obama (D-Illinois) received more votes than any candidate from either party in Boone County during the 2008 presidential primary. Despite initial reports that Hillary Clinton (D-New York), also a senator at the time, had won Missouri, Obama narrowly defeated her statewide and later became that year's Democratic nominee, going on to win the presidency.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Boone County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Barack Obama 15,750 60.57
Democratic Hillary Clinton 9,601 36.92
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 652 2.50

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Township boundaries have changed over time. See links at end of article for maps of Boone County showing boundaries of different dates. As a rule, older townships were split, with newer townships created from their subdivisions. This is significant for historical and genealogical research. Note that maps show changes in township boundaries between 1898 and 1930 were minimal.

Public safety[edit]

The BCFPD at a working structure fire.

The Boone County Sheriff has jurisdiction over the whole county. The Boone County Fire Protection District provides fire protection and emergency medical services for a large portion of Boone County, Missouri.[21] The BCFPD is the largest volunteer fire department and third largest fire service organization in the state, protecting 492 square miles (1,270 km2) of residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural property and over 50,000 people.[21] The Boone County Fire District maintains 15 fire stations, a training center, and a headquarters facility.[22]

History[edit]

Prior to 1964, there was no organized fire protection in Boone County. This changed after an elderly handicapped woman died in a house fire just west of the city limits of Columbia. A small group of CB radio enthusiasts, known as the Central Missouri Radio Squad, banded together to develop a fire protection system for Boone County.[23]

USAR Task Force[edit]

Boone County Fire is the sponsoring agency of Urban Search and Rescue Missouri Task Force 1 (MO-TF1) which is one of the 28 FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces across the United States.[24] The team is made up of 210 members that are qualified in various aspects of urban search and rescue.[25]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  2. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp. 211.
  3. ^ The Story of Little Dixie, Missouri, Missouri Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans Archived 2012-07-17 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 3 June 2008
  4. ^ T. J. Stiles, Jesse James: The Last Rebel of the Civil War, New York: Vintage Books, 2003, pp.10-11
  5. ^ PAPERS RELATING TO FOREIGN AFFAIRS, ACCOMPANYING THE ANNUAL MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE SECOND SESSION THIRTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS, PART IV, APPENDIX TO DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE OF 1865; THE ASSASSINATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, LATE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND THE ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF WILLIAM H. SEWARD, SECRETARY OF STATE, AND FREDERICK W. SEWARD, ASSISTANT SECRETARY, ON THE EVENING OF THE 14TH OF APRIL, 1865; EXPRESSIONS OF CONDOLENCE AND SYMPATHY INSPIRED BY THESE EVENTS; Foreign Relations of the United States; Washington DC, 1866, Document 1090
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. ^ Registered Voters in Missouri 2008
  14. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Boone County, Missouri".
  15. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Centralia Public Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  16. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Daniel Boone Regional Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  17. ^ "Southern Boone County Public Library".
  18. ^ "Holts Summit Public Library Now Open".
  19. ^ "Columbia Public Library".
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Fun Facts". Boone County Fire. Archived from the original on May 24, 2015. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  22. ^ "Boone County Fire Protection District" (PDF). Bcfdmo.coma. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 15, 2012. Retrieved November 16, 2012.
  23. ^ "History". Boone County Fire Protection District. Archived from the original on November 7, 2010. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  24. ^ "US&R Task Force Locations". FEMA. Archived from the original on July 5, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2006.
  25. ^ "USAR Task Force". Boone County Fire. Retrieved May 22, 2015.

Further reading[edit]

  • History of Boone County, Missouri: Written and comp. from the most authentic official and private sources; including a history of its townships, towns, and villages. Together with ... biographical sketches and portraits of prominent citizens (1882) online

External links[edit]