Bates County, Missouri

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Bates County
Bates County Courthouse in Butler
Bates County Courthouse in Butler
Map of Missouri highlighting Bates County
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°16′N 94°20′W / 38.26°N 94.34°W / 38.26; -94.34
Country United States
State Missouri
FoundedJanuary 29, 1841[1]
Named forFrederick Bates
SeatButler
Largest cityButler
Area
 • Total851 sq mi (2,200 km2)
 • Land837 sq mi (2,170 km2)
 • Water15 sq mi (40 km2)  1.7%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total16,042
 • Density19/sq mi (7.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitewww.batescounty.net

Bates County is a county located in the west central part of the U.S. state of Missouri, two counties south of the Missouri River and is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area. As of the 2020 census, the population was 16,042.[2] Its county seat is Butler.[3] The county was organized in 1841 and named after Frederick Bates, the second Governor of Missouri.[4]

This mostly rural county has an overwhelmingly ethnic European-American population, which has declined in number since the early 20th century as people have moved to cities.

History[edit]

The borderlands of Kansas and Missouri were battlegrounds for insurgents during the American Civil War, with raids going back and forth across the border. Bates County is noted as the site for the first combat engagement during the war of African-American soldiers serving with the Union and against Confederate forces, which occurred on October 28–29, 1862. The First Kansas Colored Division (part of the state militia) fought Confederate guerrillas at the Battle of Island Mound four miles north of present-day Rich Hill, Missouri, and the Union forces won.

The Kansas soldiers were badly outnumbered but stood their ground, fighting valiantly. The skirmish was covered by The New York Times, which noted the men's bravery at a time when many people questioned whether former slaves could make good soldiers.[5] Their heroic action preceded President Abraham Lincoln's announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in January 1863 and establishment of the United States Colored Troops.

Following a massacre of men and boys and the burning of Lawrence, Kansas, by Confederate bushwhackers in the summer of 1863, the United States General Ewing ordered the evacuation of the civilian population from rural areas of Bates and nearby counties except for within a mile of certain Union-controlled cities, in order to cut off sources of support for Confederate insurgents. This was done under Order No. 11. The county had been a base of Confederate guerrillas. But, Ewing's order generated outrage and added to support of guerrillas in some areas.

This mostly rural county continued to support agriculture in the decades after the Civil War. Since the early 20th century, population has declined as people have moved to cities for work.

Legacy and honors[edit]

  • A statue commemorating the Battle of Island Mound was installed on the north lawn of the county courthouse in Butler, seven miles from the skirmish site.
  • The skirmish area has been preserved since 2012 as the Battle of Island Mound State Historic Site, and its historic prairie is being restored.[6]
  • The Battle of Island Mound (2014) is a short documentary film made in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources; it won two Emmy Awards in 2015 for historic documentary and cinematography.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 851 square miles (2,200 km2), of which 837 square miles (2,170 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (1.7%) is water.[8]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18503,669
18607,21596.6%
187015,960121.2%
188025,38159.0%
189032,22327.0%
190030,141−6.5%
191025,869−14.2%
192023,933−7.5%
193022,068−7.8%
194019,531−11.5%
195017,534−10.2%
196015,905−9.3%
197015,468−2.7%
198015,8732.6%
199015,025−5.3%
200016,65310.8%
201017,0492.4%
202016,042−5.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2020[2]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 16,653 people, 6,511 households, and 4,557 families residing in the county. The population density was 20 people per square mile (8/km2). There were 7,247 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.33% White, 0.61% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Approximately 1.07% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,511 households, out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.80% were married couples living together, 7.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.00% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.50% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 17.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,731, and the median income for a family was $36,470. Males had a median income of $30,298 versus $19,772 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,477. About 11.50% of families and 14.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.30% of those under age 18 and 14.10% of those age 65 or over.

Religion[edit]

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2010), Bates County is regarded as being a part of the Bible Belt, with evangelical Protestantism being the most predominant religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Bates County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (34.21%), United Methodists (15.78%), and Christian Churches and Churches of Christ (14.48%).

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Private schools[edit]

Public libraries[edit]

  • Butler Public Library[14]
  • Rich Hill Memorial Library[15]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

Politics are divided at the local level in Bates County. Republicans hold a majority of the elected positions in the county.

Bates County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Roger Pruden Democratic
Circuit Clerk Shelli White Republican
County Clerk Marlene Wainscott Democratic
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Jim Wheatley Republican
Commissioner
(Northern District)
Ken Mooney Republican
Commissioner
(Southern District)
Trent Nelson Republican
Coroner Greg Mullinax Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Hugh C. Jenkins Democratic
Public Administrator Brenda Doody Democratic
Recorder Danyelle Baker Republican
Sheriff Chad Anderson Republican
Surveyor W.C. “Bill” Lethcho Democratic
Treasurer/Collector Jimmy Platt Democratic

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 76.70% 6,410 21.08% 1,762 2.21% 185
2016 59.64% 4,772 37.36% 2,989 3.00% 240
2012 45.46% 3,513 51.40% 3,972 3.14% 243
2008 41.75% 3,431 55.43% 4,555 2.82% 232
2004 53.22% 4,479 45.09% 3,795 1.69% 142
2000 48.88% 3,783 49.02% 3,794 2.10% 162
1996 34.70% 2,483 63.33% 4,531 1.97% 141
1992 42.06% 3,204 57.94% 4,414 0.00% 0

Bates County is split between three legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives, all of which are held by Republicans.

  • District 56 — Michael Davis (R-Kansas City). Consists of unincorporated areas in the northwestern quadrant of the county south of Drexel.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 56 — Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Davis 244 71.98% -28.02
Democratic Neal Barnes 95 28.02% +28.02
Missouri House of Representatives — District 56 — Bates County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jack Bondon 200 100.00% +25.33
  • District 57 — Rodger Reedy (R-Windsor). Consists of unincorporated areas in the northern part of the county south of Archie and Creighton.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 57 — Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rodger Reedy 438 100.00% +29.83
Missouri House of Representatives — District 57 — Bates County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rodger Reedy 254 70.17% -1.80
Democratic Joan Shores 108 29.83% +1.80
Missouri House of Representatives — District 126 — Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Patricia Pike 5,850 78.42% +6.72
Democratic Jim Hogan 1,610 21.58% -4.87
Missouri House of Representatives — District 126 — Bates County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Patricia Pike 4,332 71.70% -28.30
Democratic Jim Hogan 1,598 26.45% +26.45
Constitution Stephen Biles 112 1.85% +1.85

All of Bates County is a part of Missouri's 31st Senatorial District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Rick Brattin (R-Harrisonville).

Missouri Senate — District 31 — Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rick Brattin 6.323 77.76% +6.74
Democratic Raymond Kinney 1,808 22.24% +22.24
Missouri Senate — District 31 — Bates County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Ed Emery 5,373 71.02% +9.57
Independent Tim Wells 1,459 19.29%
Libertarian Lora Young 733 9.69% +9.69

Federal[edit]

All of Bates County is included in Missouri's 4th Congressional District and is currently represented by Vicky Hartzler (R-Harrisonville) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Hartzler was elected to a sixth term in 2020 over Democratic challenger Lindsey Simmons.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 4th Congressional District — Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler '6,539 78.88% +5.43
Democratic Lindsey Simmons 1,556 18.77% -5.11
Libertarian Steven K. Koonse 195 2.35% -0.32
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 4th Congressional District — Bates County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Vicky Hartzler 4,893 73.45% -0.24
Democratic Renee Hoagenson 1,591 23.88% +1.83
Libertarian Mark Bliss 178 2.67% -1.59

Bates County, along with the rest of the state of Missouri, is represented in the U.S. Senate by Josh Hawley (R-Columbia) and Roy Blunt (R-Strafford).

U.S. Senate – Class I – Bates County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Josh Hawley 4,467 66.82% +23.37
Democratic Claire McCaskill 1,906 28.51% -19.76
Independent Craig O'Dear 183 2.74%
Libertarian Japheth Campbell 89 1.33% -6.95
Green Jo Crain 40 0.60% +0.60

Blunt was elected to a second term in 2016 over then-Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

U.S. Senate — Class III — Bates County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt 4,630 58.06% +14.61
Democratic Jason Kander 2,866 35.94% -12.33
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 259 3.25% -5.02
Green Johnathan McFarland 126 1.58% +1.58
Constitution Fred Ryman 94 1.18% +1.18

Political culture[edit]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 78.2% 6,597 19.8% 1,672 2.0% 169
2016 74.2% 6,001 20.0% 1,618 5.7% 464
2012 64.6% 5,020 32.9% 2,557 2.5% 194
2008 58.4% 4,833 39.5% 3,271 2.2% 179
2004 59.1% 5,004 40.1% 3,398 0.8% 64
2000 54.5% 4,245 43.5% 3,386 2.1% 161
1996 40.7% 2,904 45.2% 3,224 14.1% 1,009
1992 32.3% 2,499 38.7% 2,993 29.0% 2,238
1988 51.6% 3,574 48.1% 3,332 0.4% 24
1984 59.4% 4,223 40.6% 2,889
1980 54.0% 4,061 43.8% 3,297 2.2% 163
1976 43.6% 3,350 55.8% 4,288 0.6% 46
1972 63.8% 5,314 36.2% 3,020
1968 49.5% 4,087 40.8% 3,370 9.7% 801
1964 40.5% 3,514 59.5% 5,162
1960 58.2% 5,429 41.8% 3,906
1956 56.0% 5,467 44.0% 4,300
1952 60.0% 6,002 40.0% 3,995 0.0% 2
1948 48.7% 4,156 51.2% 4,371 0.1% 6
1944 55.5% 5,122 44.4% 4,096 0.2% 18
1940 53.3% 5,727 46.4% 4,978 0.3% 33
1936 46.6% 5,022 52.7% 5,681 0.7% 74
1932 35.0% 3,395 64.2% 6,220 0.8% 79
1928 62.7% 6,133 36.7% 3,594 0.6% 54
1924 47.1% 4,552 48.9% 4,722 4.0% 389
1920 51.9% 5,039 45.7% 4,433 2.4% 236
1916 42.9% 2,597 53.8% 3,255 3.4% 204
1912 23.0% 1,383 50.7% 3,057 26.3% 1,587
1908 44.1% 2,754 52.0% 3,248 4.0% 247
1904 47.1% 2,956 47.3% 2,967 5.6% 352
1900 39.3% 2,731 51.6% 3,591 9.1% 634
1896 32.6% 2,522 65.6% 5,073 1.7% 133
1892 27.7% 1,928 43.1% 3,007 29.2% 2,039
1888 38.1% 2,674 50.6% 3,556 11.3% 794

At the presidential level, Bates County has become solidly Republican in recent years. Bates County strongly favored Donald Trump in both 2016 and 2020. Bill Clinton was the last Democratic presidential nominee to carry Bates County in 1996 with a plurality of the vote, and a Democrat hasn't won majority support from the county's voters in a presidential election since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Like most rural areas throughout Missouri, voters in Bates County generally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles which tend to influence their Republican leanings, at least on the state and national levels. Despite Bates County's longstanding tradition of supporting socially conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes. In 2018, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition A) concerning right to work, the outcome of which ultimately reversed the right to work legislation passed in the state the previous year. 75.43% of Bates County voters cast their ballots to overturn the law.

Missouri presidential preference primaries[edit]

2020[edit]

The 2020 presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties were held in Missouri on March 10. On the Democratic side, former Vice President Joe Biden (D-Delaware) both won statewide and carried Bates County by a wide margin. Biden went on to defeat President Donald Trump in the general election.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Biden 602 63.77
Democratic Bernie Sanders 273 28.92
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 18 1.91
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 51 5.40

Incumbent President Donald Trump (R-Florida) faced a primary challenge from former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, but won both Bates County and statewide by overwhelming margins.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Bates County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 947 97.83
Republican Bill Weld 2 0.21
Republican Others/Uncommitted 19 1.96

2016[edit]

The 2016 presidential primaries for both the Republican and Democratic parties were held in Missouri on March 15. Businessman Donald Trump (R-New York) narrowly won the state overall and carried a plurality of the vote in Bates County. He went on to win the presidency.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Bates County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 1,306 46.04
Republican Ted Cruz 1,080 38.07
Republican John Kasich 199 7.01
Republican Marco Rubio 143 5.04
Republican Others/Uncommitted 109 3.84

On the Democratic side, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (D-New York) narrowly won statewide, but Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) won a majority of the vote in Bates County.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Bates County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 632 53.12
Democratic Hillary Clinton 518 43.53
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 40 3.36

2012[edit]

The 2012 Missouri Republican Presidential Primary's results were nonbinding on the state's national convention delegates. Voters in Bates County supported former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum (R-Pennsylvania), who finished first in the state at large, but eventually lost the nomination to former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts). Delegates to the congressional district and state conventions were chosen at a county caucus, which selected a delegation favoring Santorum. Incumbent President Barack Obama easily won the Missouri Democratic Primary and renomination. He defeated Romney in the general election.

2008[edit]

In 2008, the Missouri Republican Presidential Primary was closely contested, with Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) prevailing and eventually winning the nomination.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Bates County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican John McCain 594 37.71
Republican Mike Huckabee 503 31.94
Republican Mitt Romney 368 23.37
Republican Ron Paul 71 4.51
Republican Others/Uncommitted 39 2.48

Then-Senator Hillary Clinton (D-New York) received more votes than any candidate from either party in Bates County during the 2008 presidential primary. Despite initial reports that Clinton had won Missouri, Barack Obama (D-Illinois), also a Senator at the time, narrowly defeated her statewide and later became that year's Democratic nominee, going on to win the presidency.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Bates County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Hillary Clinton 1,427 63.51
Democratic Barack Obama 676 30.08
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 144 6.41

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Bates County is divided into 24 townships:

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bates County History". Bates County. Archived from the original on December 21, 2017. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2021.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on July 12, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp. 208.
  5. ^ "AFFAIRS IN THE WEST.; A Negro Regiment in Action--The Battle of Island Mounds--Desperate Bravery of the Negros--Defeat of the Guerrillas--An Attempted Fraud", The New York Times, 19 November 1862, accessed 22 February 2016
  6. ^ "Battle of Island Mound State Historic Site". Missouri State Parks. Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  7. ^ " 'The Battle of Island Mound' wins two Emmy Awards from NATAS Mid-American Chapter", 7 October 2015 Press Release, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, accessed 29 February 2016
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Butler Public Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  15. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Rich Hill Memorial Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  17. ^ "Howard Maple Baseball Stats | Baseball Almanac".

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°16′N 94°20′W / 38.26°N 94.34°W / 38.26; -94.34