Chief Secretary to the Treasury

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Chief Secretary to the Treasury
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
David gauke hi.jpg
Incumbent
David Gauke MP

since 14 July 2016
HM Treasury
Style The Right Honourable
Appointer The British Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term length No fixed term
Inaugural holder Henry Brooke
Formation 8 October 1961
Website HM Treasury
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
This article is part of a series on the
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the United Kingdom

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury is the second most senior ministerial position in HM Treasury, after the Chancellor of the Exchequer. It was created in 1961, to share the burden of representing the Treasury with the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Between 1961 and 2015 the holder of the post of Chief Secretary to the Treasury was automatically a member of the Cabinet making the Treasury the only Department to have two ministers automatically serving in the Cabinet.[1][2] Since 2015, however, the status of the Chief Secretary to the Treasury has been reduced to an "also attending Cabinet" role.

The position's responsibilities include negotiating with departments about budget allocations, public sector pay, and procurement policy.

Chief Secretaries to the Treasury[edit]

Colour key (for political parties):
  Conservative   Labour   Liberal Democrats

Name Portrait Term of office Political party P.M. Chancellor
Henry Brooke Henry Brooke MP in 1950.jpg 9 October 1961 13 July 1962 Conservative Macmillan Lloyd
John Boyd-Carpenter No image.svg 13 July 1962 16 October 1964 Conservative Maudling
Home
John Diamond No image.svg 20 October 1964 19 June 1970 Labour Wilson Callaghan
Jenkins
Maurice Macmillan No image.svg 23 June 1970 7 April 1972 Conservative Heath Macleod
Barber
Patrick Jenkin No image.svg 7 April 1972 8 January 1974 Conservative
Thomas Boardman No image.svg 8 January 1974 4 March 1974 Conservative
Joel Barnett No image.svg 7 March 1974 4 May 1979 Labour Wilson Healey
Callaghan
John Biffen No image.svg 5 May 1979 5 January 1981 Conservative Thatcher Howe
Leon Brittan Lord Brittan 2011.jpg 5 January 1981 11 June 1983 Conservative
Peter Rees Peter Rees, Baron Rees.jpg 11 June 1983 2 September 1985 Conservative Lawson
John MacGregor No image.svg 2 September 1985 13 June 1987 Conservative
John Major John Major 1996.jpg 13 June 1987 24 July 1989 Conservative
Norman Lamont Norman Lamont 2013.jpg 24 July 1989 28 November 1990 Conservative Major
David Mellor No image.svg 28 November 1990 10 April 1992 Conservative Major Lamont
Michael Portillo Michael Portillo by Regents College cropped.jpg 10 April 1992 20 July 1994 Conservative
Clarke
Jonathan Aitken No image.svg 20 July 1994 5 July 1995 Conservative
William Waldegrave William Waldegrave visiting University of Salford 1981 cropped.jpg 5 July 1995 2 May 1997 Conservative
Alistair Darling AlistairDarlingABr cropped.jpg 3 May 1997 27 July 1998 Labour Blair Brown
Stephen Byers No image.svg 27 July 1998 23 December 1998 Labour
Alan Milburn Alan Milburn.JPG 23 December 1998 11 October 1999 Labour
Andrew Smith Andrew Smith MP 20050127.jpg 11 October 1999 29 May 2002 Labour
Paul Boateng PBJan2010.JPG 29 May 2002 6 May 2005 Labour
Des Browne Des Browne 070114-D-7203T-010.jpg 6 May 2005 5 May 2006 Labour
Stephen Timms Stephen Timms portrait.jpg 5 May 2006 27 June 2007 Labour
Andy Burnham Andy Burnham2.jpg 28 June 2007 24 January 2008 Labour Brown Darling
Yvette Cooper Yvette Cooper Ministerial portrait.jpg 24 January 2008 5 June 2009 Labour
Liam Byrne Liam Byrne.JPG 5 June 2009 11 May 2010 Labour
David Laws David Laws Minister.jpg 12 May 2010 29 May 2010 Liberal Democrat Cameron (I) Osborne
Danny Alexander Danny alexander hi.jpg 29 May 2010 7 May 2015 Liberal Democrat
Greg Hands Greg Hands MP.jpg 11 May 2015 14 July 2016 Conservative Cameron (II)
David Gauke David gauke hi.jpg 14 July 2016 Incumbent Conservative May Hammond

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ F N Forman; N D J Baldwin (2007), Mastering British Politics (5th ed.), Palgrave Macmillan 
  2. ^ W H Greenleaf (1983), The British Political Tradition: Volume III, Part One, Much Governed Nation, Routledge