Sudanese cuisine

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A woman cooking in Sudan
Location of Sudan

Sudanese cuisine is varied by region, and greatly affected by the cross-cultural influences in Sudan throughout history.

Appetizers[edit]

Meals include Elmaraara and Umfitit, which are made from sheep's offal (including the lungs, liver, and stomach), onions, peanut butter, and salt. They are eaten raw.[1]

Alcoholic beverages[edit]

Sudan is governed under sharia, which bans the purveying, consumption, and purchasing of alcohol. Being lashed 40 times is the penalty for breaking the prohibition on alcohol.[2] Former Sudanese President Gaafar Nimeiry enacted sharia in September 1983, marking the occasion by dumping alcohol into the Nile river.[3] Araqi is an alcoholic gin made from dates, which is illegally brewed in defiance of sharia.[2] Araqi brewers in Sudan continue production despite sharia.[2]

Cheeses[edit]

  • Gibna Bayda (white cheese)[4][5]

Soups and stews[edit]

Several stews, including Mullah, Waika, Bussaara, and Sabaroag use Ni'aimiya (Sudanese spice mix) and dried okra. Miris is a stew made from sheep's fat, onions, and dried okra. Sharmout Abiyad is made from dried meat, while Kajaik is made from dried fish.[1] Stews are regularly eaten with a sorghum porridge called Asseeda or Asseeda Dukun. In Equatoria, Mouloukhiya (a local green vegetable) is added to the Asseeda.[1]

Sudanese soups include Kawari, made from cattle or sheep hooves with vegetables, and Elmussalammiya, made from liver, flour, dates, and spices.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sudanese Food, Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan, Washington, DC
  2. ^ a b c Fleming, Lucy (April 29, 2010). "Sudan's date-gin brewers thrive despite Sharia". BBC News. Retrieved July 7, 2016. 
  3. ^ iPad iPhone Android TIME TV Populist The Page (1984-01-23). "Sudan: Hearts, Minds and Helicopters". TIME. Retrieved 2013-03-15. 
  4. ^ Gibna Bayda (white cheese)
  5. ^ Comparison of Quality of Sudanese White Cheese (Gibna bayda) Manufactured with Solanum dubium Fruit Extract and Rennet

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]