Jinshan District

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the district of Shanghai. For the district of New Taipei City, see Jinshan District, New Taipei.
Fengjing  Ancient Town
Fengjing Ancient Town
Jinshan in Shanghai
Jinshan in Shanghai
Country China
Region Shanghai
Time zone China Standard (UTC+8)
Jinshan District
Traditional Chinese 金山區
Simplified Chinese 金山区
Postal Kinshan
Literal meaning Gold Mountain District

Jinshan District, is a suburban district of southwestern Shanghai, neighboring Zhejiang province and Hangzhou Bay. It has a land area of 586.14 square kilometers (226.31 sq mi) and a population of 732,500 as of the 2010 Chinese census.[1] Jinshan District, located in the southwest of Shanghai, is one of the biggest districts of the city. Local political administration is divided into nine towns and one subdistrict. About 6.2 kilometers (3.9 mi) off the coast of Jinshan, there are three islands named Da Jinshan ("Big Gold Mountain"), Xiao Jinshan ("Little Gold Mountain"), and Fushan ("Floating Mountain"). At 103 meters (338 ft) above sea level, the peak of Dajinshan Island is the highest point within the Shanghai municipality. There are several beaches along the 23.3-kilometer (14.5 mi) shoreline, which are popular tourism destinations.

Elderly Jinshan residents speak a distinct dialect of Shanghainese, with different subdialects around the district. Generally speaking, it is unintelligible to Shanghainese from the central districts, although their dialect can be understood by the Jinshanese. As the city of Shanghai has grown, Jinshan has experienced rapid changes, evolving from a relatively rural area to a more suburban environment. With completion of the high-speed highway in 2008, a new bus line was opened between Shanghai and Jinshan. This Shimei Line (t , s 线) travels between the bus station in Jinshan and another beside the Jinjiang Amusement Park subway station on Line 1 of the Shanghai subway. Travel time is about an hour, depending on traffic and time of day, and costs 10 RMB each way. The Shanghai metro system offers connections to Jinshan. This service, the Jinshan Railway, connects Jinshan New Town to downtown Shanghai in about 30 minutes. It was previously called Metro line 22.[citation needed]

The district is home to the Donglin Temple, a Buddhist temple dedicated to Guanyin, the bodhisattva of compassion.

Jinshan peasant painting, which originated in the town of Fengjing, has become a nationally and internationally exhibited form of folk art.[2]


Jinshan District is home to the headquarters of Shanghai Petrochemical Company Ltd and Jinshan Industrial Park.[3]

Subdistrict and towns[edit]

Name Chinese (S) Hanyu Pinyin Shanghainese Romanization Population (2010)[4]
Shihua Subdistrict 石化街道 Shíhuà Jiēdào zaq hau ka do 87,901
Zhujing Town 朱泾镇 Zhūjīng Zhèn tzyu zyu cin tzen 120,084
Fengjing Town 枫泾镇 Fēngjīng Zhèn fon cin tzen 82,477
Zhangyan Town 张堰镇 Zhāngyàn Zhèn tzan i tzen 37,057
Tinglin Town 亭林镇 Tínglín Zhèn din lin tzen 122,272
Jinshan Industry Zone 金山工业区 Jīnshān Gōngyèqū cin se kon gniq chiu
Lüxiang Town 吕巷镇 Lǚxiàng Zhèn liu raon tzen 52,808
Langxia Town 廊下镇 Lángxià Zhèn laon rau tzen 33,658
Jinshanwei Town 金山卫镇 Jīnshānwèi Zhèn cin se we tzen 70,819
Caojing Town 漕泾镇 Cáojīng Zhèn dzo cin tzen 40,722
Shanyang Town 山阳镇 Shānyáng Zhèn se yan tzen 84,640

Notable residents[edit]



Jinshan is currently served by one suburban line operated by China Railways:


  1. ^ 1.
  2. ^ Huancheng Guo, Guozhu Ren, Mingwei Lü (2007). Countryside of China. Beijing: China Intercontinental Press. ISBN 978-7-5085-1096-5. 
  3. ^ "Contact Info." Shanghai Petrochemical. Retrieved on May 18, 2011. "Address: 48 Jinyi Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai, PRC"
  4. ^ shi, Guo wu yuan ren kou pu cha ban gong; council, Guo jia tong ji ju ren kou he jiu ye tong ji si bian = Tabulation on the 2010 population census of the people's republic of China by township / compiled by Population census office under the state; population, Department of; statistics, employment statistics national bureau of (2012). Zhongguo 2010 nian ren kou pu cha fen xiang, zhen, jie dao zi liao (Di 1 ban. ed.). Beijing Shi: Zhongguo tong ji chu ban she. ISBN 978-7-5037-6660-2. 
  5. ^ "The new cultural revolution: How Little Fatty made it big." The Independent. Thursday November 16, 2006. Retrieved on May 18, 2011.

Further reading[edit]

Coordinates: 30°49′52″N 121°20′38″E / 30.8311°N 121.344°E / 30.8311; 121.344