List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (1–99)

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Texas Farm to Market Road and Ranch to Market Road markers
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate Highway X (IH-X, I-X)
US Routes: U.S. Highway X (US X)
State: State Highway X (SH X)
Loops: Loop X
Spurs: Spur X
Recreational: Recreational Road X (RE X)
Farm or Ranch
to Market Roads:
Farm to Market Road X (FM X)
Ranch-to-Market Road X (RM X)
Park Roads: Park Road X (PR X)
System links

Farm to Market Roads in Texas are owned and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

FM 1[edit]

Farm to Market Road 1
Location: Sabine and San Augustine counties
Length: 18.640 mi[1] (29.998 km)
Existed: 1941[1]–present
Main article: Farm to Market Road 1

Farm to Market Road 1 (FM 1) was the first farm-to-market road to be designated in Texas, at the request of local industry for a paved road. The 18.6-mile (29.9 km) road provides access to rural areas of East Texas from U.S. Highway 96.

FM 2[edit]

Farm to Market Road 2
Location: Grimes County
Length: 6.256 mi[2] (10.068 km)
Existed: July 29, 1941[2]–present

Farm to Market Road 2 is a farm to market road in rural southeastern Grimes County, Texas. FM 2 was designated on July 29, 1941.[2]

FM 2 begins in the village of Courtney, at a county road near the Washington County line. It runs along the northeastern edge of the TDCJ O.L. Luther Prison Unit. It then continues through rural farmland in Grimes County. It then travels east, crossing SH 6 and passing several prison farms before ending at FM 362.[2][3]

FM 2 was designated in 1941 from Courtney east to SH 6. The designation was extended to FM 362 on May 2, 1962, which added approximately 4.4 miles to FM 2.[2]

FM 3[edit]

Farm to Market Road 3
Location: Leon County
Length: 19.273 mi[4] (31.017 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[4]–present

Farm to Market Road 3 is a farm to market road in southwestern Leon County, Texas.[4] FM 3 was designated in March 1942.

The southern terminus of FM 3 is at FM 39 in Normangee. FM 3 passes through the town of Normangee, intersecting with FM Spur 3 as well as other roads. The route briefly travels to the west, through rural farmland, providing access to Normangee City Park.[5] It then turns more northward, passing the unincorporated community of Hilltop Lakes, before intersecting FM 977. FM 3 passes through a long stretch of farmland, before reaching its northern terminus at US 79.[4]

A spur connection connects FM 3 in central Normangee to SH OSR to the south.[4] While signed as Spur 3 using the standard state "Spur" shield, it is not related to the route officially designated Spur 3, located in Nueces County.[6]

FM 3 was originally designated on March 26, 1942, from Normangee westward to Normangee City Park, as a replacement for SH 265. The route was lengthened to the northwest, first on August 25, 1949 to FM 977, and then on August 1, 1970 to its present western terminus at US 79. The spur connection, which is just 0.4 miles long, was designated on November 26, 1969.[4]

FM 4[edit]

Farm to Market Road 4
Location: North Texas
Length: 116.189 mi[7] (186.988 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[7]–present
Main article: Farm to Market Road 4

Farm to Market Road 4 is a Texas state road that runs from Grandview north and west to Jacksboro. FM 4 was designated on March 26, 1942. FM 4 is, as of 2012, one of the longest Farm to Market Roads in the state of Texas.

FM 5[edit]

Farm to Market Road 5
Location: Parker County
Length: 11.068 mi[8] (17.812 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[8]–present

Farm to Market Road 5 is a farm to market road in Parker County, Texas. FM 5 was designated in March 1942.[8]

FM 5 begins at FM 1187 at Aledo. It briefly travels to the south before turning west and entering Annetta South. The route then turns to the north and passes through Annetta and Annetta North. Throughout Annetta South and Annetta, FM 5 is traveling through a highly residential area.[9] FM 5 ends at the eastbound frontage road of IH 20 at its Exit #415 in Willow Park.[8]

FM 5 was originally designated March 26, 1942, from Aledo due north to US 80, replacing Spur 131.[10] On December 10, 1946, it extended south and west to a road intersection at Annetta. On June 28, 1963, it had been extended west and north to Willow Park, replacing FM 1545 and essentially creating a loop route. On December 20, 1984, the original portion of the route was transferred to FM 1187.[8]

FM 6[edit]

Farm to Market Road 6
Location: Collin and Hunt counties
Length: 11.479 mi[11] (18.474 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 6 is located in Collin and Hunt counties. The road is 11.5 miles (18.5 km) long.

The road begins at an intersection with SH 78 just north of Lavon. From there, it goes east, passing through Nevada and Josephine. The eastern terminus is at SH 66 in Caddo Mills.

FM 6 was originally designated on May 26, 1942 as a 4.2-mile road from Caddo Mills to Josephine as a replacement for State Spur 115.[12] On July 19, 1945, it was extended west to 1.3 miles east of Nevada, and another segment was added from Nevada to Lavon. On September 26, 1945, FM 6 was extended from 1.3 miles east of Nevada to Nevada, connecting the 2 sections.

FM 7[edit]

Farm to Market Road 7 was a designation applied to two separate highways. There is currently no highway bearing the FM 7 designation.

1942-1948[edit]

Farm to Market Road 7
Location: Hood county
Existed: March 26, 1942–October 23, 1948

Farm to Market Road 7 was originally designated on May 26, 1942 as a highway from Lipan to US 281 as a replacement for State Spur 108.[13] It extended southeast to Granbury on May 5, 1945.[14] This route was cancelled on October 23, 1948 and became a part of FM 4.[7]

1951-1961[edit]

Farm to Market Road 7
Location: Dallas and Rockwall counties
Existed: June 21, 1951–November 30, 1961

On June 21, 1951, there was a new designation from Garland to Rockwall over a former routing of US 67. It was extended east over the old location of US 67 to Royse City on June 16, 1957. On November 30, 1961, this route was transferred to SH 66.[15]

FM 8[edit]

Farm to Market Road 8
Location: Eastland and Erath counties
Length: 34.816 mi[16] (56.031 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 8 is located in Eastland and Erath counties. The road is 34.8 miles (56.0 km) long.

The route was originally designated on May 26, 1942 from Lingleville east to Stephenville, replacing SH 68, which went northeast to Dallas on US 67 before 1939. On July 19, 1945, the route had been extended westward to the Eastland county line. On December 21, 1945, FM 8 extended further westward, reaching the end of FM 96 in Desdemona. On May 17, 1948, the route had been extended further westward, reaching Gorman, which was the original endpoint of SH 68. FM 96 was cancelled and combined. The highway was extended west on May 26, 1957 and October 26, 1983 over the previous routing of SH 6. The highway was extended east on May 6, 1964 from SH 108 to US 281.

FM 9[edit]

Farm to Market Road 9
Location: Panola and Harrison counties
Length: 24.935 mi[17][nb 1] (40.129 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951–present

Farm to Market Road 9 is a 24.935 mi (40.129 km) farm-to-market road in eastern Texas.[17]

FM 9 begins at an intersection with US 79 in the unincorporated community of Panola.[18] The route travels north into Waskom, where it crosses IH 20; access from IH 20 is provided via Exits #633 (eastbound) and #635 (westbound).[19] The route has a brief concurrency with US 80 before turning back toward the north. FM 9 straddles the east side of the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant before ending near the south shore of Caddo Lake.[17][20] The current FM 9 was designated on May 23, 1951. The original route was the segment from US 79 to FM 451 near Elysian Fields. The route was extended to US 80 in Waskom on November 18, 1953, replacing a section of FM 451,[17] and further north to 4.8 miles north of US 80 on May 5, 1966, and to 1.9 miles south of FM 1999 on June 2, 1967. ON June 11, 1968, it was extended north to FM 1999 and FM 2457, and FM 2457 was combined.[17]

FM 9 (1942)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 9
Location: Midland
Existed: March 26, 1942–August 3, 1943

A previous FM 9 was formed from Midland south 12 miles on March 26, 1942, when the route was designated from part of SH 137. On August 3, 1943, that route was redesignated as part of SH 349. It is unknown if this designation was ever signed. That routing has no connection to the current designation.[17]

FM 10[edit]

Farm to Market Road 10
Location: Panola County
Length: 10.013 mi[21] (16.114 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951–present

Farm to Market Road 10 is located in Panola County. The road is 10.0 miles (16.1 km) long.

The road begins at an intersection with FM 999 in Gary City, Texas. From there, it goes north to Daniels. Just north of Daniels, there is a brief concurrency with FM 2517. After, it continues north towards the northern terminus at U.S. Route 79 Business in Carthage.

FM 10 (March 1942)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 10
Location: Angelina and San Augustine counties
Length: 34 mi[21] (55 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942–September 9, 1947[21]

The route was originally designated on March 26, 1942 as a 34 mile road from San Augustine to Zavalla, via Broaddus in Angelina and San Augustine counties. This route was formed from SH 147. This route was cancelled on September 9, 1947 and redesignated as the current SH 147. The current route was designated on May 23, 1951.[21]

FM 11[edit]

Farm to Market Road 11
Location: Ward, Crane, and Pecos counties
Length: 51.580 mi[22] (83.010 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[22]–present

Farm to Market Road 11 is located in Ward, Crane, and Pecos counties in west Texas. The 51.6-mile (83.0 km) road begins at State Highway 18 in Grandfalls and passes through Imperial and Girvin before terminating at Interstate 10 in Bakersfield.

The road was originally designated in 1942 between Grandfalls and Imperial and has been incrementally lengthened over the years incorporating a former route of FM 847 before the road was completed in 1975. The road crosses U.S. Route 67 and U.S. Route 385 in Girvin.

RM 12[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 12
Location: Hays, Travis counties
Length: 37.931 mi[23] (61.044 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[23]–present

Ranch to Market Road 12 is a 37.9-mile (61.0 km) roadway located in Hays and Travis counties of Texas.[23]

The southern terminus of RM 12 is in San Marcos at Interstate 35 Exit #202. From there, it proceeds along Wonder World Drive along the far west edge of San Marcos. RM 12 continues west from San Marcos to intersect with RM 32 (at "The Junction") and then heads north to Wimberley. RM 12 then continues through Woodcreek to Dripping Springs, where it crosses US 290. From there, it continues north through the community of Fitzhugh to its terminus at RM 3238 (Hamilton Pool Road), approximately six miles west of Bee Cave.

RM 12 was originally formed from the segment of SH 80 from San Marcos to Wimberley on May 26, 1942. On May 31, 1945, it extended north to Dripping Springs. On December 19, 1963, it extended again, from Loop 82 to IH 35. On June 2, 1967, it extended north 5 miles. On May 30, 1987, it extended north to RM 3238 and a county road.[23]

A planned expansion of RM 12 between Dripping Springs and Wimberley to a four- and five-lane divided highway was defeated as part of a county bond election in 2007.[24]

Following the opening of San Marcos' Wonder World Drive extension project, state and local officials re-designated Wonder World Drive, previously designated Farm to Market Road 3407, as part of RM 12, moving the southern terminus to SH 123. The original portion of RM 12 through San Marcos was re-designated as an extension of SH 80 on the state highway system. [25][26]

FM 13[edit]

Farm to Market Road 13
Location: Smith, Cherokee, and Rusk counties
Length: 20.496 mi[27] (32.985 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[27]–present

Farm to Market Road 13 is a 20.5-mile (33.0 km) road, located in Smith, Cherokee. and Rusk counties, that begins at SH 135 in Troup and travels eastward with a major intersection at SH 42 in Price before terminating at Bus. U.S. 79-F and Bus. SH 64 in Henderson. The road also passes through the town of Henry's Chapel. The road was designated in 1942 and previously was a state highway.

FM 13 begins in Troup at SH 135 in Smith County. The road proceeds along E. Duval Street and then turns south along S. Price Street. The road then turns to the southeast along the edge of town before FM 1089 branches off to the west near the Cherokee County line.[28][29] The route continues to the southeast to Henry's Chapel where FM 856 branches to the south. The road then goes to the northeast and enters Rusk County before crossing SH 42 in Price. The road then proceeds eastward toward Henderson and intersects Loop 571 west of town. The road enters Henderson following W. Main St. until it terminates at Bus. US 79-F and Bus. SH 64-E.[29][30]

The road encounters terrain of gentle relief for its entire length.[31][32]

FM 13 was originally designated as State Highway 324 between Henderson and Carlisle in 1939.[33] The town of Carlisle was renamed Price the following year.[34] The highway was re-designated FM 13 in 1942.[27][33] A second, discontinuous segment of the road was designated on June 11, 1945 between Troup and the Cherokee-Rusk county line west of Price, and the uniting segment from that county line to Price was designated on February 20, 1946.[27]

FM 14[edit]

Farm to Market Road 14
Location: Smith and Wood counties
Length: 39.665 mi[35] (63.835 km)
Existed: May 26, 1942[35]–present

Farm to Market Road 14 is a 39.7-mile (63.9 km) road, located in Smith and Wood counties, begins at Loop 323 in Tyler and travels northward with a major intersection at I-20 near Shady Grove before terminating at SH 154 south of Winnsboro. The road also passes through the town of Hawkins. The road was designated in 1942 and previously was a state highway.

FM 14 begins in Tyler at State Loop 323 in Smith County. The road proceeds along State Park Highway through Shady Grove (where it intersects Interstate 20) and Red Springs, where it turns to the northeast. The road then turns to the north, crossing into Wood County and passing through Hawkins, where it intersects with U.S. 80. It continues north through the towns of Pine Mills and Oak Grove to the northern terminus at SH 154.

FM 14 was originally designated as State Highway 270 between Tyler and Sand Flat in 1939.[36] The highway was re-designated FM 14 on May 26, 1942.[35][36] The road was extended to SH 154 on June 11, 1945 and to the current northern terminus on July 14, 1949.[35] On May 31, 1966, the portion from Spur 147 to US 271 became an extension of Spur 147. The road was rerouted east to US 271 on September 27, 1971. On June 27, 1995, the portion from Loop 323 to US 271 became an urban road.[35][37]

FM 15[edit]

Farm to Market Road 15
Location: Smith County
Length: 10.302 mi[38] (16.579 km)
Existed: May 26, 1942[38]–present

Farm to Market Road 15 is a 10.3-mile (16.6 km) road, located in Smith County, begins at SH 135 in Troup and travels eastward to the terminus at SH 64 in Wright City. The road also passes through the town of Salem. The road was designated on May 26, 1942 and previously was a state highway.

FM 15 begins in Troup at State Highway 135. The road proceeds along E. Bryant Street until the city limits of Troup. The road travels five miles to the west before it turns to the north. Near Salem, it turns westward towards the terminus at State Highway 64 in Wright City.

FM 15 was originally designated as State Highway 269 between Troup and Wright City in 1939.[39] The highway was re-designated FM 15 on May 26, 1942.[38][39]

FM 16[edit]

Farm to Market Road 16
Location: Van Zandt and Smith counties
Length: 42.010 mi[40][nb 2] (67.609 km)
Existed: May 26, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 16, or FM 16 is located in Van Zandt and Smith counties. The road is 42 miles (68 km) long.[40]

The road begins at an intersection with SH 64 just west of Colfax, Texas. From there, it goes east through Colfax and Van, intersecting Interstate 20 at an interchange. From Van, the road continues east along SH 110 passing through the towns of Garden Valley, Hideaway, Lindale, Red Springs, and Winona, where it has a brief concurrency with SH 155. From Winona, the road continues east to the eastern terminus at US 271.[40][41]

FM 16 was originally formed on May 26, 1942 from Colfax to Van, replacing a part of SH 243. The road was extended to the current eastern terminus just west of Colfax and eastward to Lindale on June 11, 1945. It was extended to Winona on February 14, 1947, and extended to its current length on October 29, 1948.

FM 17[edit]

Farm to Market Road 17
Location: Van Zandt and Wood counties
Length: 34.590 mi[42] (55.667 km)
Existed: March 26, 1942[42]–present

Farm to Market Road 17 is located in Van Zandt and Wood counties. The road is 34.6 miles (55.7 km) long.[42]

The road begins at an intersection with SH 64 near Canton, Texas. From there, it goes northeast, intersecting Interstate 20 at an interchange. The road continues on to SH 110 in Grand Saline, Texas. The road then follows SH 110 to US 80. The road follows US 80 before heading northeast and north to FM 515. The road follows FM 515 east and then heads north and east to SH 154 in Yantis, Texas.[42]

FM 17 was originally formed on March 26, 1942 from Grand Saline to Alba, replacing a part of SH 110. The road was extended southwest 7 miles on January 11, 1945. On June 11 of that same year, the road was extended to Canton, its current southern terminus. It was extended to Yantis on December 17, 1947. It extended along old US 69 in Alba on October 26, 1954. On October 31, 1957, it extended east 4 miles from Yantis. On October 11, 1961, the section from Yantis east 4 miles was transferred to FM 2225 which became part of FM 2966 in 1980. On October 6, 1980, FM 17 was relocated along FM 515 over Lake Fork Reservoir when the reservoir was impounded.

FM 18[edit]

Farm to Market Road 18
Location: Taylor and Callahan counties
Length: 18.9 mi[43] (30.4 km)
Existed: September 19, 1951[43]–present

Farm to Market Road 18 was designated on September 19, 1951. The road is approximately 18.9 miles long.

The road begins at an intersection with BL I-20 in Baird. It continues west through Clyde to end at SH 36 in Abilene.

The current route was designated on September 19, 1951 from a segment of US 80.[43] On June 27, 1995, the section from SH 36 to Elmdale Community became an urban road.[44]

RM 18[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 18
Location: Mitchell County
Existed: March 26, 1942[43]–April 23, 1947[43]

RM 18 was formed on March 26, 1942 from part of SH 208 from Colorado City, Texas south 6 miles.[43] On April 29, 1942, another section was added from Robert Lee, Texas north 6 miles to the county road to Sanco, Texas.[43] On November 18, 1944, the gap between 6 miles north of Robert Lee and 6 miles south of Colorado City was filled.[43] This route was cancelled on April 23, 1947 when it became an extension of SH 208.[43]

FM 19[edit]

Farm to Market Road 19
Location: Anderson County
Length: 13.362 mi[45] (21.504 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 19 is located in Anderson County. The road is 13.4 miles (21.5 km) long.

The road begins at an intersection with SH 155 in Frankston. From there, it goes south to Neches, via Todd City.[45] The southern terminus is at FM 2574.

FM 19 was designated on April 29, 1942 as a route between Todd City and Neches. It extended north to Frankston on May 19 of that same year. On October 24, 1944, the portion from Todd City to Frankston was canceled. On December 17, 1952, FM 19 extended back from Todd City to Frankston, completing its current route. This route was previously designated as SH 272, which was already cancelled before FM 19 was designated.

FM 20[edit]

Farm to Market Road 20
Location: Bastrop, Caldwell, and Guadalupe counties
Length: 54.213 mi[46] (87.247 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 20 is located in Bastrop, Caldwell, and Guadalupe counties. The road is 54.2 miles (87.2 km) long.

The road begins at an intersection with SH 71 just west of Bastrop, Texas. From there, it goes southwest, passing through Red Rock. At Lockhart, it becomes concurrent with US 183 for a 0.1-mile segment, then turns off to the west on State Park Road. It continues southwest, passing through Fentress, until its southern terminus at SH 123 just north of Seguin.

FM 20 was designated on April 29, 1942 from Bastrop southwestward to Lockhart.[46] On April 20, 1958, It extended southwest to just north of Seguin, replacing FM 964 from Lockhart to FM 621 and a section of FM 621 from FM 621 to just north of Seguin. However, the signs did not change until the 1959 Texas Travel Map was released to the public.[46] Part of what was FM 964 was originally FM 1981.[47]

FM 21[edit]

Farm to Market Road 21
Location: Franklin, Titus, and Camp counties
Length: 15.89 mi[48] (25.57 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[48]–present

Farm to Market Road 21 was designated in 1942, and is, as of 2012, approximately 15.9 miles (25.6 km) long.

FM 21 begins at an intersection with State Highway 11 (SH 11). It then proceeds through a relatively empty, farming area of Camp County.[41] After approximately 3.6 miles (5.8 km), FM 21 crosses Lake Bob Sandlin. The bridge that crosses Lake Bob Sandlin is approximately a half a mile long (0.8 km). After crossing the lake, FM 21 passes Lake Bob Sandlin State Park.[49] The road then passes through the unincorporated community of Blodgett. After this, FM 21 passes through a long stretch of open farmland before passing through Hopewell and continues to its northern terminus of SH 37.[41]

FM 21 was first designated on April 29, 1942, as a 5.5-mile (8.9 km) road traveling from SH 11 to around Lake Bob Sandlin State Park. Later that day, another segment from created from SH 37 through Hopewell to Macon, creating a gap in the route. The gap was filled on June 11, 1945.[48]


FM 22[edit]

Farm to Market Road 22
Location: Cherokee County
Length: 9.070 mi[50] (14.597 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[50]–present

Farm to Market Road 22 is a 9.070 mi (14.597 km) farm to market road in north-central Cherokee County, Texas.[50]

The western terminus of FM 22 is at an intersection with US 69 in Craft. The route travels east through Turney and Gallatin, where it has a brief concurrency with FM 768.[51] FM 22 continues eastward and ends at an intersection with SH 110 south of the community of Ponta.[50][52]

FM 22 has no local street names. Mostly rural for all of its length, FM 22 passes by a landscape of rolling hills of trees and farmland. The route is a two-lane road without shoulders for its entire length.

FM 22 was originally commissioned on April 29, 1942; its length was identical to that of its present-day routing. On May 7, 1970, a section west of US 69 at Craft, connecting to FM 347 south of Jacksonville, was added, increasing the length by 1.2 miles (1.9 km). This addition was removed from the state highway system On March 1, 1972, and FM 22 returned to its previous length.[50][51] The actual dates of construction of the route are unclear.

FM 23[edit]

Farm to Market Road 23
Location: Cherokee County
Length: 14.56 mi[53] (23.43 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[53]–present

Farm to Market Road 23 is a farm to market road in Cherokee County. FM 23 was designated in April 1942.

FM 23 begins at an intersection with SH 294. FM 23 then travels through a very empty agricultural area of Cherokee County, intersecting with several other farm roads and a few county roads. FM 23 passes Russel Cemetery, outside of Rusk. It then reaches its northern terminus with FM 343, on the outskirts of Rusk.[54]

FM 23 was designated by TxDOT on April 29, 1942. It has not been extended or rerouted yet.[53]

FM 24[edit]

Farm to Market Road 24
Location: Nueces County
Length: 5.056 mi[55] (8.137 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[55]–present

Farm to Market Road 24 is a farm to market road in Nueces County and passes residential and commercial areas in the communities of Violet, Annaville and Corpus Christi. FM 24 is locally known as Violet Road. The highway was first designated in April 1942.[55]

FM 24 begins at its southern terminus with State Highway 44 (SH 44) in Violet. The highway then passes several farms before entering a residential area of Corpus Christi.[41][56] It passes several neighborhoods churches,[57] and the small Violet Park, before intersecting with Spur 407. The highway runs through a few neighborhoods, and some restaurants, before reaching the northern terminus at exit 11B on Interstate 37 (I-37). The highway is known as Violet Road throughout its course.[56][58] The highway was used by 1,300 vehicles on average each day near Violet; near the I-37 interchange the traffic count was 13,400 vehicles daily.[59] No section of FM 24 has been listed on the National Highway System,[60] a network of roadways important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[61] The highway was designated on April 29, 1942 as a route from Coleman west to the New Central School. It was originally 9.5 miles (15.3 km) in length. The entire route was then cancelled on June 22, 1944, and redesignated as Farm to Market Road 53.[55] The route was then redesignated back to its original name of FM 24 on May 23, 1951, but was only signed from SH 44 to Spur 407(then SH 9). The highway was then extended to its current northern terminus, Interstate 37, on September 5, 1973.[55]

FM 25[edit]

Farm to Market Road 25
Location: Comal and Guadalupe counties
Length: 9.9 mi[62] (15.9 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–September 28, 1988

Farm to Market Road 25 began at I-35 in New Braunfels and extended southeast for 9.9 miles (15.9 km) to I-10 near Seguin.

FM 25 was formed on April 29, 1942 from US 81 (now Business I-35) to US 90. On June 9, 1966, the section from US 90 to I-10 was cancelled. On February 26, 1968, the section from US 81 to I-35 was transferred to SH 46 and Loop 337. The remainder of FM 25 was transferred to SH 46 on September 28, 1988.[62]

FM 26[edit]

Farm to Market Road 26
Location: Dawson and Martin counties
Length: 23.247 mi[63] (37.412 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[63]–present

Farm to Market Road 26 is located in both Dawson and Martin counties. FM 26 was designated in April 1942.

FM 26 begins at a junction with FM 846. From there, FM 26 heads northwest for a few miles before turning and heading in a westerly direction. From there, FM 26 turns northwest yet again, and merges with FM 3263. FM 26 intersects with a few other farm roads and county roads, before reaching its northern terminus at US Highway 87 (US 87). FM 26 does not pass a single community during its entire length.[41]

FM 26 was designated on April 29, 1942 as a rote from US 87 south of Lamesa to Sparenberg. It was originally just 5.3 miles (8.5 km), located entirely in Dawson County. FM 26 was extended south 4 miles on November 20, 1951. FM 26 was extended to FM 846 on March 26, 1953, adding another 13.9 miles (22.4 km) onto FM 26, of which 11.8 miles (19.0 km) were from the recently cancelled FM 1742.[63]

FM 27[edit]

Farm to Market Road 27
Location: Freestone and Limestone counties
Length: 27.247 mi[64] (43.850 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[64]–present

Farm to Market Road 27 (FM 27) is a Farm to Market Road in the US state of Texas. The highway is located in Freestone and Limestone counties. FM 27 was designated on April 29, 1942.

FM 27 begins at its western terminus with State Highway 171 (SH 171). From there, FM 27 proceeds through low-lying, rolling grassy fields, and passes several farms. The highway intersects several times with other Farm Roads and county roads. Entering the town of Wortham, FM 27 passes Wortham High School before passing shortly through downtown. The roadway then proceeds through hilly, treed, grasslands, again intersecting the occasional county road, before running concurrently with FM 80 just south of Kirvin. FM 27 then continues through forested area before entering Fairfield, and reaching its eastern terminus, US Highway 84 (US 84).[41]

Designated on April 29, 1942, FM 27 initially stretched from Fairfield to Wortham, approximately 18.5 miles (29.8 km). On February 15, 1950, the highway was extended from Wortham to the Limestone County line, adding approximately 1.6 miles (2.6 km) to the route, totaling 20.1 miles (32.3 km), replacing FM 1450. FM 27 was again extended on September 27, 1960, adding 7.4 miles (11.9 km) to the route, and bringing FM 27 to its modern day western terminus, SH 171.[64]

FM 28[edit]

Farm to Market Road 28
Location: Floyd and Crosby counties
Length: 29.675 mi[65] (47.757 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[65]–present

Farm to Market Road 28 (FM 28) is located in Crosby and Floyd counties. The highway was designated on June 23, 1942.

FM 28 begins at its southern terminus, its intersection with US Highway 82/State Highway  114 (US 82/SH 114). From there, FM 28 heads in a northerly direction, passing empty, rolling grassy fields, and the occasional house or farm. The highway continues in a northern direction for nearly 10 miles (16 km), when it turns and heads directly eastward. After heading east for approximately two miles (3.2 km), FM 28 again turns and heads north. The road continues heading north, in conditions almost the same as before, when it turns northwesterly and passes through the unincorporated community of Dougherty. FM 28 then again turns north, and travels for about two miles (3.2 km), before reaching its intersection with US 62/US 70. FM 28 runs concurrently with these other highways for about one mile (1.6 km), before again heading north, reaching its northern terminus, with County Roads 200 and 303 (CR 200, CR 303).[41]

On June 23, 1942, FM 28 was designated to a route in Floyd County, stretching from US 70 to Dougherty. On July 21, 1949, FM 28 was extended to the Crosby County line, adding approximately 8.2 miles (13.2 km) to the previous route. On October 26, 1954, FM 28 was extended again south to its modern southern terminus, US 82, and FM 1472, which ended 8.7 miles north of there, was cancelled. On April 1, 1958, FM 28 was extended 5.3 miles (8.5 km) northward, because FM 2265 was cancelled. The two highways were combined, and FM 28 reached its modern-day northern terminus, with CR 200/CR 303.[65]


FM 28 (April 1942)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 28
Location: Franklin County
Length: 8.5 mi[65] (13.7 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–April 29, 1942[65]

FM 28 was originally designated on April 29, 1942, in Franklin County, from a junction with SH 37, just south of Mt. Vernon, to the settlement of Macon, approximately 8.5 miles (13.7 km). Later that day, FM 28 was cancelled and added to FM 21.[65]

FM 29[edit]

Farm to Market Road 29 was a designation applied to two separate highways. There is currently no highway bearing the FM 29 designation.

1942–1949[edit]

Farm to Market Road 29
Location: Grimes County
Length: 11.0 mi[66] (17.7 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–January 27, 1949[66]

FM 29 was initially designated along a road in Grimes County from SH 90 near Singleton to Iola. The road was 11.0 miles (17.7 km) long. On January 27, 1949, the designation was cancelled, with the road becoming an extension of FM 39.[66]

1951–1967[edit]

Farm to Market Road 29
Location: Val Verde County
Length: 1.9 mi[66] (3.1 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951–November 1, 1967[66]

The FM 29 designation was later applied to a road in Val Verde County, beginning at US 90 northwest of Devils River and heading northeast to Lake Walk. Initially, the road was 2.12 miles (3.41 km) long; by 1965, the highway had been truncated to 1.9 miles (3.1 km). FM 29 was cancelled on November 1, 1967, because the roadway was planned to become inundated by Amistad Reservoir.[66]

FM 30[edit]

Farm to Market Road 30
Location: Uvalde County
Length: 3.622 mi[67] (5.829 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951–present

Farm to Market Road 30 lies in Uvalde County. The road begins at SH 127 three miles (4.8 km) northwest of Sabinal, and proceeds northward to end at a county road.

FM 30 (1942–1948)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 30
Location: Childress County
Length: 24 mi[67] (39 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–January 7, 1948[67]

The original Farm to Market Road 30, designated on April 29, 1942, initially ran from Memphis east to a connection with US 83 in Childress County. This iteration of the FM 30 designation was cancelled on January 7, 1948 as the road became part of SH 256.[67]

FM 31[edit]

Farm to Market Road 31
Location: Harrison and Panola counties
Length: 43.335 mi[68] (69.741 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[68]–present

Farm to Market Road 31 lies in Harrison County and Panola County. The highway begins at US 59 (Future I-369) in Marshall, turning southeast while intersecting I-20 outside the city limits. In the community of Crossroads, FM 2625 passes through while FM 2199 ends completely, all while FM 31 continues southeastward. In the town of Elysian Fields, FM 451 ends as FM 31 heads into Panola County. The highway intersects US 79 in De Berry. The road has a small concurrency with FM 123 in Carthage. Further south, FM 2517 makes a four-way intersection there, where a few miles to the east FM 3359 is formed. The highway ends at the Texas-Louisiana state line, where it becomes LA 765. FM 31 was originally designated on April 29, 1942 from US 59 in Marshall to Elysian Fields. On June 11, 1945, it extended southward to the Panola County Line. 7 days later, it extended south to De Berry. On November 20, 1951, it extended south to FM 998(now FM 123). On January 7, 1952, FM 31 extended southward to the Louisiana State Line, replacing a section of FM 123.

RM 32[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 32
Location: Blanco, Comal, and Hays counties
Length: 23.23 mi[69] (37.39 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[69]–present

Ranch to Market Road 32 lies in Blanco County, Comal County, and Hays County. The road begins at US 281 south of Blanco, and continues east as it enters Comal County. In Fischer, FM 3424 ends there, and upon entering Hays County, the highway ends at an intersection with RM 12 in Wimberley.

RM 32 was originally designated as State Highway 232 between Wimberley and US 281 in 1939. On April 29, 1942, RM 32 was designated on its current route, replacing SH 232.[70]

RM 33[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 33
Location: Howard, Glasscock, and Reagan counties
Length: 57.48 mi[71] (92.51 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[72]–present

Ranch to Market Road 33 was designated on April 29, 1942 from US 87 south 6.4 miles to the Glasscock County Line. On February 11, 1944, it extended south to Garden City. On June 11, 1945, it extended south to Big Lake. On October 29, 1948, it extended south to SH 163. On July 14, 1949, RM 33 extended south and east to Eldorado, replacing FM 865 from 8 miles west of Eldorado to Eldorado. On June 30, 1977, the section from Eldorado west 50.6 miles to what was then RM 1980 was transferred to US 190. On May 16, 1984, the section of RM 33 from SH 137 to US 190 was transferred to SH 137.

FM 34[edit]

Farm to Market Road 34
Location: Hudspeth County
Length: 2.612 mi[73] (4.204 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[73]–present

Farm to Market Road 34 is located entirely in Hudspeth County.

The southern terminus of FM 34 is in unincorporated Hudspeth County at FM 192. From here, the road proceeds northward for 2.6 miles before ending at exit 87 on I-10, approximately 15 miles east of Fort Hancock[73][74][75]

On April 29, 1942, FM 34 was assigned to a route from a junction with US 80 (present-day I-10) southward approximately 3.0 miles.[73]

FM 35[edit]

Farm to Market Road 35
Location: Rockwall, Hunt, and Rains counties
Length: 7.304 mi[76] (11.755 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[76]–present

Farm to Market Road 35 lies in Rockwall County and Hunt County. The road begins at I-30 in Royse City, and spends only a few miles in Rockwall County, before entering Hunt County. The road makes an intersection with FM 1565 before it becomes concurrent with TX 276, while further east, the concurrent highway becomes a three-way concurrency with the addition of TX 34 in Quinlan. The highway, still concurrent, composes a bridge between Lake Tawakoni where it enters Rains County. It is in Point where the concurrency begins, ironically located where FM 2737 is located. FM 35 was designated ON April 29, 1942 from SH 34 in Quinlan east 4.2 miles to Mexico. On November 23, 1948, it extended west 7 miles to Union Valley. Oo November 30, 1949, it extended east 4 miles to the Sabine River Bottom. On December 17, 1952, it extended west to the Rockwall County Line. Two months later, on February 26, 1953, it extended west to US 67, replacing FM 1396 from the Rockwall County Line to US 67. On October 26, 1954, it extended east to US 69 (now FM 2795), replacing FM 2102 from 5.8 miles west of US 69 to US 69.

FM 36[edit]

Farm to Market Road 36
Location: Hunt County
Length: 29.725 mi[77] (47.838 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[77]–present

Farm to Market Road 36 is entirely within Hunt County. The road begins at a concurrent FM 35/TX 276 and ends at a concurrent I-30 and US 67. FM 36 was originally designated on April 29, 1942 from SH 24 (now US 380) west of Floyd to Merit. On September 12, 1946, it extended south to US 67 (now SH 66) in Caddo Mills. On November 30, 1949, it extended south 4 miles to what is now I-30. On October 28, 1953, it extended north to FM 1562. On October 26, 1954, it extended south to FM 35/TX 276. On June 24, 2010, the section of FM 36 from US 380 to BU 380-J was removed from the state highway system. FM 36 was instead realigned over the new US 380.

FM 37[edit]

Farm to Market Road 37
Location: Bailey, Lamb, Hale, and Floyd counties
Length: 84.621 mi[78] (136.184 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[78]–present

Farm to Market Road 37 lies in Bailey County, Lamb County, Hale County, and Floyd County. in the state of Texas. The road begins at TX 214 south of Enochs, and heads eastward to FM 54. Later, on a different end of FM 54, it meets the Bailey County line, and heads northeast to Amherst with FM 1072. At another point with FM 1072, it heads eastward to FM 168 at Farm Camp. It then crosses US 87 in Cotton Center, and performs an analogous operation (being concurrent to a highway and then ending the concurrency) on its way to FM 400, and from there to FM 789, and from there to FM 378, and finally eastward to US 62 in Floydada, where the highway ends.[79] When the highway was created, it ran from a junction with US 84 to Amherst. On March 18, 1944, the highway was expanded to include a strip from Amherst to SH 51. On December 16, 1948, it extended east 5.8 miles to what is now FM 1072. In 1968, the highway was expanded to its present length, replacing FM 2189 from SH 214 to FM 54, Farm to Market Road 1928 from FM 54 to US 84, a section of FM 1072 from FM 1072 to FM 168, FM 1315 from FM 168 to FM 400, and FM 579 from FM 400 to US 62. Part of the road numbered FM 1315 was previously designated as FM 2063.

FM 38[edit]

Farm to Market Road 38
Location: Lamar and Delta counties
Length: 33.301 mi[80] (53.593 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[80]–present

Farm to Market Road 38 lies in Lamar and Delta counties. The road begins at US 82 west of Petty and turns north and east to Maxey, then southeast through Brookston and Roxton to Ben Franklin.

FM 38 was originally designated on April 29, 1942 from US 82 west of Brookston through Roxton to Noble as a replacement for State Highway 88. On April 30, 1945, the Roxton-Noble section was cancelled and became part of FM 137. FM 38 was expanded to include a section from the Lamar County line to FM 128 at Ben Franklin on June 9, 1947, creating a gap in the highway. This gap was closed on February 27, 1948, when FM 38 was extended from Roxton to Ben Franklin. On August 23, 1948, FM 38 was again extended west over the old location of US 82 to the new location of US 82. On February 1, 1949 the road was extended northwest to Maxey, replacing FM 907. The final change came on August 25, 1949 when FM 38 was extended to US 82 west of Petty, bringing the highway to its final length.

FM 39[edit]

Farm to Market Road 39
Location: Limestone, Leon, Madison, and Grimes counties
Length: 82.927 mi[81] (133.458 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[81]–present

Farm to Market Road 39 lies in Limestone County, Leon County, Madison County, and Grimes County. The road begins at TX 14 south of Mexia, and turns south, intersecting TX 164 before FM 80 ends directly parallel to the Freestone County line. However, no part of the road's mileage is in Freestone County, as the road turns south to Leon County shortly afterward. The highway then intersects with US 79 in Jewett and then intersects with TX 7 in the community of Concord. As the highway turns directly south, it makes an intersection with FM 977 in Flynn. In Normangee, it makes an intersection with the Old San Antonio Road, where it enters Madison County, and has a concurrency with FM 1452 in the community of George. The highway subsequently makes an intersection with a concurrent TX 21/US 190 in North Zulch. As it enters Grimes County, the road bypasses Iola, and ends at TX 90 north of Singleton. Originally, the road only included the section from Normangee to Flynn. On August 3, 1943, the road expanded to include a segment from Mexia to Personville, creating a gap in the highway. The road's southern portion was expanded on February 28, 1945 to include US 190 at North Zulch. Meanwhile, the northern strip received a segment from Personville to Jewett, and the southern gap expanded again on April 18, 1947 to Robbins. It extended from Jewett to Robbins on January 27, 1949, closing the gap. That same day, FM 39 extended south to SH 90 in Singleton, replacing FM 29 from Iola to Singleton. On June 21, 1982, the highway was slightly modified, giving it its present-day length.

FM 40[edit]

Farm to Market Road 40
Location: Lubbock and Crosby counties
Length: 32.515 mi[82] (52.328 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[82]–present


FM 41[edit]

Farm to Market Road 41
Location: Hockley and Lubbock counties
Length: 48.321 mi[83] (77.765 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[83]–present

Farm to Market Road 41 lies within Hockley County and Lubbock County. The road begins from FM 303 southeast of Sundown and turns about 48 miles eastward bypassing Ropesville and Slide before eventually returning to US 84 in Slaton. Originally, the route went from a junction of US 87 south of Lubbock to Slide. On June 25, 1945, a section from 5 miles west of Slaton was added, as well as a section from Slide to the Hockley County line, were added to the highway. On December 17, 1952, FM 41 extended west to FM 300(now FM 303), replacing FM 1174 from FM 300 to SH 51(now US 385). On October 28, 1953, 4.8 more miles east to US 84 were added, and the highway reached its present length.

RM 42[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 42
Location: Menard and McCulloch counties
Length: 9.2 mi[84] (14.8 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942–June 30, 1977[84]

RM 42 was originally formed on April 29, 1942 from Brady southwest to a point 1 mile north of Calf Creek as FM 42. On January 18, 1946, the road was shortened to end at Davis School for unknown reasons. On November 23, 1948, FM 42 was extended west to US 87. On July 21, 1949, the road was extended north to US 83, replacing FM 379. On October 1, 1956, FM 42 was changed to RM 42. The highway was cancelled on June 30, 1977 when it was redesignated as US 190.

FM 43[edit]

Farm to Market Road 43
Location: Nueces County
Length: 10.791 mi[85] (17.366 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951–present

Farm to Market Road 43 lies within Nueces County. The highway runs from SH 357 southwest and west to FM 665.

FM 43 was formed on May 23, 1951 from SH 286 through London School to FM 665. On July 1, 1965 the road was extended east and northeast to SH 357. On September 1, 1968, FM 43 was extended northeast to SH 358. On June 30, 1995, the section from SH 358 to SH 357 was redesignated as an urban road.

FM 43 (1942)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 43
Location: Menard and Schleicher counties
Existed: April 29, 1942–March 17, 1948

The original FM 43 was formed on April 29, 1942 from US 83 near Menard through Mission San Saba to an existing roadway north of the San Saba River as a replacement of a portion of State Highway 151. On June 11, 1945 the road was extended east to the Menard County line. On June 20, 1945 FM 43 was extended west to the Schleicher County line and changed to RM 43. The highway was cancelled on March 17, 1948 and reassigned back to SH 151 (now SH 29).

FM 44[edit]

Farm to Market Road 44
Location: Red River and Bowie counties
Length: 36.789 mi[86] (59.206 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[86]–present


FM 45[edit]

Farm to Market Road 45
Location: Brown, Mills, and San Saba counties
Length: 30.705 mi[87] (49.415 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[87]–present

Farm to Market Road 45 runs from US 190 in Richland Springs north to US 377 about 5 miles south of Brownwood. FM 45 forms a portion of the partial beltway that goes around the southeast side of Brownwood (the rest is formed by FM 2126).

FM 45 starts at US 190 about 14.7 miles west of San Saba and heads northbound through Richland Springs to Main Ave. where the road briefly turns east for one block before continuing northbound. After exiting Richland Springs, FM 45 traverses the rural landscape with a daytime speed limit of 70 MPH. Halfway to Brownwood, FM 45 crosses the Colorado River from San Saba County into Brown County. At its junction with FM 2126, FM 45 continues west to US 377 with a speed limit of 65 MPH.

FM 45 provides Brownwood with a direct link to Richland Springs and San Saba (and vice versa). The highway shortens the trip between Brownwood and Richland Springs from 54 miles (going through Brady) to 34 miles.

Before Farm to Market Roads were built, one of the first bridges across the Colorado River in this area is the Regency Bridge. A historical marker was erected by TxDOT at the junction of FM 45 and FM 574 that talks about the bridge.

FM 45 was originally designated on April 29, 1942 from US 190 north 7 miles to the Locker Road. On July 13, 1945, it extended north 2.3 miles. On November 23, 1948, it extended north 2.4 miles to near the Colorado River. On January 22, 1953, FM 45 extended north and west to US 377, replacing FM 1474 from the Mills-Brown County Line to US 377. On October 29, 1954, it was extended south from the old location of US 190 to the new location of US 190.

FM 46[edit]

Farm to Market Road 46
Location: Falls and Robertson counties
Length: 34.035 mi[88] (54.774 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[88]–present


FM 47[edit]

Farm to Market Road 47
Location: Rains and Van Zandt counties
Length: 40.582 mi[89] (65.310 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[89]–present


FM 48[edit]

Farm to Market Road 48
Location: Hemphill and Wheeler counties
Length: 8.708 mi[90] (14.014 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[90]–present


FM 49[edit]

Farm to Market Road 49
Location: Wood and Upshur counties
Length: 33.674 mi[91] (54.193 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[91]–present


FM 50[edit]

Farm to Market Road 50
Location: Central Texas
Length: 51.378 mi[92] (82.685 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[92]–present

Farm to Market Road 50 is a 52.9-mile (85.1 km) route, beginning at State Highway 105 near Brenham and passing to the north through Independence to U.S. Route 79 and U.S. Route 190 near Hearne. The road has a brief concurrency with SH 21 along a bridge crossing the Brazos River. The road is in Washington, Burleson, Brazos, and Robertson counties.

The road was originally designated on April 29, 1942 along the portion of the present route north of SH 21. On May 20, 1942, the road was extended through Snook to SH 36 at Lyons, replacing a portion of SH 230. On August 24, 1943, FM 50 was extended south to the end of SH 211 in Independence. On October 6, 1943, FM 50 was extended south to SH 90, replacing SH 211. The section of FM 50 from east of Snook to SH 36 was transferred to FM 60.

FM 51[edit]

Farm to Market Road 51
Location: North Texas
Length: 114.986 mi[93] (185.052 km)
Existed: April 29, 1942[93]–present

Farm to Market Road 51 runs from US 67 in Somervell County north and east to I-35 in Gainesville. Skirting the northwestern fringes of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, it is available as a more scenic and less-congested shortcut between I-20 west of Weatherford and I-35 north of Gainesville.

This route north of Weatherford was designated as SH 89 until 1939. FM 51 was designated on April 29, 1942 from Gainesville to Era. On May 19 of that same year, three more sections were added: one from Decatur northeast 4.8 miles to the Slidell Road, one from SH 114 to Springtown, and one from Weatherford north 4 miles. On August 22, 1944, it extended from 4 miles north of Weatherford to Springtown and from 4.8 miles northeast of Decatur to the Denton/Wise county line, closing one gap and partially closing another. On June 5, 1945, another section was added from the Parker-Hood county line to Granbury. 7 days later, FM 51 extended from Weatherford to the Parker-Hood county line, connecting the sections. On February 14, 1947, it extended from SH 114 to Decatur, closing another gap. On April 28, 1949, it extended from the Denton/Wise county line to Era, closing the last gap. On September 28 in that same year, it extended east from the old location of US 77 to the new location of US 77. On February 6, 1953, it extended southwest to a road intersection 4.7 miles southwest of Granbury, replacing FM 1657 on that route. On August 24, 1955, it extended southwest to FM 201 (now FM 56). On November 23, 1959, it extended east from US 77 along the old location of US 82 to US 82. On December 20, 1984, it extended southwest to US 67, replacing FM 204.[94] In that same order, FM 56 replaced FM 201. Part of the road designated FM 204 was designated as FM 2223.

FM 52[edit]

Farm to Market Road 52
Location: Parker and Palo Pinto counties
Length: 14.404 mi[95] (23.181 km)
Existed: May 20, 1942[95]–present


FM 53[edit]

Farm to Market Road 53
Location: West Texas
Length: 69 mi[96] (111 km)
Existed: May 20, 1942–August 8, 1988[96]

Farm to Market Road 53 was designated on May 20, 1942 from SH 70 13 miles south of Sweetwater, southeast to SH 158(now US 277). On June 20, 1944, it extended southeast to Crews, replacing FM 70 from Wingate to Crews. Another section was added from Coleman to the New Central school, replacing FM 24. This created a gap in the route. On January 15, 1949, the western section extended east to the Coleman County Line and the eastern section extended west to 1.8 miles northwest of Glen Cove. On July 25, 1950, it extended from the Coleman County Line to 1.8 miles northwest of Glen Cove, closing the gap. On September 21, 1965, it was relocated in Winters, removing a concurrency with US 83. On December 1, 1969, it extended east over the old location of US 84 to the new location of US 84. On May 16, 1988, it was redesignated as SH 153.[96]

FM 54[edit]

Farm to Market Road 54
Location: Bailey, Lamb, Hale, and Floyd counties
Length: 101.164 mi[97] (162.808 km)
Existed: May 20, 1942[97]–present

Farm to Market Road 54 lies in Bailey County, Lamb County, Hale County, and Floyd County. The road begins at the Texas-New Mexico state line where NM 321 ends, and continues east to Enochs whilst making an intersection with FM 214. The highway turns north and for a short stretch is merged with FM 37. After leaving Bula and entering the Lamb County line, the highway makes an intersection with US 84 in Littlefield. While the highway is still in the city limits, it also makes intersections with US 385 and Boulevard 430. After exiting the city limits, the highway makes an intersection with FM 1072, and performs this same action again when it intersects FM 168 in Spade. Soon after it passes the Hale County line, FM 179 becomes conterminous with FM 54, but exits the highway shortly afterward. The highway then crosses I-27 and US 87, which are both conterminous. The highway then intersects FM 400 and turns northeast in Petersburg due to FM 789 slanting there shortly before entering Floyd County. Shortly thereafter, the highway ends at a conterminous stretch of TX 207 and US 62 south of Floydada.

FM 54 was formed on May 20, 1942 on a junction with US 87 north of Abernathy to Petersburg. On May 18, 1944, the highway expanded to include a section from Spade via Littlefield to the Bailey county line. This created a gap. On June 4, 1945, another section was added from SH 207 to the Floyd-Hale county line. This created another gap. Nearly two weeks later, one section extended west from the Lamb-Bailey county line to SH 214. On July 9 of that same year, one section extended west from US 87 to the Hale-Lamb county line. On June 4, 1946, it extended from the Floyd-Hale county line to Petersburg, closing one gap. On January 22, 1947 a spur connection was added in Petersburg that year. On November 18, 1947, it extended from the Hale-Lamb county line to Spade, closing the last gap. On December 16, 1948, it extended west 8 miles from SH 214. On July 14, 1949, it extended west to the New Mexico State Line, completing its current route.

FM 55[edit]

Farm to Market Road 55
Location: Ellis and Navarro counties
Length: 35.214 mi[98] (56.671 km)
Existed: May 19, 1942[98]–present


FM 56[edit]

Farm to Market Road 56
Location: Bosque, Somervell, and Hood counties
Length: 77.908 mi[99] (125.381 km)
Existed: May 19, 1942[99]–present


FM 57[edit]

Farm to Market Road 57
Location: Jones and Fisher counties
Length: 29.553 mi[100] (47.561 km)
Existed: May 19, 1942[100]–present


FM 58[edit]

Farm to Market Road 58
Location: Angelina County
Length: 12.097 mi[101] (19.468 km)
Existed: May 19, 1942[101]–present

Farm to Market Road 58 is located in Angelina County. The road was designated on May 19, 1942 from US 59 south of Lufkin to a point on US 69 southeast of Lufkin and a point of US 69 south as a replacement for State Highway 299. On March 30, 1946 the road was extended south to a county road. On May 23, 1951 FM 58 was extended west to US 59 at Diboll. The same day a 1.1 mile section of FM 58 was transferred to FM 1877. On August 15, 1966 the section from FM 1818 to US 59 was transferred to FM 1818, bringing the highway to its final length.

FM 59[edit]

Farm to Market Road 59
Location: Henderson and Anderson counties
Length: 18.579 mi[102] (29.900 km)
Existed: May 19, 1942[102]–present

Farm to Market Road 59 is located in Henderson and Anderson counties. The road is 18.6 miles long.

The road begins at an intersection with SH 19 in Athens. From there, it goes southwest, passing through Cross Roads. The southern terminus is at US 287 in Cayuga. FM 59 was originally designated from SH 19 in Athens to Cross Roads. On June 11, 1945, it extended to Cayuga.

FM 60[edit]

Farm to Market Road 60
Location: Burleson and Brazos counties
Length: 43.688 mi[103] (70.309 km)
Existed: May 20, 1942[103]–present

Farm to Market Road 60 runs from SH 21, 6 miles (9.7 km) southwest of Caldwell, southeastward to SH 36 at Lyons; and from another point on SH 36 at Lyons, northeastward to FM 158 at Bryan. In Brazos County, it is also known as Raymond Stotzer Pkwy west of FM 2154 and University Drive east of FM 2154.

FM 60 was originally designated on May 20, 1942 from SH 6 (now a business route) to a point near the eastern bank of the Brazos River, replacing a portion of SH 230. On August 24, 1943, a second section was created from FM 50 4 miles east of Snook east to the State Experimental Sub Station, creating a gap. On October 6 in that same year, the western section extended to SH 36 near Lyons, replacing a section of FM 50. On August 1, 1944, FM 60 extended from a point near the eastern bank of the Brazos River to the State Experimental Sub Station, closing the gap. On October 31, 1957, it extended east to FM 158. On December 15, 1960, the section from SH 6 (now a business route) to FM 158 was transferred to SH 30. On June 2, 1967, FM 60 extended southwest 4 miles from SH 36. On February 29, 1968, FM 60 extended from the old location of SH 6 to the new location of SH 6. On November 26, 1969, FM 60 extended northwest to SH 21, replacing FM 111 from SH 21 southeast 10.8 miles to what is now Park Road 57. FM 111 was instead reassigned to its former spur connection, then numbered FM 2618. On May 23, 1978, it extended northeast from SH 6 to FM 158. On August 27, 1995, the section from SH 47 to FM 158 became an urban road.

FM 61[edit]

Farm to Market Road 61
Location: Young County
Length: 11.749 mi[104] (18.908 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[104]–present

Farm to Market Road 61 runs from US 380 just south of Newcastle southeastward through Fort Belknap to State Highway 67 (SH 67) in Graham.

FM 61 was originally designated on June 23, 1942 from SH 24 (now US 380) in Graham, northward to Loving. On June 18, 1945, it extended north to the Archer County Line. 7 days later, it extended north to US 281. On November 21, 1956, FM 61 extended west 4.5 miles from SH 24. On November 24, 1959, it extended west to SH 251 in Fort Belknap. On January 31, 1969, the section of FM 61 from US 380 in Graham northward to US 281 was transferred to SH 16. On May 6, 1974, one section in Graham was transferred to relocated SH 67. On February 23, 1993, it extended north to US 380 south of Newcastle, replacing a section of SH 251 and completing its current route.

FM 62[edit]

Farm to Market Road 62
Location: Polk County
Length: 9.738 mi[105] (15.672 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[105]–present


FM 63[edit]

Farm to Market Road 63
Location: Live Oak and McMullen counties
Length: 38.2 mi[106] (61.5 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942–December 15, 1960[106]

Farm to Market Road 63 is a retired farm-to-market road designation. At its greatest length, the highway stretched for approximately 38.2 miles (61.5 km) across Live Oak and McMullen counties.

FM 63 was formed from a section of SH 72 on June 23, 1942, beginning at Three Rivers and ending near Callihan. On July 9, 1945, it extended to Tilden. On May 22, 1947, it extended to Fowlerton. On December 15, 1960, FM 63 was cancelled, with the road being transferred back to SH 72.[106]

FM 64[edit]

Farm to Market Road 64
Location: Fannin and Delta counties
Length: 18.313 mi[107] (29.472 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[107]–present

Farm to Market Road 64 is a 18.3-mile (29.5 km) road, located in Fannin and Delta counties, that begins at SH 34 in Ladonia and passes through Pecan Gap and Antioch before ending at Bus. SH 24 in Cooper. The road also has major intersections with SH 24 in Cooper and several other Farm to Market Roads. FM 64 was designated in 1942 and was previously a state highway.

FM 64 begins at SH 34 on the northern edge of Ladonia in Fannin County. The road proceeds to the east away from town and is joined from the north by FM 904 before the combined route enters Pecan Gap and Delta County. On the west side of Pecan Gap, FM 904 separates turning to the south. On the east side of town at the intersection with FM 128, FM 64 turns to the south and continues away from town.[108]

At the intersection with FM 1532, FM 64 turns to the east. The road intersects FM 1528 from the south, then FM 3388 and FM 1530 to the north before entering Cooper from the northwest. The road then intersects SH 24 which bypasses central Cooper on the northwest, and ends at the state highway's business route through town.[109]

The road encounters terrain of gentle relief for its entire length.[110]

FM 64 was originally designated as State Highway 247 between 1936[111] and 1939 replacing part of SH 154.[112] The highway was originally described until June 23, 1942 as a route from Ladonia through Cooper to a point on SH 154 near the South Sulphur River.[112] That year, SH 247 was removed from the highway system, and FM 64 was created over the former SH 247 from a point approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west of Cooper to SH 154.[107] The road was extended westward to FM 128 at Pecan Gap On February 28, 1945,[107] and on February 21, 1946, the section from 4.5 miles west of Cooper to Pecan Gap was designated as a state highway to be marked for information and guidance of the traveling public as a Farm to Market Road. On November 23, 1948, the portion of the current road between SH 34 in Ladonia and Pecan Gap was added to FM 128 as an extension.[113] The portion of FM 128 between Ladonia and Pecan Gap was reassigned as an extension to FM 64 on February 26, 1949.[107][113] This extended FM 64 along the entire length of the former SH 247.[107][112] On May 18, 1953, the section from 4.5 miles west of Cooper to Pecan Gap was no longer designated as a state highway.

SH 154 north of Sulphur Springs was reassigned as part of SH 19 on August 24, 1960,[114][115] but was extended over SH 19 and FM 64 to SH 24 in Cooper on August 28 of the following year[115] terminating FM 64 at SH 24.[107] In 1968, SH 24 in Cooper was relocated over its present bypass, and its original route through town where FM 64 ends was signed as its business route.[116] From 1971 to 2003, SH 34 where FM 64 begins was also part of SH 50.[117]

FM 65[edit]

Farm to Market Road 65
Location: Zavala and Dimmit counties
Length: 13.368 mi[118] (21.514 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[118]–present


FM 66[edit]

Farm to Market Road 66
Location: Ellis and Hill counties
Length: 32.799 mi[119] (52.785 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[119]–present


FM 67[edit]

Farm to Market Road 67
Location: Hill County
Length: 23.943 mi[120] (38.533 km)
Existed: June 23, 1942[120]–present


FM 68[edit]

Farm to Market Road 68
Location: Fannin County
Length: 9.042 mi[121] (14.552 km)
Existed: August 1, 1942–present

Farm to Market Road 68 lies within Fannin County. The road was designated on August 1, 1942 from a point on SH 78 north of Bailey through Gomer to a point on SH 34 at or near Whatley School. The route was formerly State Highway 337.


FM 69[edit]

Farm to Market Road 69
Location: Hopkins and Wood counties
Length: 43.826 mi[122] (70.531 km)
Existed: September 22, 1942[122]–present


FM 70[edit]

Farm to Market Road 70
Location: Jim Wells and Nueces
Length: 61.227 mi[123] (98.535 km)
Existed: September 22, 1942[123]–present


FM 71[edit]

Farm to Market Road 71
Location: Northeast Texas
Length: 72.307 mi[124] (116.367 km)
Existed: September 22, 1942[124]–present


FM 72[edit]

Farm to Market Road 72
Location: Irion County
Length: 1.19 mi[125] (1.92 km)
Existed: February 12, 1943[125]–present


FM 73[edit]

Farm to Market Road 73
Location: Limestone County
Length: 14.348 mi[126] (23.091 km)
Existed: February 12, 1943[126]


FM 74[edit]

Farm to Market Road 74
Location: Cass County
Length: 5.007 mi[127] (8.058 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951[127]–present

Farm to Market Road 74 lies within Cass County. It was designated on May 23, 1951 from Loop 236 at Queen City east to FM 251, and from another point on FM 251 to FM 249 in Bloomburg.

FM 74 (1943)[edit]

The original FM 74 was designated on March 8, 1943 from Waxahachie to Maypearl. The road was cancelled on August 23, 1943 and became part of FM 66.

FM 75[edit]

Farm to Market Road 75
Location: Collin County
Length: 4.505 mi[128] (7.250 km)
Existed: April 15, 1943[128]–present

Farm to Market Road 75 lies within Collin County. The road begins at US 380 in Princeton and runs north to FM 1827.

FM 75 was formed on April 15, 1943 from SH 24 (now US 380) along the former route of SH 145 to an intersection with former SH 24 as a replacement for State Spur 73. On January 1, 1960 the road was extended to FM 1827. On November 15, 1977, the southern terminus was redesignated as US 380.

FM 76[edit]

Farm to Market Road 76
Location: El Paso County
Length: 29.417 mi[129] (47.342 km)
Existed: April 14, 1943[129]–present

Farm to Market Road 76 lies within El Paso County. The road begins at TX 20 in the Ascarate district of El Paso and heads southeastward to Clint, passing Loop 375 in the process. The highway then intersects with FM 1281, and remains parallel to I-10. Once it reaches Fabens, the highway turns southwest and then southeast and ends at FM 1109 near the Mexican border. Originally, the road went from US 80 in Ascarate to a point near Ysleta. The highway was expanded on May 18, 1944 from Ysleta to Clint, and then again on July 9, 1945 from Clint to Fabens. On December 16, 1948, the road expanded to a junction of FM 1109. On April 2, 1969, the highway was slightly modified due to the portion of US 80 being modified into TX 20. On June 27, 1995, the highway made a slight transfer, where the highway's present length was reached.


FM 77[edit]

Farm to Market Road 77
Location: Gonzales County
Length: 8.454 mi[130] (13.605 km)
Existed: July 14, 1949[130]–present

Farm to Market Road 77 lies within Gonzales County. The road begins at US 87 east of Nixon, then runs northeast to Schoolland and then southeast to FM 108.

FM 77 was originally designated on July 14, 1949 from US 87 east of Nixon northeast to Schoolland. The same day, the road was extended to FM 108.



FM 78[edit]

Farm to Market Road 78
Location: Bexar and Guadalupe counties
Length: 30.205 mi[131] (48.610 km)
Existed: August 3, 1943[131]–present

Farm to Market Road 78 is a 30.205 mi (48.610 km) farm-to-market road connecting San Antonio and Seguin. The western terminus of FM 78 is in Bexar County, near Fort Sam Houston. The eastern terminus is in Seguin. FM 78 provides a connection (in conjunction with I-35) between central San Antonio and Randolph Air Force Base. It also provides an alternate route (versus I-10 and Loop 1604) between Seguin and portions of the northeastern San Antonio metropolitan area. Between San Antonio and Cibolo, FM 78 is a four-lane road, dropping to a two-lane road until McQueeney, before becoming a four-lane divided route to I-10/SH 46.

FM 78 was designated on August 3, 1943.[131]

FM 79[edit]

Farm to Market Road 79
Location: Fannin and Lamar counties
Length: 26.925 mi[132] (43.332 km)
Existed: August 3, 1943[132]–present


FM 80[edit]

Farm to Market Road 80
Location: Freestone and Limestone counties
Length: 33.427 mi[133] (53.796 km)
Existed: August 3, 1943[133]–present


FM 81[edit]

Farm to Market Road 81
Location: Karnes and Goliad counties
Length: 38.099 mi[134] (61.314 km)
Existed: August 23, 1943[134]–present


FM 82[edit]

Farm to Market Road 82
Location: Newton and Jasper counties
Length: 10.328 mi[135] (16.621 km)
Existed: September 6, 1943[135]–present


FM 83[edit]

Farm to Market Road 83
Location: San Augustine and Sabine counties
Length: 36.622 mi[136] (58.937 km)
Existed: September 7, 1943[136]–present


FM 84[edit]

Farm to Market Road 84
Location: Grayson County
Length: 8.861 mi[137] (14.260 km)
Existed: October 6, 1943[137]–present

Farm to Market Road 84 connects US 75 to Lake Texoma. The 8.861-mile (14.260 km) route lies entirely within Grayson County.

FM 84 was designated on October 6, 1943, replacing a portion of SH 91. Since June 27, 1995, it has officially been designated as UR 84.[137]

FM 85[edit]

Farm to Market Road 85
Location: Ellis, Navarro, and Henderson counties
Length: 24.587 mi[138] (39.569 km)
Existed: October 6, 1943[138]–present


FM 86[edit]

Farm to Market Road 86
Location: Caldwell and Bastrop counties
Length: 20.702 mi[139] (33.317 km)
Existed: August 24, 1943–present

Farm to Market Road 86 is a farm to market road in Caldwell and Bastrop counties, Texas.[139]

FM 86 begins at the intersection of US 183 and FM 2984 in northern Luling.[140] The route travels primarily to the northeast through unincorporated Caldwell County. It ends just north of the Bastrop County line, at an intersection with FM 20 near Red Rock, in the community of Bateman.[139][141]

FM 86 was designated on August 24, 1943, replacing the entirety of State Highway 311.[139][142]


FM 87[edit]

Farm to Market Road 87
Location: Fannin County
Length: 2.375 mi[143] (3.822 km)
Existed: October 6, 1943[138]–present


FM 88[edit]

Farm to Market Road 88
Location: Willacy and Hidalgo counties
Length: 28.256 mi[144] (45.474 km)
Existed: November 15, 1943–present


FM 89[edit]

Farm to Market Road 89
Location: Taylor County
Length: 32.198 mi[145] (51.818 km)
Existed: December 16, 1943–present

Farm to Market Road 89 starts at FM 126 near Nolan and continues east to US 83 and US 84 in Abilene.

FM 89 starts just east of the NolanTaylor county line. The highway straddles the Callahan Divide, surrounded by wind turbines. At Abilene State Park, the terrain becomes flatter, as the road comes into Buffalo Gap. When coming into Buffalo Gap, FM 89 winds through town then continues northward toward Abilene. Upon entering the Wylie portion of Abilene, FM 89 becomes locally known as Buffalo Gap Road, and continues with this designation past the Mall of Abilene to the Winters Freeway, where FM 89 ends. Buffalo Gap Road continues northward. FM 89 was designated in 1942 from US 83/84 to Lake Abilene State Park. In 1947, the section from Abilene to Buffalo Gap was transferred to FM 613. In 1965, FM 89 regained its lost section, replacing a section of FM 613. In 1966, FM 89 extended west 3.3 miles. In 1967, it extended northwestward 2 miles. In 1968, it extended west to FM 126 replacing FM 2928 from US 277 to FM 126. In 1995, the section from US 83 to FM 707 became an urban road.

FM 90[edit]

Farm to Market Road 90
Location: Kaufman and Van Zandt counties
Length: 13.209 mi[146] (21.258 km)
Existed: March 30, 1944[146]–present

Farm to Market Road 90 is a 13.209 miles (21.258 km) long farm to market road located in Kaufman and Van Zandt counties.

The road begins at an intersection with SH 198 in Mabank, and heads north towards Prairieville. North of there, the road turns northeast to its northern terminus, an intersection with FM 47/FM 3227 near Whitton.[147]

FM 90 was formed on March 30, 1944 from SH 31 in Malakoff to Cross Roads. In 1961, FM 90 replaced a section of FM 316 from SH 31 to its current southern terminus. FM 90 also replaced FM 1617 from FM 316 to FM 85 (now SH 334). It also replaced a section of FM 85 from FM 47 to what was then FM 1617. IN 1985, the section from Mabank to Malakoff was transferred to SH 198 and the section from Cross Roads to Malakoff was renumbered as FM 3441.

FM 91[edit]

Farm to Market Road 91
Location: Hardeman and Wilbarger counties
Length: 26.131 mi[148] (42.054 km)
Existed: February 11, 1944[148]–present


FM 92[edit]

Farm to Market Road 92
Location: Tyler and Hardin counties
Length: 38.946 mi[149] (62.678 km)
Existed: February 11, 1944[149]–present


FM 93[edit]

Farm to Market Road 93
Location: Bell County
Length: 15.921 mi[150] (25.622 km)
Existed: February 11, 1944[150]–present


FM 94[edit]

Farm to Market Road 94
Location: Western North Texas
Length: 50.849 mi[151] (81.834 km)
Existed: March 18, 1947[151]–present


FM 95[edit]

Farm to Market Road 95
Location: Rusk and Nacogdoches counties
Length: 52.562 mi[152] (84.590 km)
Existed: May 18, 1944[152]–present


FM 96[edit]

Farm to Market Road 96
Location: Cass County
Length: 11.834 mi[153] (19.045 km)
Existed: May 23, 1951[153]–present


FM 96 (1944)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 96
Location: Eastland County
Existed: April 19, 1944–May 17, 1948

The original FM 96 was designated on April 19, 1944 from Gorman to Desdemona in Eastland County. FM 96 was cancelled on May 17, 1948 and became a portion of FM 8.

FM 97[edit]

Farm to Market Road 97
Location: Floyd and Motley counties
Length: 35.623 mi[154] (57.330 km)
Existed: May 18, 1944[154]–present


FM 98[edit]

Farm to Market Road 98
Location: Foard and Wilbarger counties
Length: 20.374 mi[155] (32.789 km)
Existed: May 18, 1944[155]–present


FM 99[edit]

Farm to Market Road 99
Location: South Texas
Length: 53.902 mi[156] (86.747 km)
Existed: April 19, 1944[156]–present


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The certified length given is shorter than the actual mileage, as the TxDOT description of FM 9 considers it to be discontinuous at rather than concurrent with US 80 in Waskom.
  2. ^ The certified length given is shorter than the actual mileage, as the TxDOT description of FM 16 considers it to be discontinuous at rather than concurrent with SH 110 in Van.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Farm to Market Road No. 1". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Farm to Market Road No. 2". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 
  3. ^ Texas Department of Transportation (2012) (PDF). Texas County Map Book (Map). 1:120,000. Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012 ed.). p. 539. http://www.dot.state.tx.us/apps-cg/grid_search/_includes/countymapbook2006/Pages/539.pdf. Retrieved 2011-01-05.[dead link]
  4. ^ a b c d e f Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Farm to Market Road No. 3". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 
  5. ^ Google Inc. "Overview map of Farm to Market Road 3 Distances Between Interchanges". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Farm+to+Market+Rd+3%2FMain+St&daddr=Farm+to+Market+Rd+3%2FMain+St+to:Farm+to+Market+Rd+3+to:Farm+to+Market+Rd+3+to:Farm+to+Market+Rd+3&geocode=FUd62QEdtWdF-g%3BFWh32QEd7EtF-g%3BFUaO2QEdHBlE-g%3BFSIf2wEdND5D-g%3BFagb3AEdpfZC-g&hl=en&mra=prev&sll=31.136997,-96.254311&sspn=0.016291,0.033023&ie=UTF8&ll=31.102922,-96.147194&spn=0.260748,0.528374&z=12. Retrieved 2011-01-05.
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  26. ^ "Portion of Ranch Road 12 to become 'Old Ranch Road 12'". San Marcos Mercury. 
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