Floyd County, Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Floyd County, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Floyd County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1876
Seat Floydada
Largest city Floydada
Area
 • Total 993 sq mi (2,572 km2)
 • Land 992 sq mi (2,569 km2)
 • Water 0.4 sq mi (1 km2), 0.04%
Population
 • (2010) 6,446
 • Density 8/sq mi (3/km²)
Congressional districts 13th, 19th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.floyd.tx.us

Floyd County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 6,446.[1] The seat of the county is Floydada.[2] The county is named for Dolphin Ward Floyd,[3] who died on his 32nd birthday, March 6, 1836, defending the Alamo.

The Matador Ranch, based in Motley County, once reached into Floyd County as well.[4]

Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Floyd County in the Texas House of Representatives.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 992.5 square miles (2,570.6 km2), of which 992.1 square miles (2,569.5 km2) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) (0.04%) is water.[6]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 3
1890 529 17,533.3%
1900 2,020 281.9%
1910 4,638 129.6%
1920 9,758 110.4%
1930 12,409 27.2%
1940 10,659 −14.1%
1950 10,535 −1.2%
1960 12,369 17.4%
1970 11,044 −10.7%
1980 9,834 −11.0%
1990 8,497 −13.6%
2000 7,771 −8.5%
2010 6,446 −17.1%
Est. 2012 6,367 −1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1850-2010[8]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[9] of 2010, there were 6,446 people.

The 2000 census showed 2,730 households and 2,110 families residing in the county. The population density was 8 people per square mile (3/km²). There were 3,221 housing units at an average density of 3 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.16% White, 3.38% Black or African American, 0.76% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 19.66% from other races, and 1.81% from two or more races. 45.93% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,730 households out of which 39.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.90% were married couples living together, 9.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.70% were non-families. 21.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out with 31.40% under the age of 18, 7.40% from 18 to 24, 24.40% from 25 to 44, 20.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,851, and the median income for a family was $32,123. Males had a median income of $25,487 versus $18,929 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,206. About 19.50% of families and 21.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.60% of those under age 18 and 16.50% of those age 65 or over.

Wind Energy Development[edit]

Floyd County is located in what many call the wind corridor of the United States. The wind corridor stretches from the Panhandle of Texas up into Minnesota, including some of the most wind rich states in the country. There are several reasons why Floyd County, Texas is ideal for wind development. Those reasons include the quality of wind in the region, the potential to connect into two different electric grid systems, and the scheduled transmission line build-out in the area.

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 127. 
  4. ^ "Matador Ranch," Historical marker, Texas Historical Commission, Motley County, Texas
  5. ^ "State Rep. Springer announces district tour July 30". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010 Retrieved December 16, 2013
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°04′N 101°18′W / 34.07°N 101.30°W / 34.07; -101.30