Rusk County, Texas

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Not to be confused with Rusk, Texas. ‹See Tfd›
Rusk County, Texas
Rusk County Courthouse, Henderson, TX IMG 2967.JPG
Rusk County Courthouse in Henderson
Map of Texas highlighting Rusk County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1843
Named for Thomas Jefferson Rusk
Seat Henderson
Largest city Henderson
Area
 • Total 938 sq mi (2,429 km2)
 • Land 924 sq mi (2,393 km2)
 • Water 14 sq mi (36 km2), 1.5%
Population
 • (2010) 53,330
 • Density 52/sq mi (20/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.rusk.tx.us
Rusk County Library in downtown Henderson
Rusk County Assessor's Office in Henderson

Rusk County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 53,330.[1] Its county seat is Henderson.[2] The county is named for Thomas Jefferson Rusk, a secretary of war of the Republic of Texas.

Rusk County is part of the Longview, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Longview–Marshall, TX Combined Statistical Area.

Travis Clardy, a Republican from Nacogdoches, is the Texas State Representative for House District 11, which includes Rusk County. Trent Ashby, a Republican from Lufkin who was born in Rusk County in 1972, represents District 57, which includes Angelina and several other mostly rural East Texas counties.

History[edit]

Originally a part of Nacogdoches County, Rusk was established as its own county by the Congress of the Republic of Texas on January 16, 1843. By 1850, it was the second most populous county in Texas out of the 78 counties that had been organized at that time, according to the 1850 census. Rusk County's population was 8,148 at this time; it was surpassed only by Harrison County with 11,822 people.

Rusk County was one of twenty-five entirely dry counties in the State of Texas, until January 2012. The city of Henderson, in Rusk County opted to sell and serve beer and wine.[3]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 939 square miles (2,430 km2), of which 924 square miles (2,390 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (1.61%) is water.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 8,148
1860 15,803 93.9%
1870 16,916 7.0%
1880 18,986 12.2%
1890 18,559 −2.2%
1900 26,099 40.6%
1910 26,946 3.2%
1920 31,689 17.6%
1930 32,484 2.5%
1940 51,023 57.1%
1950 42,348 −17.0%
1960 36,421 −14.0%
1970 34,102 −6.4%
1980 41,382 21.3%
1990 43,735 5.7%
2000 47,372 8.3%
2010 53,330 12.6%
Est. 2012 54,026 1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1850-2010[5]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 47,372 people, 17,364 households, and 12,727 families residing in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 19,867 housing units at an average density of 22 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.89% White, 19.21% Black or African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 4.22% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. 8.44% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 17,364 households out of which 32.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were non-families. 24.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.90% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 15.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 104.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,898, and the median income for a family was $39,185. Males had a median income of $30,956 versus $19,749 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,674. About 10.90% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.80% of those under age 18 and 13.00% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve Rusk County:

Rusk County's first officially authorized school was the Rusk County Academy.[7]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 23, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "TABC map of wet/dry counties as of June 2012". Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. Retrieved 2012-07-11. 
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 23, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010". Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved December 23, 2013. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  7. ^ "Rusk County Academy." Handbook of Texas. Retrieved on October 6, 2010.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°07′N 94°46′W / 32.11°N 94.76°W / 32.11; -94.76