Attadale railway station

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Attadale National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Atadal
Attadalestation.jpg
A Class 158 DMU departing Attadale for Kyle
Location
Place Attadale
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°23′40″N 5°27′19″W / 57.3945°N 5.4553°W / 57.3945; -5.4553Coordinates: 57°23′40″N 5°27′19″W / 57.3945°N 5.4553°W / 57.3945; -5.4553
Grid reference NG924390
Operations
Station code ATT
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 1
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Increase 968
2012/13 Decrease 658
2013/14 Increase 998
2014/15 Decrease 784
2015/16 Increase 820
History
Original company Dingwall and Skye Railway
Pre-grouping Highland Railway
Post-grouping LMSR
1880 Station opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Attadale from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Attadale railway station is a remote railway station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line, serving the village of Attadale on Loch Carron in the Highlands, northern Scotland.

History[edit]

The station was opened in 1880 by the Dingwall and Skye Railway, but operated from the outset by the Highland Railway.

When the D&SR were forced to cut back the railway during its planning, Attadale was initially chosen as the planned terminus of the shortened line, to allow a suitable location near Loch Carron to build a pier adjacent to the station for steam boats to berth. However, more detailed planning proved this area of the loch quite shallow, which would have meant the large cost of building an extraordinarily long pier. Instead, the line was to terminate 5 miles further on at Stromeferry, where a deeper section of the loch could be found, meaning the steamers could berth more easily and more closely to the station at a shorter, less expensive pier. Attadale then opened as a request stop ten years after the Dingwall & Skye Railway commenced services.

Initially, Attadale station had just a single wooden shelter for passengers, whilst a large red flag was used for signalling the train to stop. Taken into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923, the line then passed on to the Scottish Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948. When sectorisation was introduced by British Rail, the station became part of ScotRail until the privatisation of British Rail.

The station has one platform and a simple but covered brick waiting room. It featured in episode one of the Channel 4 documentary series Paul Merton's Secret Stations on 1 May 2016, when presenter Paul Merton alighted there en route to visiting a salmon breeding farm on the shores of Loch Carron.[1]

Services[edit]

Four trains each way call (on request) on weekdays/Saturdays and one each way all year on Sundays, plus a second from May to late September only.[2]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Strathcarron   Abellio ScotRail
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Stromeferry

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Programme Information - Paul Merton's Secret Stations"4 Press website; Retrieved 18 May 2016
  2. ^ GB eNRT May 2016 Edition, Table 239

References[edit]