Upper Tyndrum railway station

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Upper Tyndrum National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Taigh an Droma Uachdrach[1]
Upper Tyndrum Railway Station with a train for Mallaig.JPG
Upper Tyndrum station, looking north towards Fort William and Mallaig
Location
Place Tyndrum
Local authority Stirling
Coordinates 56°26′04″N 4°42′13″W / 56.4345°N 4.7036°W / 56.4345; -4.7036Coordinates: 56°26′04″N 4°42′13″W / 56.4345°N 4.7036°W / 56.4345; -4.7036
Grid reference NN333302
Operations
Station code UTY
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2012/13 Decrease 3,396
2013/14 Increase 3,940
2014/15 Increase 4,562
2015/16 Increase 4,790
2016/17 Decrease 4,512
History
Original company West Highland Railway
Pre-grouping North British Railway
Post-grouping LNER
7 August 1894 Station opened as Tyndrum[2]
21 September 1956 Station renamed as Tyndrum Upper[2]
1988 Station renamed as Upper Tyndrum[2]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Upper Tyndrum from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Upper Tyndrum railway station is one of two railway stations serving the small village of Tyndrum in Scotland. It is on the Fort William route of the highly scenic West Highland Line. Services are operated by Abellio ScotRail. In 2005/06 it was the least used station on the West Highland Line, probably because of its position up a hill above the village, as opposed to Tyndrum Lower on the Oban branch, which also offers services to and from Crianlarich and destinations to the south (usually at about the same time, as the trains tend to connect at Crianlarich). Following a timetable change in 2014, Tyndrum Lower gets extra services so this station gets fewer services

History[edit]

Originally named "Tyndrum", this station opened concurrently with the West Highland Railway in 1894, as the second station in the village. In 1956,[2] British Rail added the suffix "Upper" to the station's name, to distinguish it from the station on the Callander and Oban Line which then became known as Tyndrum Lower.

The station name was altered to "Upper Tyndrum" upon the introduction of RETB (see below), to reduce the risk of it being confused with "Tyndrum Lower" in radio communications.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Crianlarich   Abellio ScotRail
West Highland Line
  Bridge of Orchy
Crianlarich   Caledonian Sleeper
Highland Caledonian Sleeper
  Bridge of Orchy
  Historical railways  
Crianlarich   North British Railway
West Highland Railway
  Bridge of Orchy

Services[edit]

2011 services[edit]

Monday to Saturday, northbound, Upper Tyndrum has three services to Mallaig and one service to Fort William (Highland Caledonian Sleeper). Southbound, there are three services to Glasgow Queen Street and one service to London Euston (Highland Caledonian Sleeper, Saturdays excepted). On Sundays, there is just one service northbound to Mallaig and two services southbound to Glasgow Queen Street and London Euston.

2016 services[edit]

Monday to Saturday, northbound, Upper Tyndrum has three services to Mallaig and one service to Fort William. Southbound, there are three services to Glasgow Queen Street and one service to London Euston (Saturdays excepted).

On Sundays, there is just one service northbound to Mallaig in winter and two in summer, one service southbound to Glasgow Queen Street (two in summer) and one service to London Euston.[3] The Highland Sleeper also calls at Glasgow Queen Street Low Level to set down only on each evening that it operates, so passengers can use this train to reach Glasgow (and Edinburgh).

Signalling[edit]

The signal box, which had 15 levers, was situated on the island platform. From its opening in 1894, the West Highland Railway was worked throughout by the electric token system.

In 1967, the method of working between Crianlarich and Rannoch was changed to the Scottish Region Tokenless Block system. The Down loop at Tyndrum Upper was signalled for running in either direction and the signal box was able to 'switch out' when not required.

In August 1985, the method of working between Crianlarich and Rannoch reverted to the electric token block system. The semaphore signals were removed on 22 December 1985 in preparation for the introduction of Radio Electronic Token Block (RETB).

The RETB system was commissioned by British Rail between Helensburgh Upper and Upper Tyndrum on 27 March 1988. On 29 May of the same year, the RETB spread north to Fort William Junction, resulting in the closure of Upper Tyndrum signal box (amongst others). The RETB is controlled from a purpose-built Signalling Centre at Banavie railway station. Upper Tyndrum station is the boundary between the two signalling interlockings and the areas of control of the two signalmen.

The Train Protection & Warning System was installed in 2003.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brailsford 2017, Gaelic/English Station Index.
  2. ^ a b c d Butt (1995), page 236
  3. ^ Table 227 National Rail timetable, May 2016

Sources[edit]

  • Brailsford, Martyn, ed. (December 2017) [1987]. Railway Track Diagrams 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (6th ed.). Frome: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-9-8. 
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137. 
  • Jowett, Alan (2000). Jowett's Nationalised Railway Atlas (1st ed.). Penryn, Cornwall: Atlantic Transport Publishers. ISBN 978-0-906899-99-1. OCLC 228266687. 

External links[edit]