Cannabivarin

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Cannabivarin
Cannabivarin.svg
Cannabivarin molecule ball.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
6,6,9-Trimethyl-3-propyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-1-ol
Other names
6,6,9-Trimethyl-3-propyl-6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
MeSH cannabivarin
Properties
C19H22O2
Molar mass 282.38 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Cannabivarin, also known as cannabivarol or CBV, is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in minor amounts in the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. It is an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with the side chain shortened by two methylene bridges (-CH2-). CBV is an oxidation product of tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV, THV).[1]

Chemistry[edit]

It has no double bond isomers nor stereoisomers.

Legal status[edit]

It is not scheduled by Convention on Psychotropic Substances.

United States[edit]

CBV is not scheduled at the federal level in the United States,[2] but it could be considered an analog (of THC), in which case, sales or possession intended for human consumption could be prosecuted under the Federal Analog Act.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keith Bailey, Denise Gagné (October 1975). "Distinction of synthetic cannabidiol, cannabichromene, and cannabivarin by GLC using on-column methylation". Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 64 (10): 1719–1720. doi:10.1002/jps.2600641033. 
  2. ^ §1308.11 Schedule I.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Erowid Compounds found in Cannabis sativa