European Canadian

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European Canadians
Total population
(25,186,890[1]
76.6% of the total Canadian population[dubious ] (2011)
)
Regions with significant populations
All areas of Canada
Languages
Mostly English • French • Historically Scottish Gaelic • Irish were spoken in certain regions
Religion
Predominantly Christian
also Judaism • Deism • Agnostic • Atheist • Muslim • Baha'i • pagan/Wiccan • Unitarian Universalism

European Canadians (also known as Euro-Canadians) are Canadians with ancestry from Europe.[2]

The French were the first Europeans to establish a continuous presence in what is now Canada. Hélène Desportes is considered the first white child born in New France. She was born circa 1620, to Pierre Desportes (born Lisieux, Normandie, France) and Francoise Langlois.[3]

In the 2006 census, the largest European ancestry groups were English (21.03%), French (15.82%), Scottish (15.11%), Irish (13.94%), German (10.18%), Italian (4.63%). However, the country's largest self-reported ethnic origin is "Canadian" (accounting for 32.22% of the population). Since 1996, "Canadian" as an ethnic group has been added to census questionnaires for possible ancestry. English-Canadians, British-Canadians and French-Canadians are considered an under-count.[4] In the National Household Survey Profile, Canada, 2011 10,563,805 people identified as "Canadian" as their ethnic group.[5]

History[edit]

Number of European Canadians 1871 - 2011
Year Population  % of Canada R Year Population  % of Canada R
1871 97.0% [6][7] 2006
1881 95.84% [7] 2011 76.7% [8]
1901 96.24% [7] 2016
1911 94.35% [7]
1921 97.5% [7]
1931 97.7% [7]
1941 97.8% [6]
1951 96.9% [6]
1961 96.8% [6]
1966 96.8% [6]
1971 96.3% [6]
1981 93.0% [9]
1991
2001

Today[edit]

The majority of Canada's population is still made up of European immigrants and their descendants, though their percentage has been decreasing every year since the 1970s. Elements of Aboriginal, French, British and more recent immigrant customs, languages and religions have combined to form the culture of Canada and thus a Canadian identity. Canada has also been strongly influenced by its linguistic, geographic and economic neighbour, the United States.

Cultural icons[edit]

Music[edit]

O Canada.svg
Robert Stanley Weir 1899.png
Scottish-Canadian Robert Stanley Weir wrote the English lyrics to O Canada.

Another area of cultural influence are Canadian Patriotic songs:

Unofficial national anthem[edit]

  • The Maple Leaf Forever - is an older but unofficial national anthem written by Scotsman Alexander Muir in 1867.[13] It was in consideration for official national anthem, however, no French version was ever written, so, it was never popular with Francophones.[14]

Ancestry[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Household Survey (NHS) Profile, 2011". Statcan.gc.ca. 2013-05-08. Retrieved 2013-05-27. 
  2. ^ www.oxforddictionaries.com Euro-Canadian definition
  3. ^ Bennett, Ethel M. G. Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. 2000. "Hélène Desportes". Accessed August 10, 2007.
  4. ^ The Changing Face of Canada: Essential Readings in Population
  5. ^ "National Household Survey Profile". Statistics Canada. 2011. Retrieved February 13, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f Table 1: Population by Ethnic Origin, Canada, 1921-1971 Page: 2
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Canada Year Book 1922-23 Racial-origins Page: 158-59" (PDF). Statistics Canada. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  8. ^ "National Household Survey Profile". Statistics Canada. 2011
  9. ^ Nationalism and National Integration By Anthony H. Birch
  10. ^ "'O Canada'". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2008-04-22. 
  11. ^ Cite error: The named reference anthem-fr was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  12. ^ Department of Canadian Heritage. "Canadian Heritage – National Anthem: O Canada". Queen's Printer for Canada. Retrieved June 29, 2010. 
  13. ^ Anonymous. "Marches". L'Association Canadienne De L'Infanterie/Canadian Infantry Association. Retrieved May 4, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Canadian Heritage – Patriotic Songs". Pch.gc.ca. March 3, 2010. Retrieved October 29, 2011. 

Further reading[edit]

Statistical[edit]