List of U.S. presidential campaign slogans

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1840–96[edit]

1840[edit]

1844[edit]

1848[edit]

1852[edit]

1856[edit]

  • "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, Fremont" – 1856 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John Fremont
  • "Fremont and freedom" - John Fremont
  • "We'll Buck 'em in '56" - James Buchanan, playing on "Old Buck", the nickname associated with his last name. (Also "We Po'ked 'em in '44, we Pierced 'em in '52, and we'll Buck 'em in '56". See Franklin Pierce, 1852.)

1860[edit]

1864[edit]

  • "Don't change horses in midstream" – Abraham Lincoln.
  • "Union, liberty, peace" - Abraham Lincoln
  • "For Union and Constitution" - Abraham Lincoln (Also "The Union and the Constitution")
  • "An honorable, permanent and happy peace." - George B. McClellan

1868[edit]

  • "Let Us Have Peace" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Vote as You Shot" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Peace, Union, and constitutional government." - Horatio Seymour

1872[edit]

1876[edit]

  • "Tilden and Reform" - Samuel Tilden
  • "Honest Sam Tilden" - Samuel Tilden
  • "Tilden or Blood!" – 1877 slogan of Tilden supporters during conflict that led to the Compromise of 1877
  • "Hayes the true and Wheeler too" - Slogan and campaign song title for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler, with song adapted from 1840's "Tippecanoe and Tyler too".
  • "The boys in blue vote for Hayes and Wheeler" - Hayes appeal to fellow Union Army veterans.

1884[edit]

  • "Rum, Romanism and Rebellion" – Republican attack because of supposed Democratic support for consuming alcoholic beverages, Catholic immigrants, and the Confederacy.
  • "Ma, Ma, where's my Pa?" – Used by James G. Blaine supporters against Grover Cleveland. The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added "Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!"
  • "Burn this letter!" - Cleveland supporters' attack on Blaine's supposed corruption, quoting a line from Blaine correspondence that became public.
  • "Tell the Truth!" - Cleveland's advice to his supporters after the allegations of his illegitimate child came to light.
  • "Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the state of Maine!" - Cleveland campaign attack on Blaine's alleged corruption in office.

1888[edit]

  • "Rejuvenated Republicanism"[1]Benjamin Harrison
  • "Grandfather's hat fits Ben!"[5] - Benjamin Harrison, referring to his grandfather, William Henry Harrison
  • "Unnecessary taxation oppresses industry." - Grover Cleveland
  • "Reduce the tariff on necessaries of life." - Grover Cleveland

1892[edit]

  • "Our choice: Cleve and Steve." - Grover Cleveland and Adlai Stevenson
  • "Tariff Reform" - Grover Cleveland
  • "No Force Bill." - Grover Cleveland (To which southern Democrats appended "No Negro Domination!")
  • "Harrison and Protection." - Benjamin Harrison
  • "Protection-Reciprocity-Honest Money." - Benjamin Harrison

1896[edit]

1900–96[edit]

1900[edit]

  • "Four more years of the full dinner pail" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley
  • "Let Well Enough Alone" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley
  • "Liberty. Justice. Humanity." - William Jennings Bryan
  • "Equal Rights to All, Special Privileges to None" - William Jennings Bryan

1904[edit]

1908[edit]

1912[edit]

  • "It is nothing but fair to leave Taft in the chair" - William Howard Taft
  • "Win with Wilson" - Woodrow Wilson
  • "Vote for 8 Hour Wilson" - Woodrow Wilson
  • "I am for Wilson and an 8 Hour Day" - Woodrow Wilson
  • "The man of the eight hour day" - Woodrow Wilson
  • "A Square Deal All Around" - Theodore Roosevelt

1916[edit]

  • "America First and America Efficient" - Charles Evans Hughes
  • "He has kept us out of war." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "He proved the pen mightier than the sword." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in the East, Peace in the West, Thank God for Woodrow Wilson." - Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in Europe - Peace in America - God Bless Wilson" - Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

1920[edit]

1924[edit]

1928[edit]

  • "Who but Hoover?" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.[6]
  • "A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover[7]
  • "Honest. Able. Fearless." - Al Smith
  • "All for 'Al' and 'Al' for All." - Al Smith
  • "Make your wet dreams come true." - Al Smith, referring to his stand in favor of repealing Prohibition.

1932[edit]

  • "Happy Days Are Here Again" – 1932 slogan by Democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • "We are turning the corner" – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover.

1936[edit]

  • "Defeat the New Deal and Its Reckless Spending" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Let's Get Another Deck" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon, using a card game metaphor to answer the "new deal" cards metaphor of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Let's Make It a Landon-Slide" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Life, Liberty, and Landon" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Remember Hoover!" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Forward with Roosevelt" - Franklin Roosevelt

1940[edit]

  • "No Third Term" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "No Fourth Term Either" - Wendell Willkie
  • "Roosevelt for Ex-President" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell Willkie
  • "There's No Indispensable Man" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "We Want Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Win with Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Better A Third Termer than a Third Rater" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "I Want Roosevelt Again!" - Franklin Roosevelt
  • "Willkie for the Millionaires, Roosevelt for the Millions" - Franklin Roosevelt
  • "Carry on with Roosevelt" - Franklin Roosevelt

1944[edit]

  • "Don't swap horses in midstream" – 1944 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Roosevelt. The slogan was also used by Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.
  • "We are going to win this war and the peace that follows" – 1944 campaign slogan in the midst of World War II by Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Dewey or don't we" - Thomas E. Dewey

1948[edit]

1952[edit]

1956[edit]

  • "I still like Ike" – 1956 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • "Peace and Prosperity" – 1956 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • "Adlai and Estes - The Bestest" - Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver
  • "The Winning Team" - Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver

1960[edit]

  • "A time for greatness 1960" – U.S. presidential campaign theme of John F. Kennedy (Kennedy also used "We Can Do Better" and "Leadership for the 60s").
  • "For the future" - Richard Nixon

1964[edit]

  • "All the way with LBJ" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson
  • "In Your Heart, You Know He's Right" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barry Goldwater
  • "In Your Guts, You Know He's Nuts" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson supporters, answering Goldwater's slogan

1968[edit]

1972[edit]

  • "Nixon Now" – Richard M. Nixon, 1972[9] (also, "Nixon Now, More than Ever")
  • "Come home, America" - George McGovern, 1972[10]
  • "Acid, Amnesty, and Abortion for All" – 1972 anti-Democratic Party slogan, from a statement made to reporter Bob Novak by Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (as related in Novak's 2007 memoir, Prince of Darkness)
  • "Dick Nixon Before He Dicks You" - Popular anti-Nixon slogan, 1972[11]
  • "They can't lick our Dick" - Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[12]
  • "Don't change Dicks in the midst of a screw, vote for Nixon in '72" - Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[12]

1976[edit]

  • "He’s making us proud again" – Gerald Ford
  • "Not Just Peanuts" – Jimmy Carter[1]
  • "A Leader, for a Change" (also "Leaders, for a Change") – Jimmy Carter
  • "Why not the Best?" - Jimmy Carter

1980[edit]

1984[edit]

  • "It's Morning Again in America" – Ronald Reagan
  • "For New Leadership" (also "America Needs New Leadership") - Walter Mondale
  • "Where's the beef?" - Walter Mondale. An advertising slogan used by the restaurant chain Wendy's to imply that its competitors served sandwiches with relatively small contents of beef. Used by Mondale to imply that the program policies of rival candidate Gary Hart lacked actual substance.

1988[edit]

1992[edit]

  • "For People, for a Change" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "It's Time to Change America" – a theme of the 1992 U.S. presidential campaign of Bill Clinton
  • "Putting People First" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "It's the economy, stupid" – originally intended for an internal audience it became the de facto slogan for the Bill Clinton campaign
  • "Stand by the President" - George H. W. Bush
  • "A Proud Tradition" - George H. W. Bush
  • "Don't Change the Team in the Middle of the Stream" - George H. W. Bush and Dan Quayle
  • "America First" - Pat Buchanan
  • "Down with King George" - Pat Buchanan, in reference to Bush
  • "Send Bush a Message" - Pat Buchanan
  • "Conservative of the Heart" - Pat Buchanan
  • "A Voice for the Voiceless" - Pat Buchanan
  • "Ross for Boss" – Ross Perot
  • "I'm Ross, and you're the Boss!" – Ross Perot
  • "Leadership for a Change - Ross Perot

1996[edit]

  • "Building a bridge to the twenty-first century" – Bill Clinton
  • "Bob Dole. A Better Man. For a Better America." or "The Better Man for a Better America" - Bob Dole
  • "Go Pat Go" - Pat Buchanan

2000–present[edit]

2000[edit]

2004[edit]

2008[edit]

  • "Yes We Can " – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "Change We Can Believe In." Also, simply: "Change." – 2008 US presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama
  • "Change We Need." and "Change." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Fired up! Ready to go!" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "Hope" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Country First" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John McCain
  • "Reform, prosperity and peace" – 2008 U.S. Presidential motto of John McCain.[13][14]
  • "People Fighting Back", and "We'll fight back" – Ralph Nader campaign slogan
  • "Ready for change, ready to lead" – Hillary Clinton campaign slogan, also "Big Challenges, Real Solutions: Time to Pick a President," "In to Win," "Working for Change, Working for You," and "The strength and experience to make change happen."[15]

2012[edit]

2016[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Presidential Campaign Slogans
  2. ^ Berliner, David C. (June 3, 1973). "Frelinghuysen: Moderate Republican". New York Times. New York, NY. 
  3. ^ Heritage-Slater Political Memorabilia and Americana Auction Catalog #625. Heritage Numismatic Auctions, Inc.: Dallas, TX. 2005. p. 179. 
  4. ^ "Slogans in Presidential Campaigns" (PDF). The Center for Civic Education. Retrieved 2013-10-18. 
  5. ^ Conradt, Stacy (October 8, 2008). "The Quick 10: 10 Campaign Slogans of the Past". Mental Floss. Retrieved 27 May 2016. 
  6. ^ Gallery 5: The Logical Candidate, The Hoover Library & Museum.
  7. ^ Which president promised "a chicken in every pot"?, infoplease.
  8. ^ Nichols, John (December 11, 2005). "Eugene McCarthy's Lyrical Politics". The Nation (blog). Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  9. ^ Nixon Now (Nixon, 1972), Museum of the Moving Image (2012).
  10. ^ Nichols, John (October 19, 2012). "The Genius of McGovern's 'Come Home, America' Vision". The Nation. New York, NY. 
  11. ^ Dudden, Arthur Power "American Humor", Oxford Press (1987), pg. 67
  12. ^ a b "Will Rabbe, Producer, Journalist & Historian - Blog - Most Underrated Political Slogan: "They Can't Lick Our Dick"". willrabbe.com. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  13. ^ Montopoli, Brian (June 17, 2008). "McCain's Slogan: "Reform, Prosperity and Peace"". CBS News. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  14. ^ Hollywood double takes (#3) http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/hollywood-double-takes-actors-famous-faces-gallery-1.76789[not in citation given]
  15. ^ Smith, Ben (January 3, 2008). "Undecided: Hillary keeps shifting slogans". Politico. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  16. ^ a b Handy, Bruce (October 1, 2015). "Donald Trump vs. Carly Fiorina: The Definitive Scorecard". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  17. ^ Johnson, Jenna (22 August 2016). "Donald Trump to African American and Hispanic voters: 'What do you have to lose?'". Washington Post. Retrieved 10 May 2017. a question that Trump first posed to African American voters during a rally in North Carolina on Thursday. He then repeated it at a rally in Michigan on Friday evening and Virginia on Saturday night. In Ohio on Monday, Trump expanded his pitch to include Hispanics. 
  18. ^ Fiore, Mark (1 September 2016). "What Do You Have to Lose?". TheProgressive.com. The Progressive Inc. Retrieved 10 May 2017. Between his new “what the hell do you have to lose” campaign slogan and . . . 
  19. ^ Feldman, Josh. "Trump Rally Erupts in 'CNN Sucks!' Chant on Election Eve". Retrieved 10 December 2016. 
  20. ^ Benen, Steve (July 26, 2016). "Michelle Obama: 'When they go low, we go high'". MSNBC. Retrieved 2016-10-19. 
  21. ^ Sweeney, Dan (December 28, 2015). "Jeb comes to South Florida, sans exclamation mark". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  22. ^ Nelson, Angela (December 26, 2015). "Huckabee's Hope is From "Tree Town" to Higher Ground". KIOW. Pilot Knob Broadcasting. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  23. ^ "2016 Presidential Campaign Slogan Survey". tagline guru. Retrieved 2015-10-19. 
  24. ^ Allen, Mike (April 6, 2015). "Rand Paul unveils populist, anti-establishment slogan". Politico. Retrieved 2015-12-30.