Christian Democratic National Peasants' Party

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Union for Romanian Reconstruction)
Jump to: navigation, search
Christian-Democratic National Peasants' Party
Partidul Național Țărănesc Creștin Democrat
Leader Aurelian Pavelescu
Founded December 1989
Headquarters Bd. Carol I, nr. 24
Bucharest
Ideology

Christian democracy[1] Agrarianism[2] Liberalism

Monarchism
Political position Centre to Centre-right
European affiliation EPP (1987-2017)
International affiliation Centrist Democrat International
European Parliament group No MEPs
Colours Green and Blue
Seats in the Senate
0 / 136
Seats in the Chamber of Deputies
0 / 329
Seats in the European Parliament
0 / 33
Mayors
3 / 3,186
[3]
County Councilors
0 / 1,434
[3]
Local Council Councilors
137 / 40,067
[3]
Website
www.pntcd.ro

The Christian Democratic National Peasants' Party (Romanian: Partidul Național Țărănesc Creștin Democrat, abbreviated PNȚ-CD) is a Christian democratic and agrarian political party in Romania. It claims to be the successor of the National Peasants' Party (created from the merger of the Romanian National Party from Transylvania and Peasants' Party). The party was excluded from the European People's Party (EPP) in June 2017.[4]

History[edit]

1989-1992[edit]

The Christian Democratic National Peasants' Party was (re)-founded by Corneliu Coposu, Ioan Alexandru, and Ion Rațiu in December, 1989, being thus the first officially registered political party after the fall of Communism. The party competed in the 1990 elections, where it ranked 4th with 2.5% (or 348,637 votes) and supported Ion Rațiu for president. The PNȚ-CD presidential candidate ranked 3rd, with 4.3% (or 617,007 votes).

From left to right: Ion Diaconescu, Corneliu Coposu, and Ion Rațiu at a 1990 manifestation held in Bucharest

Given the political dominance of the National Salvation Front (FSN) that was exerted prior and after the first free elections in post-1989 Romania, the PNȚ-CD decided to form a consistent alliance of centre-right parties aiming mainly to oppose it.

As a result, in 1991, most notably alongside the National Liberal Party (but also with other noteworthy civic organisations, foundations, and minor additional right-leaning political parties), the PNȚ-CD formed the Romanian Democratic Convention (CDR).

Eventually, the PNȚ-CD would affirm itself as the most dominant internal political force for much of the convention's existence. For the period 1990-1992, PNȚ-CD was one of the main opposition parties.

1992-1996[edit]

At the 1992 elections, the party ran on a common CDR list (along with other allied parties within the convention) and supported the candidacy of Emil Constantinescu as President of Romania. Consequently, the CDR ranked 2nd, having scored 20.16% (or 2,210,722 votes), while Emil Constantinescu managed to qualify in the second round of the presidential election where he finished second with 38.57% (or 4,641,207 votes). For the period 1992-1996, the party was the main opposition force in the Parliament of Romania.

1996-2000[edit]

At the 1996 elections, CDR managed to rank 1st, with 30.70% (or 3,772,084 votes), and once again supported the candidacy of Emil Constantinescu, who also managed to win the presidency with 54.41% (or 7,057,906 votes). For the period 1996-2000, PNȚ-CD was the most important governing party within the CDR, being also part of a grand coalition which included the Democratic Party (PD) and the Democratic Union of Hungarians in Romania (UDMR/RMDSZ).

At the 2000 elections, PNȚ-CD ran on a common CDR 2000 list and scored 5.30% (or 575,706 votes), being unable to pass the electoral threshold required for an alliance. This weak electoral result was primarily owed to the fragmentation of the alliance and the scission of the Romanian right into several other parties as well as to the tumultuous previous governing term. For the period 2000-2004, PNȚ-CD was in extra-parliamentary opposition.

2004-2008[edit]

Party headquarters in Bucharest

At the 2004 elections, PNȚ-CD ran independently, having scored 1.9% (or 196,027 votes), failing this time as well to surpass the electoral threshold. The party supported the presidential candidacy of Gheorghe Ciuhandu, former mayor of Timișoara. Ciuhandu ranked 5th, with 1.9% (or 198,394 votes).

In March, 2005, PNȚ-CD voted to change its name to the Christian Democratic People's Party (Partidul Popular Creștin-Democrat, PPCD) after the unification with the Union for Romanian Reconstruction. Eventually, it returned to its original name (PNȚ-CD). The party did not compete in the 2008 legislative elections.

Afterwards, the party was split between a wing sustained by Marian-Petre Miluț supporting Aurelian Pavelescu as president (who decided on an alliance with the then governing Democratic Liberal Party) and one supporting former Prime Minister and Bucharest mayor Victor Ciorbea as president (who, at that time, favoured an alliance with the National Liberal Party).[5]

2011-present[edit]

Victor Ciorbea was elected on June 18, 2011 president of the party. In September 2011 the Bucharest Courthouse (responsible for the parties registry) recognised Victor Ciorbea as party president.[6] Nonetheless, the split continued until Ciorbea left the party (until October, 2012 namely) in order to become a senator on PNL's lists. Pavelescu was subsequently recognized as president and the fractions were dissolved.

For the 2012 legislative elections, PNȚ-CD ran on a common Right Romania Alliance (ARD), along with the Democratic Liberal Party (PDL) and the Civic Force (FC). The party won one senator seat and one deputy seat. On April 23, 2013, Pavelescu was elected president of the party.

At the 2014 European Parliament election, the party only gained 0.89% of the vote,[7] with candidates like former EP member Sebastian Bodu and the current party president, Aurelian Pavelescu, opening the list.

Motto[edit]

Its motto as of 2006 is Fiecare contează (Everyone counts). At the 2014 European elections PNȚCD motto was Renaștem pentru România ta! (Reborn for your Romania!)

Electoral performance[edit]

Election Votes  % Chamber Senate Position Government
1990 348,637 2.50
12 / 395
1 / 119
4th Opposition
1992 2,210,722 20.16 (as CDR)
41 / 341
21 / 143
2nd (as CDR) Opposition
1996 3,772,084 30.7 (as CDR)
83 / 343
27 / 143
1st (as CDR) Coalition
2000 575,706 5.30 (as CDR 2000)
0 / 345
0 / 140
6th (as CDR 2000) Extra-parliamentary opposition
2004 196,027 1.9
0 / 332
0 / 137
6th Extra-parliamentary opposition
2008
0 / 334
0 / 137
Extra-parliamentary opposition1
2012 1,239,318 16.71 (as ARD)
1 / 412
1 / 176
2nd (as ARD) Opposition
2016
0 / 329
0 / 136
Extra-parliamentary opposition2

1 Did not compete in the 2008 elections
2 Did not compete in the 2016 elections

Presidents of the party[edit]

Notable members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nordsieck, Wolfram, "Romania", Parties and Elections In Europe, retrieved 6 November 2012 
  2. ^ Daniele Caramani (2013). The Europeanization of Politics. Cambridge University Press. p. 310. ISBN 978-1-107-11867-6. 
  3. ^ a b c http://www.2016bec.ro/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/SIAL2016_Situatia_mandatelor_partide-2.xlsx
  4. ^ http://evz.ro/ppe-pntcd-exclus-executie.html
  5. ^ Newsin, Radu Sârbu a fost reales președintele aripii anti-Miluț a PNȚCD. September 26, 2009. Accessed on September 27, 2009
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-06-04. Retrieved 2012-09-08. 
  7. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-08. Retrieved 2014-05-27. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Lavinia Stan, “From Riches to Rags: The Romanian National Christian Democrat Peasant Party,” East European Quarterly, vol. 39, no. 2 (Summer 2005), pp. 179–227.

External links[edit]