OGAE Second Chance Contest

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OGAE Second Chance Contest
Genre Music
Location(s) Various cities
Years active 1987–present
Founded by OGAE
Website
secondchancecontest.com

The OGAE Second Chance Contest is a visual event which was founded in 1987 and is organised by branches of OGAE, the international fan club of the Eurovision Song Contest. Four nations competed in the first contest which took place in 1987.[1] The contest was previously a non-televised event, but evolved over the years by the usage of video tape and nowadays DVD and YouTube.[1]

Each summer following the Eurovision Song Contest, each branch can enter one song that failed to win the country's national selection process for the annual Eurovision Song Contest. The members of each club choose amongst the songs that did not win and select one to represent the club in the event.[2] Votes are cast by members of the OGAE clubs and are returned to the OGAE branch organising the particular year's event.[1] Guest juries have been used to cast votes since 1993.[2]

Background[edit]

The contest began in 1987, when it was then known as "Europe's Favourite". Four OGAE branches competed in the first contest, coming from the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The contest quickly expanded and now contains over 20 countries competing each year. Due to the nature of some countries and national finals it is a common occurrence for countries to sporadically compete in the contest.[3]

Format[edit]

The contest takes place during the summer after the year's Eurovision Song Contest, held in every year. A video entry from each branch of OGAE is handed to each competing OGAE club. The votes are then returned to the organising OGAE branch, normally the previous year's winning branch, who then organises the final. The method of voting has developed since the contests interception, from audio-tape in the contest's beginnings to the use of video tape and nowadays by DVD and YouTube.[1]

Previously it had been known for non-televised national final entries to compete in the Second Chance Contest. This occurred from 1989 to 1991 when OGAE Spain entered songs known to have been entered into the country's internal selection process. In 1990, 1991, 1998 and 1999 OGAE Italy competed in the Second Chance Contest, entering the winning songs of the Italian Sanremo Music Festival, known to be the basis for the creation of the Eurovision Song Contest. After 1999 a new rule was introduced allowing only songs from televised national finals to compete in the Second Chance Contest. This has led some branches ineligible to compete for many years due to no national final being held in the country.[2] In 1993 guest juries have been used in the voting of the contest. These juries are composed of branches that are ineligible to compete in the contest due to no national final being held in their country.[2]

Participation[edit]

Participation in the Second Chance Contest requires competing branches to have had a televised national final held in their country for the year's Eurovision Song Contest. So far 37 countries have been represented at the contest at least once. These are listed here alongside the year in which they made their debut:[4]

Débutantes[edit]

Year Country making its debut entry
1987  Netherlands,  Norway,  Sweden,  United Kingdom
1988  Denmark,  Finland,  Germany,  Greece,  Ireland,  Israel
1989  Spain
1990  Austria,  Cyprus,  Italy,  Portugal
1991  Switzerland,  Yugoslavia
1992  Belgium
1993  Croatia,  Estonia,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Malta,  Romania,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Turkey
1994  Russia
1996  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Macedonia
1999  France
2000  Latvia
2001  Lithuania
2003  Poland
2004  Serbia and Montenegro
2006  Ukraine
2007  Serbia
2009  Andorra,  Moldova, Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the World
2010  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Bulgaria (as Rest of the World)
2014  Albania,  Belarus

OGAE Rest of the World represents countries that do not have an OGAE branch of their own. Their first participation came at the 2009 Contest, where they represented by Slovakia.[4]

The contests[edit]

Retrospective Second Chance Contests[edit]

From 2003 it was decided to hold Retrospective Contests each year containing songs from contests prior to 1987. In 2003 the first contest was held, containing songs that failed to compete in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986. This format is repeated every year, for example in 2004 the 1985 Retrospective contest was held, and in 2005 the 1984 Retro contest was held etc. The latest contests to be held were the 1975 contest in 2014. The next will be the 1974 contest which is scheduled to take place in 2015.[1][2]

Second Chance Contests[edit]

The contests which are organised between members of international Eurovision Song Contest fan club OGAE to select a song which did not make it to the Eurovision Song Contest through their national finals, giving it a "second chance" opportunity to participate in a competition to determine the favourite entry. Participation in the Second Chance Contest requires competing branches to have had a televised national final held in their country for the year's Eurovision Song Contest. So far 37 countries have been represented at the contest at least once. These are listed here alongside the year in which they made their debut:[4] Nine countries have won the contest over contest history. The most successful country in the contest has been OGAE Sweden, who have won the contest fourteen times in total, nearly half of the contests held. The Swedish band, Alcazar, who won in 2003 and again in 2005 is the only artist to win the contest more than once.[5]

1980s[edit]

Arja Saijonmaa winner of the first edition of the OGAE Second Chance Contest in 1987.

Three contests took place in the 1980s, the first being in 1987 which was held in Huizen, the Netherlands, whilst the 1988 and 1989 contest both took place in Östersund, Sweden. The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1987, which was the first edition of the contest, saw four countries; the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom; took part in the first edition of the Second Chance Contests. Each country selected two songs to compete in the contest. this was the first and only time that each country submitted two songs to the contest (much in the same way as the first Eurovision Song Contest in 1956).[6] The first ever winner of the contest was Sweden's Arja Saijonmaa with "Högt över havet", which originally came second in the Swedish national final, Melodifestivalen 1987. Norway's Kjersti Bergesen and Marcha from the Netherlands finished in joint second place.[6]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1988, which was the second edition, saw ten countries participated, with Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, and Israel making their début. Each country submitted one song that failed to win their national selections for the Eurovision Song Contest 1988.[7] The winner was again Sweden, with the song "Om igen" by Lena Philipsson, which came second in the Swedish national selection for Eurovision Melodifestivalen 1988. Second place went to débutante country Finland, while third place went to the Netherlands.[7]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1989, which was the third edition saw nine countries competing in the contest, with Ireland and the Netherlands withdrawing from the contest and Spain making their début. As in 1988, each country had to submit one song that failed to represent them in the Eurovision Song Contest 1989.[8] The winner was Lecia Jønsson from Denmark with the song "Landet Camelot", giving Denmark its first victory in the contest after it came second in the Danish national final Dansk Melodi Grand Prix 1989. Runners-up were Lili & Susie for Sweden while Germany's Andreas Martin came third. Last place went to débutantes Spain, who only received 1 point from Finland.[8]

1990s[edit]

Ten contests took place in the 1990s, held in eight cities located in four countries. Sweden hosted the contests in Östersund in1990 and 1991; Örebro in 1995; and Farsta in 1996. Germany's cities of Montabaur, Hanover, and Hamburg played hosts in 1992, 1997, and 1998 respectively. Oslo, Norway hosted the 1993 and 1994 contest; whilst the Netherlands hosted the 1999 contest in Emmen.

Carola was the winner of the 1990 Second Chance Contest, before going on to win the Eurovision Song Contest the following year.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1990, was the fourth edition, and had fourteen countries competing in the contest. Austria, Cyprus, Italy and Portugal entering the contest for the first time. Ireland and the Netherlands returned after their absences the previous year, while Israel was the only country to withdraw due to an internal selection being made for Eurovision.[9] OGAE Italy selected their winning song of the Italian Sanremo Music Festival.[9] The contest was won once again by Sweden, represented by Carola with the song "Mitt i ett äventyr". Carola would go on to win the Eurovision Song Contest 1991 with "Fångad av en stormvind". Linda Martin, representing Ireland, would also go on to win at Eurovision, winning with "Why Me?" in 1992 Eurovision. Arja Saijonmaa who won for Sweden in the 1987 OGAE Second Chance Contest, returned to represent her native country Finland.[9]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1991, was the fifth edition, seeing fifteen countries compete in the contest[10] Switzerland and Yugoslavia made their débuts, with Yugoslavia making its one and only entry in the contest. Israel returned after their absence the previous year, while Cyprus withdrew due to no national final being held and the Netherlands were unable to compete due to withdrawing from the Eurovision Song Contest 1991. Sweden won the contest once again, for the fourth time, represented by Pernilla Wahlgren with the song "Tvillingsjäl". Greece's Lia Vissi came second, while Israel's Adam came third.[10]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1992 was the sixth edition of the contest. Eleven countries participated in the contest, with Belgium entering the contest for the first time, while Cyprus and the Netherlands returned after their absences the previous year.[11] However Austria, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, the United Kingdom and Yugoslavia all withdrew from the contest. Norway was the winner of the contest this year, represented by Wenche Myhre with "Du skal få din dag i morgen". Israel's Yaron Chadad came second while Ireland's Patricia Roe came third.[11]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1993, was the seventh edition of the contest.[12] Twenty-two countries took part in the contest, with Croatia, Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, Malta, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey making their début. In 1993, a pre-selection contest for the main Eurovision Song Contest called Kvalifikacija za Millstreet was held to limit the number of entries into the main Eurovision final - six of the seven countries competing in this Second Chance Contest, sending either their failed entries from the pre-selection, or sending another song from their national final. Alongside the large number of début countries, there were also a number of other changes in the line-up: Germany could not take part in the contest due to holding an internal selection to select their entry; as well as this Israel and Portugal returned after being absent last year. This year marked the first use of "Guest Juries" in the contest. These juries, coming from non-competing countries, were allowed to vote alongside the competing countries, allowing them to participate to some degree in the contest. The first guest juries came from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg and Spain. The winner of the contest was Merethe Trøan with "Din egen stjerne", representing host country Norway. The Netherlands came second, represented by Ruth Jacott, and the United Kingdom came third with Sonia.[12]

Gladys del Pilar winner of the 1994 Second Chance Contest.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1994 was the eighth edition of the contest. Sixteen countries competed in the contest with Russia entering the contest for the first time. Belgium, Denmark, Israel, Slovenia and Turkey all withdrew from the contest due to being relegated from the 1994 Eurovision Song Contest; Slovakia and Switzerland was also absent from the contest due to no national finals being held in the country for that year's Eurovision.[13] For the second time "Guest Juries" were used in the contest, allowing OGAE branches from countries who held no national final for Eurovision 1994 to compete in Second Chance. Sweden were the winners of the eighth time in the contest history, represented by singer Gladys del Pilar with "Det vackraste jag vet", a song composed by Michael Saxell with lyrics by Ingela Forsman. The runner-up position went to the United Kingdom's Frances Ruffelle, while third place was awarded to host country Norway and Madam Medusa.[13]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1995 was the ninth edition of the contest. Nine countries competed in the contest, with Denmark, Israel, and Slovenia making their return.[14] However a number of countries were forced to withdraw: Estonia, Finland, the Netherlands, and Romania were all forced to miss the contest due to being relegated from the Eurovision Song Contest 1995; Austria, Cyprus, Hungary, Iceland and Russia were also absent from the contest due to no national finals being held in the country for Eurovision. Furthermore Malta did not take part although a national final was being held. Sweden were the winners, represented by singer Cecilia Vennersten with "Det vackraste ", a song composed by Peter & Nanne Grönvall with lyrics by Nanne Grönvall & Maria Rådsten. The runner-up position went to the United Kingdom's Deuce, while third place was awarded to Ireland and Naoimh Penston.[14]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1996 was the tenth contest. Twenty-two countries competed in the contest, with Bosnia and Herzegovina and Macedonia making their début.[15] Several countries returned to the contest too, but none of the participants from the 1995 edition, withdrew. Sweden were the winners of the 10th edition of Second Chance, represented by singer Lotta Engberg with "Juliette och Jonathan". The runner-up position went to the Croatia's Novi Fosili, while third place was awarded to Germany and Leon who did not qualify for the Eurovision Song Contest 1996 as the eventual German entry.[15]

Anna Oxa winner of the 1997 Second Chance Contest.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1997 was the eleventh edition of the contest. Seventeen countries took part in the contest, organised by OGAE Germany.[16] Six countries that took part in the OGAE Second Chance Contest 1996 withdrew for the Contest in 1997: Belgium, Finland, Israel, Macedonia and Romania all withdrew after being relegated from the Eurovision Song Contest 1997, and Russia was forced to withdraw after not holding televised national finals to select their entry for Eurovision 1997. Italy made its return to the contest for the first time since 1991. Italy were crowned the winners of the contest with the song "Storie" by Anna Oxa. This was Italy's first win in Second Chance Contest, and the first win for a non-Scandinavian country. Second place went to Darren Holden of Ireland, while third place went to girl group All About Angels from Germany. During the voting the seventeen competing entries were joined by five guest juries from Austria, France, Israel, Switzerland and Luxembourg.[16]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1998 was the twelfth OGAE Second Chance Contest. Eighteen countries took part in the contest, organised by OGAE Germany in Hamburg, Germany.[17] Four countries that took part in the 1997 edition withdrew from the contest: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark and Hungary all withdrew after being relegated from the Eurovision Song Contest 1998, and Cyprus was forced to withdraw after not holding televised national finals to select their entry for Eurovision 1998. The Netherlands were the winners of the contest with the song "Alsof je bij me bent" by Nurlaila. This was their first win in Second Chance, and the second win for a non-Scandinavian country. Second place went to Nanne Grönvall of Sweden, while third place went to Elisabeth Andreassen from Norway. During the voting the eighteen competing entries were joined by seven guest juries from Denmark, Austria, Cyprus, France, Spain, Luxembourg and Israel.[17]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 1999 was the thirteenth edition of the OGAE Second Chance Contest Seventeen countries were originally going to participate in the contest. However, Malta were disqualified after their votes did not arrive on time.[18] Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus and Denmark all returned after missing the previous year's contest, and France made its Second Chance début. Estonia, Finland, Greece, Macedonia and Switzerland all withdrew from the contest. The winner's were Feryal Başel from Turkey with the song "Unuttuğumu Sandığım Anda". This marked the third year in a row that a non-Scandinavian country had won the contest. Second place went to Belgium's Petra and third place went to Corinna May of Germany, the original German entry for the Eurovision Song Contest 1999. The sixteen competing countries were joined in the voting by guest juries from Spain, Austria, Israel, Finland and Switzerland.[18]

2000s[edit]

Anna Eriksson winner of the OGAE Second Chance Contest 2000.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2000 was the fourteenth OGAE Second Chance Contest, organised by OGAE Turkey after their win in 1999.[18] Twenty-one countries took part in the 2000 contest, held in Istanbul. Latvia who made their début at the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 also followed suit by débuting in the Second Chance Contest, and seven countries made their returns to the contest: Estonia, Finland, Macedonia and Switzerland returned after a year's absence, Romania returned after last taking part in 1996, Iceland for the first time since 1994, and Spain for the first time since 1991. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Portugal and Slovenia were releaged from the 2000 Eurovision, making them ineligible to compete in the Second Chance Contest. Italy also withdrew after three entries were sent from 1997 to 1999. The twnety-one competing countries were joined in the voting by six guest juries from Austria, Israel, Luxembourg, Portugal, Italy and Greece.[19] At the end of the voting Finland's Anna Eriksson was declared the winner with the song "Oot voimani mun", Finland's first (and so far only) victory in the contest. The United Kingdom came second with Catherine Porter and "Crazy", while Spain came third with "Sueño su boca" by Raúl.[19]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2001 was the fifteenth edition of the OGAE Second Chance Contest. It was organised by OGAE Finland after their win the previous year.[19] Twenty countries participated the contest, held in Helsinki in Finland.[20] Lithuania made its début at the OGAE Second Chance Contest this year, and five countries - Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece, Israel, Portugal and Slovenia - returned to the contest after returning from relegation from the Eurovision Song Contest and holding multi-singer national finals. However seven countries withdrew from the contest - Belgium, Cyprus, Finland, Macedonia, Romania and Switzerland were all relegated from the 2001 Eurovision Song Contest, while France held an internal selection for the contest, making them ineligible for Second Chance. This made the host country unable to send an entry to the contest. The twenty competing entries were joined by twelve guest juries in the voting for the winner, coming from the withdrawing countries Macedonia, Finland, France, Cyprus, Belgium and Romania and international juries from Poland, New Zealand, Austria, Russia, Italy and Canada.[21] At the end of the voting the winner was Sweden's Barbados with "Allt som jag ser", beating Spain's Sonia & Selena in second place, and the United Kingdom's Nanne into third place. This was the first male winner in OGAE Second Chance history, and the eighth win for Sweden.[20]

David Bisbal winner of the OGAE Second Chance Contest 2002.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2002 was the sixteenth edition of the contest, and organised by OGAE Sweden following their win in 2001.[20] Eighteen songs competed in the contest, held in Stockholm, Sweden[22] Five countries returned to the contest after missing the previous year - Austria, Belgium, Finland, Macedonia and Romania all returned as competing countries. However five other countries could not compete after being relegated from competing in the Eurovision Song Contest 2002 - Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway and Portugal were all unable to compete. Two further countries, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Lithuania, were disqualified during the voting when their results were not received by the deadline. The eighteen competing entries were joined by seven guest juries in the voting for the winner, coming from France, Luxembourg, Ireland, Portugal, Netherlands, Norway and Turkey.[23] At the end of the voting the winner was Spain's David Bisbal with "Corazon latino", beating Sweden's winner from OGAE Second Chance Contest 2001, Barbados in second place, and Israel's Sarit Hadad into third place.[23]

Nuša Derenda runner-up of the OGAE Second Chance Contest 2003.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2003 was the seventeenth edition of the OGAE Second Chance Contest, and was organised by OGAE Spain following their win the previous year.[22] Twenty countries took part in the contest, held in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria.[24] The competing entries were joined by five guest juries in the voting for the winner, coming from Belgium, Italy, France, Finland and Turkey.[25] After being relegated from the Eurovision Song Contest 2003; Denmark, Finland and Macedonia were unable to compete in the contest. Belgium and Turkey were also forced to withdraw due to not holding a national final for the Eurovision Song Contest 2003. Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway and Portugal returned to the contest after the previous year's relegation. They were joined by Poland, making its début in the Second Chance Contest. Malta were to take part in the contest, and would have been represented by Charlene & Natasha with "Rain of Fire", however the country were disqualified due to voting communication problems. At the end of the voting, two countries had tied for first place - Sweden's Alcazar with "Not a Sinner Nor a Saint", and Slovenia's Nuša Derenda with "Prvič in zadnič", with both having received 215 points. The current tie-break rules of the time were used in this case, with the country having received the most 12 points winning the contest. In this case Sweden had received 13 sets of 12 points, compared to Slovenia's 6 sets, and so the victory went to Alcazar. Had the current tie-break rules been used, with the country receiving points from the most number of countries winning, Sweden still would have won, due to both countries receiving points from 23 countries.[25] The first nul points received in the Second Chance Contest were received during this contest, with both Iceland's Botnleðja and Israel's Lior Narkis receiving no points from the 23 juries.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2004 was the eighteenth edition of the Second Chance Contest, organised once again by OGAE Sweden following their win in 2003.[24] Twenty-one songs competed in the contest, held in Växjö, Sweden.[26] All competing branches of OGAE participated in voting for the winner, along with three guest juries who were ineligible to compete in the contest from France, Ireland and Italy.[27] Serbia and Montenegro made its début, which they also did at the Eurovision Song Contest 2004. Denmark, Finland and Macedonia returned to the contest after being relegated from the Eurovision Song Contest 2003. Belgium and Turkey returned after holding internal selections the previous year, while Malta returned after being disqualified the previous year. A number of countries also withdrew from the contest; Estonia and Israel had been set to compete in the contest, however withdrew at a late stage after selecting their entries (namely "Homme" by Maarja-Liis Ilus and "Freedom" by David D'Or respectively). Iceland withdrew due to no national final being held, while Romania withdrew out of choice. Ireland withdrew, but competed as a guest jury. Spain won the contest, with Sweden and Germany finishing second and third places respectively.[27]

Alcazar winners of the OGAE Second Chance Contests in 2003 and 2005.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2005 was the nineteenth contest held in Bilbao, Spain after Davinia won the 2004 contest with "Mi obsesión".[27] Twenty-four countries competed in the contest for the title of the best song that didn't make it to the Eurovision stage through their national selection, however Estonia were later disqualified as it could not be reached to give their votes for the contest. Two guest juries also voted from Italy and Portugal, giving a total number of twenty-five juries.[28] Belgium, France, Ireland and Russia all returned to the contest after holding national finals to select their entries. Poland and Portugal were forced to withdraw after internal selections were held in their countries. The contest was won by Sweden's Alcazar with "Alcastar", who received 201 points, 24 more than runner-up Serbia and Montenegro. Ireland came last, receiving nul points from all juries.[29]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2006 was the twentieth edition of OGAE Second Chance, and was held in Stockholm, Sweden after Alcazar won the 2005 contest with "Alcastar".[29] Nineteen countries competed in the contest for the title of the best song that didn't make it to the Eurovision stage through their national selection. Six guest juries also competed in the voting from Italy, Andorra, France, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Spain and from the Rest of the World.[30] Ukraine entered the contest for the first time, while Poland and Portugal returned after their absence the previous year, all holding national finals to select their entries to the Eurovision Song Contest 2006. However a large number of countries failed to hold national finals or simply withdrew from the contest. Austria withdrew from the 2006 Eurovision Song Contest, and were thus ineligible to compete in Second Chance. Bosnia and Herzegovina, France, Spain and Turkey failed to hold multi-song national selections for Eurovision, while Estonia and Latvia withdrew from Second Chance out of choice.[30] The contest was won by Slovenia's Saša Lendero with "Mandoline", who received 220 points, 45 points more than runner-up Norway. Poland received nul points from all juries, placing last.[31]

Sanna Nielsen, the winner of the 2008 Second Chance Contest, representing Sweden.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2007 was the twenty-first contest, which were held in Ljubljana, Slovenia after their win at the 2006 contest.[31] Twenty countries competed in the contest for the title of the best song that didn't make it to the Eurovision stage through their national selection. However 22 had signed up to compete. Moldova were forced to withdraw their entry, "Your Place or Mine" by Olia Tira, after no national final performance could be available. Finland were disqualified after the country's branch was expelled from the OGAE Network on 17 September 2007, and as such their entry, "Olet uneni kaunein" by Johanna Kurkela, did not participate in the contest. Seven guest juries also competed in the voting, namely Italy, Andorra, Rest of the World, Austria, Belgium, Lebanon and Moldova (after their withdrawal).[32] Estonia, France and Spain made their returns to the contest after missing last year's contest. Belgium withdrew after no national final was held in the country while Serbia and Montenegro were forced to withdraw after the country was dissolved in 2006. Its successor, Serbia, however made its début to the contest this year. The contest was won by Sweden's Måns Zelmerlöw with "Cara Mia", who received 252 points from the 27 juries, 72 points more than runner-up United Kingdom.[33]

Hera Björk is from Iceland, however, she won the 2009 Second Chance Contest for Denmark.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2008 was the twenty-second OGAE Second Chance Contest, organised between members of international Eurovision Song Contest fan club OGAE to select the best song not to make it to the Eurovision Song Contest through their national finals. Twenty-one songs competed for the title in the 21st edition of the contest, held in Stockholm in Sweden after OGAE Sweden's win the previous year with Måns Zelmerlöw and "Cara Mia".[34] All twenty-one competing countries voted for the winner, and were also joined by eight guest juries from countries ineligible to participate in the contest - these guest juries came from OGSE branches in Andorra, Austria, France, Italy, Lebanon, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Kazakhstan (representing the Rest of the World).[35] Belgium, Finland, Lithuania and Russia made their returns to the contest, all holding national finals in their countries. The Netherlands withdrew after an internal selection was held in the country, while Ukraine withdrew of choice. The contest was won by Sweden's Sanna Nielsen with "Empty Room", who received 268 points, 90 points more than runner-up Spain. Nielsen went on to represent Sweden at the Eurovision Song Contest 2014, with the song "Undo". This was Sweden's 12th win in the contest, remaining the most successful country in the contest. Estonia came last, gaining nul points from all juries.[36]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2009 was the twenty-third OGAE Second Chance Contest, organised between members of international Eurovision Song Contest fan club OGAE to select the best song not to make it to the Eurovision Song Contest through their national finals. The contest was held in Stockholm, Sweden after Sanna Nielsen won the for Sweden the previous year.[36] Twenty countries participated in the contest, with songs that failed to win their televised national selections. Malta was to originally compete with "Avalon" by Georgina & Ruth Casingena, however OGAE Malta has since decided to withdraw. Andorra and Moldova entered the contest for the first time, while the Netherlands returned after their absence from the 2008 contest. Slovakia returned after a 14 year absence, last entering in 1993 contest. The Slovak song was also representing OGAE Rest of the World, representing countries with no national OGAE branch.[37] The United Kingdom, Belgium and Germany left the contest due to not holding a multi-song national final for the 2009, but voted as guest juries, along with Austria, France, Italy and Turkey.[38] Russia were also absent from the contest. Luxembourg withdrew from being a Guest Jury on 2 September 2009. The draw for the running order was conducted on 19 June 2009 in Gävle, where it was decided that newcomer Andorra would start the show, while Portugal would close it.[38] The contest was won by Denmark's Hera Björk with "Someday", who received 257 points, 28 points more than runner-up Sweden. This was Denmark's second win in the contest. Slovakia placed last, receiving 4 points. The full result of the Second Chance Contest were presented on 22 December 2009 through a PDF file sent to the competing OGAE clubs. The voting show on DVD will be released during early 2010.[39]

2010s[edit]

Yohanna won the 2011 Second Chance Contest for Iceland.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2010 was the twenty-fourth contest, which were held in Copenhagen, Denmark after Hera Björk won the previous year.[38] Twenty-three countries took part in the contest; Armenia, Azerbaijan and Bulgaria (as the entry for OGAE Rest of the World) took part for the first time, with Germany, Malta and Russia, all returning after missing last year's contest, and Cyprus, for the first time since 2000, competing as well. However, Andorra, Estonia, Moldova, the Netherlands and Slovakia withdrew from the contest.[40] The results of OGAE Second Chance Contest 2010 were announced by OGAE Denmark on 31 October 2010 at 3pm CET over a live Internet stream. Sweden's Timoteij were the winners of the contest with "Kom", giving Sweden their 13th win in the contest. 2nd place went to Denmark's Bryan Rice and 3rd place went to Portugal's Catarina Pereira. Azerbaijan came last with 0 points.[40]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2011 was the twenty-fifth contest, which were held in Gothenburg, Sweden after their in 2010.[40] Twenty-one countries competed in the contest, with five countries making their return to the contest: Austria, Belgium, Iceland (as the entry for OGAE Rest of the World), Italy and the Netherlands all sent entries for the first time since 2005, 2008, 2001, 1999 and 2009 respectively. However Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Russia and Serbia withdrew. Andorra, France and the United Kingdom took part as guest juries during the voting. On 10 October 2011 OGAE Sweden announced the results of the 2011 Second Chance Contest: Iceland's Yohanna, representing OGAE Rest of the World was announced as the winner - their first win in the contest. Sweden's Jenny Silver came second, while Modà feat. Emma came in 3rd for Italy. Macedonia came in last with 0 points.[41]

Pastora Soler won the 2012 Second Chance Contest for Spain.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2012 was the twenty-sixth held in Johannesburg, South Africa after Yohanna won the for Iceland, represented by OGAE Rest of the World with "Nótt", in 2011.[41] Nineteen countries competed in the contest. It also marked the return of four countries to the contest: Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia (as the entry for OGAE Rest of the World) and Russia. However Croatia, Italy, Israel, Malta, Macedonia and Poland did not participate in the Second Chance Contest.[42] Italy, Israel and Poland, along with Andorra, France, Luxembourg and the United Kingdom were lined up to be guest juries during the voting. The voting took place over five days from 16 October 2013. Spain's Pastora Soler was declared the winner with the song "Tu vida es tu vida", beating Sweden's Danny Saucedo into 2nd place by a single point. Norway's Reidun Sæther took 3rd place.[43]

Helena Paparizou winner of the 2014 Second Chance Contest for Sweden.

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2013 were the twenty-seventh held on 5 October 2013 in Barcelona, Spain after Pastora Soler won the previous year.[42] Fifteen countries competed in the contest. Israel, Italy, Serbia, and Hungary (as part of OGAE Rest of the World) returned to the competition. While Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, the Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, and Slovenia withdrew. Norway won the contest with the song "Bombo", performed by Adelén, achieving 151 points after all the votes were cast. Italy finished second, while Hungary (as part of OGAE Rest of the World) finished in third place.[44]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2014 was the twenty-eighth edition of the Second Chance Contest, held in Oslo, Norway on 19 October 2014 following their win in the 2013 contest.[44] Twenty countries participated in the contest, with Albania and Belarus making their Second Chance début.[45] Denmark, France, Malta, Portugal, Romania, and Slovenia all returned. Austria and Italy who took part in the 2013 Contest weren't able to take part in 2014 because they had selected their Eurovision entries internally. Serbia were also absent from the contest due to their withdrawal from the Eurovision Song Contest 2014.[45] The contest was won by Helena Paparizou, who represented Sweden with the song "Survivor", beating Spain into second place, and Portugal into third.[46] Paparizou previously represented Greece at the Eurovision Song Contest 2005 with the song "My Number One" which went on to win the contest.[47]

The OGAE Second Chance Contest 2015 will be the twenty-ninth edition of the contest, and is scheduled to take place in Sweden, following their win in 2014.[45] Details regarding the number of participating countries and their entries will not be known until shortly after the Eurovision Song Contest 2015.

Winners[edit]

By contest[edit]

Retrospective Second Chance Contest[edit]

Year Host city Participants Winner Performer Song Points Runner-up Third place
1974 TBD
1975 United Kingdom Brighton 11  Germany Marianne Rosenberg "Er gehört zu mir" 264  Sweden  Portugal
1976 14  Luxembourg Marianne Rosenberg "Tout peut arriver au cinéma" 212  United Kingdom  France
1977 10  France Patricia Lavila "Vis ta vie" 275  United Kingdom  Belgium
1978 14  United Kingdom Ronnie France "Lonely Nights" 226  Israel  Denmark
1979 13  Germany Paola "Vogel der Nacht" 188  Greece  Israel
1980 12  United Kingdom Maggie Moone "Happy Everything" 289  Germany  France
1981 16  United Kingdom Liquid Gold "Don't Panic" 248  Sweden  Netherlands
1982 15  Netherlands The Millionaires "Fantasie eiland" 204  United Kingdom  Germany
1983 15  Germany Ingrid Peters and July Paul "Viva La Mamma" 204  Denmark  Israel
1984 15  Belgium Formule II "Merci à la vie" 160  Sweden  Denmark
1985 12  Denmark Trax "Ved du hva' du sku'" 170  United Kingdom  Israel
1986 United Kingdom London 13  Netherlands DeeDee "Fata Morgana" 123  Iceland  Denmark

Second Chance Contest[edit]

Year Host city Participants Winner Performer Song Points Runner-up Third place
1987 Netherlands Huizen 8  Sweden Arja Saijonmaa "Högt över havet" 24  Netherlands
 Norway
No third place awarded
1988 Sweden Östersund 10  Sweden Lena Philipsson "Om igen" 63  Finland  Netherlands
1989 9  Denmark Lecia Jønsson "Landet Camelot" 72  Sweden  Germany
1990 13  Sweden Carola "Mitt i ett äventyr" 119  Italy  Germany
1991 15  Sweden Pernilla Wahlgren "Tvillingsjäl" 106  Greece  Israel
1992 Germany Montabaur 11  Norway Wenche Myhre "Du skal få din dag i morgen" 78  Israel  Ireland
1993 Norway Oslo 22  Norway Merethe Trøan "Din egen stjerne" 188  Netherlands  United Kingdom
1994 16  Sweden Gladys Del Pilar "Det vackraste jag vet" 176  United Kingdom  Norway
1995 Sweden Örebro 9  Sweden Cecilia Vennersten "Det vackraste" 129  United Kingdom  Ireland
1996 Sweden Farsta 22  Sweden Lotta Engberg "Juliette & Jonathan" 152  Croatia  Germany
1997 Germany Hanover 17  Italy Anna Oxa "Storie" 165  Ireland  Germany
1998 Germany Hamburg 18  Netherlands Nurlaila "Alsof je bij me bent" 192  Sweden  Norway
1999 Netherlands Emmen 16  Turkey Feryal Başel "Unuttuğumu Sandığım Anda" 164  Belgium  Germany
2000 Turkey Istanbul 21  Finland Anna Eriksson "Oot voimani mun" 177  United Kingdom  Spain
2001 Finland Helsinki 20  Sweden Barbados "Allt som jag ser" 252  Spain  United Kingdom
2002 Sweden Stockholm 18  Spain David Bisbal "Corazón latino" 203  Sweden  Israel
2003 Spain Las Palmas 19  Sweden Alcazar "Not a Sinner Nor a Saint" 215  Slovenia  Austria
2004 Sweden Växjö 21  Spain Davinia "Mi obsesión" 192  Sweden  Germany
2005 Spain Bilbao 23  Sweden Alcazar "Alcastar" 201  Serbia and Montenegro  Slovenia
2006 Sweden Stockholm 19  Slovenia Saša Lendero "Mandoline" 201  Norway  Sweden
2007 Slovenia Ljubljana 20  Sweden Måns Zelmerlöw "Cara Mia" 252  United Kingdom  Spain
2008 Sweden Stockholm 21  Sweden Sanna Nielsen "Empty Room" 268  Spain  Poland
2009 20  Denmark Hera Björk "Someday" 257  Sweden  Spain
2010 Denmark Copenhagen 22  Sweden Timoteij "Kom" 267  Denmark  Portugal
2011 Sweden Gothenburg 21  Iceland[RoW] Yohanna "Nótt" 224  Sweden  Italy
2012 South Africa Johannesburg 19  Spain Pastora Soler "Tu vida es tu vida" 201  Sweden  Norway
2013 Spain Barcelona 15  Norway Adelén "Bombo" 151  Italy  Hungary[RoW]
2014 Norway Oslo 20  Sweden Helena Paparizou "Survivor" 259  Spain  Portugal
2015 Sweden TBA

By country[edit]

Wins[5] Country Years
14  Sweden 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014
3  United Kingdom 1978[R], 1980[R], 1981[R]
 Netherlands 1982[R], 1986[R], 1998
 Denmark 1985[R], 1989, 2009
 Spain 2002, 2004, 2012
 Norway 1992, 1993, 2013
2  Germany 1979[R], 1983[R]
1  Luxembourg 1976[R]
 France 1977[R]
 Belgium 1984[R]
 Italy 1997
 Turkey 1999
 Finland 2000
 Slovenia 2006
Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the World 2011

By language[edit]

Wins[5] Language Years Countries
10 English 1978[R], 1980[R], 1981[R], 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2014 United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, Norway
9 Swedish 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2001, 2010 Sweden
4 Spanish 2002, 2004, 2012, 2013 Spain, Norway
3 Dutch 1982[R], 1986[R], 1998 Netherlands
2 French 1977[R], 1984[R] France, Belgium
German 1979[R], 1983[R] Germany
Danish 1985[R], 1989 Denmark
Norwegian 1992, 1993 Norway
1 Italian 1997 Italy
Turkish 1999 Turkey
Finnish 2000 Finland
Slovene 2006 Slovenia
Icelandic 2011 Rest of the World (Iceland)

Guest Jury Hits[edit]

The Guest Jury Hits contest was introduced in 2003, giving guest juries of the Retro contests the opportunity to compete in their own contest. The contest was formed as a way for OGAE branches to become juries in the Second Chance Retro Contest, with each non-competing branch selecting a hit song from their country in that year. The first contest was held in 2003, when hit songs from 1986 competed in the contest. So far eleven contests have been held, with Italy winning six contests, and Belgium, Spain, Sweden, Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, and the United States all winning once. Umberto Tozzi has so far been responsible for three of Italy's wins.[48]

Year Winner[5] Song Performer Runner-up
1975 Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the World
 United States
"Only Yesterday" The Carpenters  Ireland
1976  Sweden "Fernando" Anni-Frid Lyngstad Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the World
 United States
1977  Italy "Ti amo" Umberto Tozzi  Austria
1978  Spain "Vivir asi es morir de amor" Camilo Sesto  Italy
1979  Italy "Gloria" Umberto Tozzi Flag of Earth.svg Rest of the World
 United States
1980  Italy "Stella stai" Umberto Tozzi  Cyprus
1981  Italy "Sarà perché ti amo" Ricchi e Poveri  Spain
1982  Italy "Storie di tutti o giorni" Riccardo Fogli  France
1983  Italy "Sarà quel che sarà" Tiziana Rivale  Ukrainian SSR
1984  Ukrainian SSR "Oy zelene zhito zelene" Oksana Bilozir  Greece
1985  Belgium "Vergeet Barbara" Will Tura  SR Serbia

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Indicates representative of OGAE Rest of the World.
  2. ^ Indicates winners of the Retrospective Second Chance Contest.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Speirs, Gary. "Contest Background". OGAE Second Chance Contest. sechuk.com. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Speirs, Gary. "Statistics and other Useless Information". OGAE Second Chance Contest. sechuk.com. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "About us". OGAE Second Chance Contest. OGAE. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c Speirs, Gary. "All nations, all positions". OGAE Second Chance Contest. sechuk.com. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest". All the winners. sechuk.com. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1987". sechuk.com. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1988". sechuk.com. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1989". sechuk.com. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1990". 
  10. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1991". 
  11. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1992". 
  12. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1993". 
  13. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1994". 
  14. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1995". 
  15. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1996". 
  16. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1997". 
  17. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1998". 
  18. ^ a b c Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 1999". 
  19. ^ a b c Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2000 - Voting". 
  20. ^ a b c Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2001". 
  21. ^ Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2001 - Voting". 
  22. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2002". 
  23. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2002 - Voting". 
  24. ^ a b Speirs, Gary. "OGAE Secong Chance Contest 2003". 
  25. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2003 - Voting". 
  26. ^ "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2004". 
  27. ^ a b c "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2004 - Voting". 
  28. ^ "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2005". 
  29. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2005 - Voting". 
  30. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2006". Sechuk.com. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  31. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2006 - Voting". 
  32. ^ "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2007". 
  33. ^ "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2007 - Results". 
  34. ^ "Come to Sweden". 
  35. ^ Floras, Stella (8 June 2008). "OGAE Second chance contest running order". esctoday.com. ESCToday. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  36. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2008 - Voting". 
  37. ^ Repo, Juha (25 July 2009). "OGAE Second Chance contest has started". ESCToday. Archived from the original on 26 July 2009. Retrieved 25 July 2009. 
  38. ^ a b c "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2009". Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  39. ^ Dufaut, Dominique (22 December 2009). "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2009: Here are the results!". esctoday.com. ESCToday. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  40. ^ a b c "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2010". 
  41. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2011". 
  42. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2012". 
  43. ^ "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2012 - Voting". sechuk.com. Retrieved 13 October 2012. 
  44. ^ a b "OGAE Second Chance Contest 2013". 
  45. ^ a b c "OGAE SECOND CHANCE 2014 - NORWAY". Retrieved 18 May 2014. 
  46. ^ "The results of the OGAE Second Chance Contest 2014!". sechuk.com. Sechuk.com. 19 October 2014. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  47. ^ Sietse Bakker (22 May 2005). "Greece wins Eurovision Song Contest". esctoday.com. ESCToday. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  48. ^ Speirs, Gary. "Guest Jury Hits". OGAE Guest Jury Contest. sechuk.com. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 

External links[edit]