List of tunnels in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The following is a list of some tunnels in the United States of America. More tunnels may be found in each state than are included on this list.

Alabama[edit]

Alaska[edit]

Arizona[edit]

Arkansas[edit]

California[edit]

Robin Williams Tunnel, southern portal

Colorado[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

District of Columbia[edit]

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Hawaii[edit]

Idaho[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Indiana[edit]

Iowa[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Leatherwood Tunnel, divided road tunnel, at Leatherwood in Perry County Ky. on Ky Rte 699

Louisiana[edit]

Maryland[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Silver Creek Cliff Tunnel, Lake County, Minnesota


Missouri[edit]

Montana[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

Nevada[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

New York[edit]

New York City Subway tunnels:

Other tunnels in New York City:

The Holland Tunnel was the first underwater tunnel designed for automobiles.

Other tunnels in New York State:

North Carolina[edit]

Ohio[edit]

  • Lytle Tunnel, tri freeway tunnels, I-71 under Lytle Park, downtown Cincinnati, 1,099 feet (335 m); the tri tunnels are side-by-side, from west to east:
    • a two-lane I-71 southbound tunnel
    • a one lane southbound tunnel for the I-71 exit ramp to Downtown/Riverfront/Third Street
    • a three-lane I-71 northbound tunnel

Oklahoma[edit]

  • Jenson Railroad Tunnel, located in LeFlore County (just southwest of Bonanza, Arkansas), is the first and only railroad tunnel in Oklahoma. It was built through Backbone Mountain during the mid 1880s in Indian Territory by the Fort Smith & Southern Railway. It is still in operation today, primarily used by the Kansas City Southern Railroad. [22]

Oregon[edit]

name location type length (ft) opened notes ref
Arch Cape Tunnel US 101, 8 mi (13 km). south of Cannon Beach automobile 1,228.1 1937 goes through Arch Cape [23] [24]
Cape Creek Tunnel Lane County on US 101 automobile 714 1931? refs disagree over year and length 1,228.1' vs. 714' [25] [26]
Cornelius Pass Tunnel Portland railway
abandoned
4,100(?) March 21, 1911 now owned by State of Oregon, but maintained by PWRR; closed by fire September 1994 – July 1998 [27] [28] [29] [30]
Cornell Tunnel No. 1 Portland automobile 497.1 1940 NW Cornell Road [31] [32]
Cornell Tunnel No. 2 Portland automobile 247.1 1941 NW Cornell Road [33] [34]
Dennis L. Edwards Tunnel Sunset Highway southwest of Vernonia automobile 772 1940 formerly called "Sunset Tunnel" [35] [36] [37] [38]
Elk Creek Tunnel Douglas County on OR 38 automobile 1,080.1 1938? refs disagree over year [39] [40]
Elk Rock Tunnel Clackamas County under OR 43 rail 1,396 1921 single track S-shaped route [41][42]
Knowles Creek Tunnel Lane County on OR 126 automobile 1,430.2 1958 [43] [44]
Mitchell Point Tunnel Columbia River Gorge west of Hood River automobile, 2 lane 385 1915 closed in 1954, demolished in 1966, part of Historic Columbia River Highway [45]
Mosier Twin Tunnels Columbia River Gorge east of Mosier (near The Dalles) automobile, 2 lane 350 (combined) 1921 part of Historic Columbia River Highway [46]
Oneonta Tunnel Columbia River Gorge near Multnomah Falls automobile, 2 lane 125 1914 part of Historic Columbia River Highway [47]
Robertson Tunnel Portland light commuter rail
twin tunnels
16,368 1998 MAX Light Rail
Rocky Butte Tunnel NE Rocky Butte Rd.
Portland
automobile 370.0? 1939 through Rocky Butte; refs disagree over length [48] [49]
Salt Creek Tunnel Lane County on OR 58 automobile 904.9 1939 [50] [51]
Tooth Rock Tunnel I-84 near Cascade Locks State Park automobile
interstate
827.1? 1936 where Historic Columbia River Highway goes through Tooth Rock; refs disagree over length [52] [53]
Vista Ridge Tunnels Sunset Highway/US 26, Portland automobile
twin tunnels
1,001.0 1969 3 lanes each direction, 6% grade, curved [54]
Walcott Tunnel Washington County at 45°42′25″N 123°15′44″W / 45.70694°N 123.26222°W / 45.70694; -123.26222 railroad [55]
West Burnside Tunnel Portland automobile 230.0 1940 W Burnside Road [56] [57]
West Side CSO Tunnel Portland sewer 18,000 2006 Waterfront Park [43]
  • Many unnamed, numbered railroad tunnels exist within Oregon.

Pennsylvania[edit]

Puerto Rico[edit]

Rhode Island[edit]

South Carolina[edit]


Tennessee[edit]

Texas[edit]

Utah[edit]

Vermont[edit]

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

West Virginia[edit]


Wyoming[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "5th Avenue North Tunnel". Emporis. Retrieved October 23, 2012. 
  2. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Bankhead Tunnel
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Blount Tunnel
  4. ^ "Brocks Gap". Birmingham Rails. Retrieved October 23, 2012. 
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Cooks Springs Tunnel
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Coosa Tunnel
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Hardwick Tunnel
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Hayden Tunnel
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Jefferson Tunnel
  10. ^ "Laney Tunnel" (PDF). =Quikrete. Retrieved October 23, 2012. 
  11. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Oak Mountain Tunnel
  12. ^ "Modal Testing of the Palisade Tunnel" (PDF). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. University of Alabama at Birmingham. Retrieved October 23, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Tunnel Board Pondering Two Routes Under Red Mountain". Birmingham News. February 1947. Retrieved October 26, 2012. 
  14. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Roper Tunnel
  15. ^ "Tunnel Springs Namesake Requires Sense of Direction to Search It Out". Press-Register. April 28, 2008. Retrieved October 26, 2012. 
  16. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: George C. Wallace Tunnel
  17. ^ "Governor Schwarzenegger Announces the Early Reopening of I-5 at Newhall Pass". California Office of the Governor. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  18. ^ "Watkins "New Series" Stereoview Titles". Carletonwatkins.org. 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  19. ^ 769 - From West Portal Tunnel 26 to Simi Valley Station on YouTube
  20. ^ Van Nostrand's Eclectic Engineering Magazine (1870). "Tunnels of the Pacific Railroad". Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  21. ^ "Livermore History - Railroads 1". eLivermore.com. 2003. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  22. ^ "Saint Paul Pass Tunnel". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 
  23. ^ [1]
  24. ^ [2]
  25. ^ [3]
  26. ^ [4]
  27. ^ [5]
  28. ^ [6]
  29. ^ Harmon Tunnel on Bridgehunter.com
  30. ^ Pammel Park operated by Madison County Conservation Board
  31. ^ "Better Late than Never". The Holland Sentinel. December 15, 2004. 
  32. ^ "Google Map of Tunnel Location". Retrieved June 10, 2015. 
  33. ^ "Bridgehunter Index of Tunnel". Retrieved June 10, 2015. 
  34. ^ [7]
  35. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-02-28. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  36. ^ "US 82 Tunnel, Otero County, New Mexico". Retrieved 4 October 2012. 
  37. ^ [8]
  38. ^ [9]
  39. ^ [10]
  40. ^ [11]
  41. ^ Haywood County North Carolina (Map) (2009 ed.). Cartography by North Carolina Public Works Commission. North Carolina Department of Transportation. 2009. 
  42. ^ "Virtual Blue Ridge: Tunnels". Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  43. ^ "The West Side Big Pipe Project". Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  44. ^ "DART completes tunnels ahead of schedule". Retrieved December 12, 2016. 
  45. ^ [12]
  46. ^ Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) No. WV-80, "Hempfield Viaduct & Tunnel No. 1, Spanning Wheeling Creek at B&O Railroad tracks near I-70, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV", 5 photos, 1 photo caption page
  47. ^ [13]