United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2014

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United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2014

← 2012 November 4, 2014 (2014-11-04) 2016 →

All 27 New York seats to the United States House of Representatives

  Majority party Minority party
  Nancy Pelosi 113th Congress 2013.jpg John Boehner 113th Congress 2013.jpg
Leader Nancy Pelosi John Boehner
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 21 6
Seats won 18 9
Seat change Decrease 3 Increase 3
Popular vote 2,009,444 1,554,274
Percentage 51.07% 39.50%
Swing Decrease 6.93% Increase 7.85%

United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2014 results by district.svg
Popular vote by congressional district. As this is a first-past-the-post election, seat totals are not determined by total popular vote in the state, but instead by results in each congressional district.

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the 27 U.S. Representatives from the state of New York, one from each of the state's 27 congressional districts. The elections coincided with other elections to the United States Senate and House of Representatives and various state and local elections, including the Governor of New York, Attorney General of New York, and Comptroller of New York.

Contents

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2014[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 2,009,444 51.07% 18 -3
Republican 1,554,274 39.50% 9 +3
Conservative 37,622 0.96% 0
Green 34,580 0.88% 0
Others 298,785 7.59% 0
Totals 3,934,705 100.00% 27

Districts[edit]

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is located in eastern Long Island and includes most of central and eastern Suffolk County. The incumbent was Democrat Tim Bishop, who had represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected with 52% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+2.

Bishop ran for re-election and received the Democratic, Independence, and Working Families nominations.[2] County Republican committees designated State Senator Lee Zeldin, who was the nominee for the seat in 2008, as their nominee. On June 24, 2014, Zeldin defeated former prosecutor George Demos who had challenged him in a Primary.[3][4][5][6]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lee Zeldin 10,283 61.34
Republican George Demos 6,482 38.66
Total votes 16,765 100

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Tim
Bishop (D)
Lee
Zeldin (R)
Other Undecided
Siena College October 26–29, 2014 670 ± 3.8% 45% 50% 5%
Public Opinion Strategies September 23–25, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 46% 46% 8%
Harper Polling September 21–22, 2014 568 ± 4.1% 44% 44% 12%
Siena College September 7–11, 2014 592 ± 4% 51% 41% 8%
External Links
Results[edit]
US House Election, 2014: New York District 1[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lee Zeldin 77,062 43.61
Conservative (N.Y.) Lee Zeldin 16,973 9.60
Total Lee Zeldin 94,035 53.21
Democratic Tim Bishop 68,387 38.70
Working Families Tim Bishop 5,457 3.09
Independence Tim Bishop 4,878 2.76
Total Tim Bishop (Incumbent) 78,722 44.55
None Blank/Void/Write-In 3,962 2.24
Total votes 176,719 100

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is based along the South Shore of Long Island and includes southwestern Suffolk County and a small portion of southeastern Nassau County. The incumbent was Republican Peter T. King, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 3rd district from 1993 to 2013. He was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+1.

Democrats would like to pick up this seat, but King has consistently performed well, despite the district's swing nature. He has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2] Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice was a potential Democratic candidate, but chose to run in the neighboring 4th district instead.[9] Civic Association President and former health-care executive Patricia Maher has received the Democratic nomination. She ran her last race winning the Democratic Primary by 60% of the vote against a very well funded former Nassau County Supreme Court Justice. William D. Stevenson has received the Green nomination.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 2[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter T. King 76,659 52.29
Conservative (N.Y.) Peter T. King 13,789 9.40
Independence Peter T. King 4,729 3.23
Total Peter T. King (Incumbent) 95,177 64.92
Democratic Patricia Maher 41,814 28.52
Green William D. Stevenson 2,281 1.56
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,345 5.01
Total votes 146,617 100

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district includes most of the North Shore of Long Island. It expands from northwestern Suffolk County, across northern Nassau County, and into far northeastern Queens. The incumbent is Democrat Steve Israel, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 2nd district from 2001 to 2013. He was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2012 and the district has an even PVI.

Like King in the neighboring 2nd district, Israel has consistently performed well, despite his district's swing nature. He has received the Democratic, Independence and Working Families nominations.[2] Attorney Grant Lally, who was the nominee for the 5th district in 1994 and 1996, has received the Republican and Conservative nominations.[10]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Grant M. Lally 3,439 50.08
Republican Stephen A. Labate 3,428 49.92
Total votes 6,867 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 3[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Israel 80,393 46.97
Working Families Steve Israel 5,191 3.03
Independence Steve Israel 4,448 2.60
Total Steve Israel (Incumbent) 90,032 52.60
Republican Grant M. Lally 63,219 36.93
Conservative (N.Y.) Grant M. Lally 11,050 6.46
Total Grant M. Lally 74,269 43.39
None Blank/Void/Write-In 6,862 4.01
Total votes 171,163 100

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in central and southern Nassau County. The incumbent is Democrat Carolyn McCarthy, who has represented the district since 1997. She was re-elected with 62% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+3.

Democratic primary[edit]

McCarthy announced that she would not seek re-election on January 8, 2014, due to complications from lung cancer.[11] Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice has the endorsement of McCarthy and has also received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations.[2][12][13]

Results[edit]
Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathleen M. Rice 7,770 57.30
Democratic Kevan M. Abrahams 5,791 42.70
Total votes 13,561 100

Republican primary[edit]

Attorney Frank Scaturro, who lost the Republican primary for the seat in 2010 and 2012 and was the Conservative Party nominee in 2012, received the Conservative Party nomination, but dropped out of the race. Former Nassau County Legislative Majority Leader and Presiding Officer Bruce Blakeman, who was the Republican nominee for New York State Comptroller in 1998 and the Tax Revolt Party nominee for the U.S. Senate in 2010, has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[14] Republican Nassau Legislator and nominee for the seat in 2010 and 2012 Fran Becker and Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray considered a bid, but didn't run.[15][16]

Results[edit]
Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bruce A. Blakeman 9,083 65.96
Republican Frank J. Scaturro 4,687 34.04
Total votes 13,770 100

Conservative primary[edit]

Conservative Party of New York State primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative (N.Y.) Bruce A. Blakeman 664 66.60
Conservative (N.Y.) Opportunity To Ballot 333 33.40
Total votes 997 100

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Kathleen
Rice (D)
Bruce
Blakeman (R)
Other Undecided
Siena College October 16–20, 2014 628 ± 3.9% 52% 42% 6%
Siena College College September 10–15, 2014 596 ± 4% 55% 37% 8%
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 4[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathleen M. Rice 83,772 47.79
Working Families Kathleen M. Rice 6,021 3.43
Total Kathleen Rice 89,793 51.22
Republican Bruce A. Blakeman 67,811 38.68
Conservative (N.Y.) Bruce A. Blakeman 9,879 5.64
Independence Bruce A. Blakeman 2,437 1.39
Total Bruce A. Blakeman 80,127 45.71
None Blank/Void/Write-In 5,385 3.07
Total votes 175,305 100

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is mostly located entirely within Queens in New York City, but also includes a small portion of Nassau County. The incumbent is Democrat Gregory Meeks, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 6th district from 1998 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 90% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+35.

Joseph Marthone, who ran against Meeks in the primary in 2012, ran against Meeks again, but lost to Meeks in the primary, making Meeks unopposed for re-election. No other candidate filed to run.[2] Meeks has also received the Working Families Party nomination.

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory W. Meeks 8,119 80.05
Democratic Joseph R. Marthone 2,023 19.95
Total votes 10,142 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 5[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory W. Meeks (Incumbent) 75,712 80.20
Allen 4 Congress Allen F. Steinhardt 3,870 4.10
None Blank/Void/Write-In 14,818 15.70
Total votes 94,400 100

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located entirely within Queens in New York City. The incumbent is Democrat Grace Meng, who has represented the district since 2013. She was elected in 2012, winning the Democratic primary with 53% of the vote and the general election with 68% of the vote. The district has a PVI of D+13.

John Liu, the former New York City Comptroller and a candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2013, had considered challenging Meng in the primary.[17] However, he decided against it (instead opting to run for New York State Senate) and endorsed her for re-election.[18] She has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations and is unopposed for re-election.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 6[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Grace Meng 49,227 63.68
Working Families Grace Meng 6,141 7.94
Total Grace Meng (Incumbent) 55,368 71.62
None Blank/Void/Write-In 21,938 28.38
Total votes 77,306 100

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is located entirely in New York City and includes parts of Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. The incumbent is Democrat Nydia Velázquez, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 12th district from 1993 to 2013. She was re-elected in 2012 with 95% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+34.

Velázquez has received the nomination of the Working Families Party and Attorney Jeff Kurzon is challenging her in the Democratic primary.[2][19] John Liu, the former New York City Comptroller and a candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2013, also considered challenging Velázquez in the primary;[17] but he decided not to run. Allan E. Romaguera has received the Conservative nomination and Jose Luis Fernandez has received the Republican nomination.[2]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nydia M. Valezquez 7,627 80.94
Democratic Jeffrey M. Kurzon 1,796 19.06
Total votes 9,423 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 7[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nydia Velazquez 47,142 68.80
Working Families Nydia Velazquez 9,451 13.79
Total Nydia Velazquez (Incumbent) 56,593 82.59
Republican Jose Luis Fernandez 5,713 8.34
Conservative (N.Y.) Allan E. Romaguera 1,398 2.04
None Blank/Void/Write-In 4,818 7.03
Total votes 68,522 100

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is located entirely in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. The incumbent is Democrat Hakeem Jeffries, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, winning the Democratic primary with 71% of the vote and the general election with 90% of the vote, succeeding retiring Democrat Edolphus Towns. The district has a PVI of D+35.

Jeffries has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations. Businessman Alan Bellone, a Republican nominee for the State Assembly in 2008 and 2010 and a candidate for the district in 2012, has received the Republican nomination.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 8[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries 70,469 74.09
Working Families Hakeem Jeffries 6,786 7.13
Total Hakeem Jeffries (Incumbent) 77,255 81.22
Conservative (N.Y.) Alan Bellone 6,673 7.02
None Blank/Void/Write-In 11,185 11.76
Total votes 95,113 100

District 9[edit]

The 9th district is located entirely within the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The incumbent is Democrat Yvette Clarke, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 11th district from 2007 to 2013. She was re-elected in 2012 with 87% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+32.

Clarke has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations. Daniel J. Cavanagh, the Republican nominee for the seat in 2012, has received the Conservative Party nomination.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 9[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke 70,997 69.87
Working Families Yvette Clarke 11,662 11.48
Total Yvette Clarke (Incumbent) 82,659 81.35
Conservative (N.Y.) Daniel J. Cavanagh 9,727 9.57
None Blank/Void/Write-In 9,220 9.07
Total votes 101,606 100

District 10[edit]

The 10th district is located in New York City and includes the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the west side of Lower Manhattan, including Greenwich Village and the Financial District, and parts of Brooklyn, including Borough Park. The incumbent is Democrat Jerrold Nadler, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 8th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 17th district from 1992 to 1993. He was re-elected in 2012 with 90% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+23.

Nadler has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations. Lolita M. Ferrin has received the Independence Party nomination and Ross Brady, a former Republican nominee for the State Assembly and former Conservative nominee for the State Senate and the State Supreme Court, has received the Conservative Party nomination.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 10[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerrold Nadler 73,945 65.31
Working Families Jerrold Nadler 15,135 13.37
Total Jerrold Nadler (Incumbent) 89,080 78.67
Conservative (N.Y.) Ross Brady 12,042 10.64
Flourish Every Person Michael J. Dilger 554 0.49
None Blank/Void/Write-In 11,550 10.20
Total votes 113,226 100

District 11[edit]

The 11th district is located entirely in New York City and includes all of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn. The incumbent is Republican Michael Grimm, who has represented the district since 2011. He was elected in 2010, defeating incumbent Democrat Michael McMahon with 51% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+2.

Grimm, who has been indicted on charges including mail fraud and wire fraud due to ongoing campaign finance investigations from his successful run for the 13th district in 2010,[20] has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2] The only way he can be removed from the ballot is by moving out of the state, running for a judgeship or being convicted before the general election.[21] Should Grimm be removed from the ballot, potential Republican candidates include former U.S. Representative Vito Fossella, State Senator Andrew Lanza, State Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis, State Assemblyman Joseph Borelli, former State Assemblyman Matthew Mirones, Richmond County District Attorney and nominee for New York Attorney General in 2010 Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., Staten Island Borough President James Oddo, New York City Council Minority Leader Vincent M. Ignizio and New York City Councilman Steven Matteo. Potential Democratic candidates include State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, former U.S. Representative Michael McMahon, State Senator Diane Savino, New York City Councilwoman Debi Rose and State Assemblyman Matthew Titone.[22][23]

McMahon considering a rematch against Grimm, but decided against it.[24] Domenic Recchia, a former member of the New York City Council,[25][26] and Erick Salgado, Pastor of the Church of Iglesia Jovenes Cristianos and candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2013,[27] were running for the Democratic nomination.[2] However, Salgado was removed from the ballot after failing to file enough nominating petition signatures. Recchia thus won the Democratic nomination unopposed.[28]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Michael
Grimm (R)
Domenic
Recchia (D)
Henry
Bardel (G)
Undecided
Siena College October 26–28, 2014 713 ± 3.7% 53% 34% 5% 7%
GBA Strategies* September 2014 400 ± 4.9% 46% 46% 8%
Siena College September 9–14, 2014 585 ± 4% 44% 40% 4% 12%
  • * Internal poll for the Domenic Recchia campaign
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 11[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Grimm 48,291 43.51
Conservative (N.Y.) Michael Grimm 8,251 7.43
Independence Michael Grimm 2,344 2.11
Total Michael Grimm (Incumbent) 58,886 53.05
Democratic Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. 41,429 37.32
Working Families Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. 3,815 3.44
Total Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. 45,244 40.76
Green Henry J. Bardel 2,687 2.42
None Blank/Void/Write-In 4,182 3.77
Total votes 110,999 100

District 12[edit]

The 12th district is located entirely in New York City and includes several neighborhoods in the East Side of Manhattan, Greenpoint and western Queens. The incumbent is Democrat Carolyn Maloney, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 14th district from 1993 to 2013. She was re-elected in 2012 with 80% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+27.

Maloney has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations. Nicholas S. Di Iorio has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 12[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Maloney 78,440 66.80
Working Families Carolyn Maloney 12,163 10.36
Total Carolyn Maloney (Incumbent) 90,603 77.16
Republican Nicholas S. Di Iorio 19,564 16.66
Conservative (N.Y.) Nicholas S. Di Iorio 1,841 1.57
Independence Nicholas S. Di Iorio 1,326 1.13
Total Nicholas S. Di Iorio 22,731 19.36
None Blank/Void/Write-In 4,086 3.48
Total votes 117,420 100

District 13[edit]

The 13th district is located entirely in New York City and includes Upper Manhattan and a small portion of the western Bronx. The incumbent is Democrat Adriano Espaillat, who has represented the district since 2017. The district has a PVI of D+42.

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Charlie
Rangel
Adriano
Espaillat
Yolonda
Garcia
Mike
Walrond
Other Undecided
Siena June 14–18, 2014 707 ± 3.7% 47% 34% 4% 7% 8%
Siena May 15–20, 2014 678 ± 3.8% 41% 32% 5% 6% 1% 15%

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charles B. Rangel 23,799 47.76
Democratic Adriano Espaillat 21,477 43.10
Democratic Michael A. Walrond, Jr. 3,954 7.94
Democratic Yolanda Garcia 597 1.20
Total votes 49,827 100

Third party candidates[edit]

Daniel Vila Rivera has received the Green Party nomination and Kenneth D. Schaeffer, a candidate for the State Supreme Court in 2005 and 2010, has received the Working Families Party nomination.[2]

General Election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Charlie
Rangel (D)
Daniel
Vila Rivera (G)
Kennith D.
Schaeffer (WF)
Undecided
YouGov October 16–23, 2014 71 ± 17% 35% 44% 1% 20%
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 13[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charles B. Rangel 63,437 69.08
Working Families Charles B. Rangel 4,959 5.40
Total Charles B. Rangel (Incumbent) 68,396 74.48
Green Daniel Vila Rivera 9,806 10.68
None Blank/Void/Write-In 13,632 14.84
Total votes 91,834 100

District 14[edit]

The 14th district is located in New York City and includes the eastern Bronx and part of north-central Queens. The incumbent is Democrat Joseph Crowley, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 7th district from 1999 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 83% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+26.

Crowley has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations. Elizabeth Perri, a Conservative nominee for the State Senate in 2012 and the Republican nominee for Bronx Borough President in 2013, has received the Conservative nomination.[2]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 14[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Crowley 45,370 67.34
Working Families Joseph Crowley 4,982 7.39
Total Joseph Crowley (Incumbent) 50,352 74.74
Conservative (N.Y.) Elizabeth Perri 6,735 10.00
None Blank/Void/Write-In 10,285 15.27
Total votes 67,372 100

District 15[edit]

The 15th district is located entirely within The Bronx in New York City and is the smallest district by area in the entire country. The incumbent is Democrat José E. Serrano, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 16th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 18th district from 1990 to 1993. He was re-elected in 2012 with 97% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+43.

New York City Councilwoman Annabel Palma had considered challenging Serrano in the primary,[29] but decided against it.[30] Democratic State Senator Rubén Díaz, Sr. has also declined to run against Serrano.[29] Chess player and perennial candidate Sam Sloan is running against Serrano in the Democratic primary.[2]

Serrano has received the Working Families nomination. Eduardo Ramirez, a candidate for the State Assembly in 2012 and the New York City Council in 2013, has received the Conservative nomination. William Edstrom, a candidate for the State Assembly in 2012, has received the Green nomination.[2]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jose E. Serrano 10,346 91.15
Democratic Sam Sloan 1,004 8.85
Total votes 11,350 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 15[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jose E. Serrano 53,128 86.71
Working Families Jose E. Serrano 1,778 2.90
Total Jose E. Serrano (Incumbent) 54,906 89.62
Conservative (N.Y.) Eduardo Ramirez 1,047 1.71
Green William Edstrom 568 0.93
None Blank/Void/Write-In 4,747 7.75
Total votes 61,268 100

District 16[edit]

The 16th district is located in the northern part of The Bronx and the southern half of Westchester County, including the cities of Mount Vernon, Yonkers and Rye. The incumbent is Democrat Eliot Engel, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 17th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 19th district from 1989 to 1993. He was re-elected in 2012 with 76% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+21.

Engel has received the nominations of the Democratic and Working Families parties. Patrick A. McManus, a perennial candidate for office, was the Conservative nominee, but the board rejected his petition as invalid, taking him off of the ballot for the primary election.[2] Therefore, Engel is un-opposed for re-election.

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 16[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eliot Engel 90,088 64.97
Working Families Eliot Engel 9,570 6.90
Total Eliot Engel (Incumbent) 99,658 71.87
None Blank/Void/Write-In 38,997 28.13
Total votes 138,655 100

District 17[edit]

The 17th district contains all of Rockland County and the northern and central portions of Westchester County, including the cities of Peekskill and White Plains. The incumbent is Democrat Nita Lowey, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 18th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 20th district from 1989 to 1993. She was re-elected in 2012 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+5.

Lowey has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations. Chris Day, an Army veteran of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars and private equity/venture capital investment professional, is challenging her as the Republican and Conservative Party nominee. The Independence Party line will not be active in this election after Lowey's ballot access petitions were rejected by the Board of Elections.[2][31][32]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 17[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nita Lowey 89,295 49.15
Working Families Nita Lowey 8,855 4.87
Total Nita Lowey (Incumbent) 98,150 54.03
Republican Christopher E. Day 63,549 34.98
Conservative (N.Y.) Christopher E. Day 12,232 6.73
Total Christopher E. Day 75,781 41.71
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,743 4.26
Total votes 181,674 100

District 18[edit]

The 18th district is located in the northern suburbs and exurbs of New York City and includes all of Orange and Putnam counties, as well as parts of southern Dutchess and northeastern Westchester counties. The incumbent is Democrat Sean Patrick Maloney, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, defeating Republican incumbent Nan Hayworth with 52% of the vote and the district has an even PVI.

Hayworth is seeking a rematch with Maloney.[33] State Senator Gregory R. Ball declined to seek the Republican nomination, praising Maloney in a statement: "We have a great working relationship and he and his office are to be applauded, for they have bent over backwards to mutually assist shared constituents."[34][35] He formally endorsed Maloney in September 2014, praising his work on veterans' issues.[36] Another Republican State Senator, Bill Larkin, also cited veterans' issues as the reason for his endorsing Maloney.[37]

Hayworth has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations and Maloney has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations.

Independence primary[edit]

Independence primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Independence Nan Hayworth 780 53.35
Independence Sean Patrick Maloney 682 46.65
Total votes 1,462 100

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Sean Patrick
Maloney (D)
Nan
Hayworth (R)
Other Undecided
Siena College October 24–27, 2014 682 ± 3.8% 49% 44% 7%
Public Opinion Strategies* October 23–25, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 42% 42% 3%[38] 13%
Siena College October 15–16, 2014 253 ± 4% 41% 52% 8%
Public Opinion Strategies* October 12–13, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 43% 39% 2%[38] 16%
Gravis Marketing September 2014 601 ± 4% 46% 40% 15%
Siena College September 12–17, 2014 590 ± 4% 50% 42% 8%
Gravis Marketing July 17–19, 2014 523 ± 4% 40% 44% 16%
  • * Internal poll for the Nan Hayworth campaign
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 18[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sean Patrick Maloney 76,235 40.83
Working Families Sean Patrick Maloney 12,758 6.83
Total Sean Patrick Maloney (Incumbent) 88,993 47.66
Republican Nan Hayworth 66,523 35.63
Conservative (N.Y.) Nan Hayworth 15,714 8.42
Independence Nan Hayworth 3,423 1.83
Total Nan Hayworth 85,660 45.88
Independent Scott A. Smith 4,294 2.30
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,768 4.16
Total votes 186,715 100

District 19[edit]

The 19th district is located in New York's Hudson Valley and Catskills regions and includes all of Columbia, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, Schoharie, Sullivan and Ulster counties, and parts of Broome, Dutchess, Montgomery and Rensselaer counties. The incumbent is Republican Chris Gibson, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 20th district from 2011 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 53% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+1.

Sean Eldridge, an investment fund president and political activist,[39] has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations and Gibson has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Chris
Gibson (R)
Sean
Eldridge (D)
Undecided
Siena College October 22–24, 2014 727 ± 3.6% 58% 35% 7%
Public Opinion Strategies* October 14–15, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 56% 30% 14%
Siena September 4, 7–9, 2014 609 ± 4% 57% 33% 10%
DFM Research July 7–12, 2014 405 ± 4.9% 56% 29% 15%
  • * Internal poll for the Chris Gibson campaign
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 19[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Gibson 102,118 48.55
Conservative (N.Y.) Chris Gibson 20,420 9.71
Independence Chris Gibson 9,056 4.31
Total Chris Gibson (Incumbent) 131,594 62.56
Democratic Sean S. Eldridge 60,533 28.78
Working Families Sean S. Eldridge 11,937 5.67
Total Sean S. Eldridge 72,470 34.45
None Blank/Void/Write-In 6,287 2.99
Total votes 210,351 100

District 20[edit]

The 20th district is located in the Capital District and includes all of Albany and Schenectady counties, and portions of Montgomery, Rensselear and Saratoga counties. The incumbent is Democrat Paul Tonko, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 21st district from 2009 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 68% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+7.

Tonko has received the Democratic, Working Families and Independence Party nominations. Businessman Jim Fischer has received the Republican and Conservative Party nominations.[2][40]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 20[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul D. Tonko 103,437 48.80
Working Families Paul D. Tonko 11,285 5.32
Independence Paul D. Tonko 10,389 4.90
Total Paul D. Tonko (Incumbent) 125,111 59.02
Republican James M. Fischer 61,820 29.17
Conservative (N.Y.) James M. Fischer 17,284 8.15
Total James M. Fischer 79,104 37.32
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,750 3.66
Total votes 211,965 100

District 21[edit]

The 21st district, the state's largest and most rural, includes most of the North Country, as well as the northern suburbs of Syracuse and borders Vermont to the east. The incumbent is Democrat Bill Owens, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 23rd district from 2009 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 50% of the vote and the district has an even PVI.

Owens, who has been in Congress since winning a 2009 special election, announced he would not seek re-election on January 14, 2014.[41]

Democratic primary[edit]

For the Democrats, former Republican Assemblywoman Dede Scozzafava, Chairman of the Essex County Board of Supervisors Randy Douglas,[42] Assemblywoman Addie Jenne Russell,[43] Plattsburgh Town Supervisor Bernie Bassett, director of economic development for Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Jonathan Cardinal,[44] former Oswego Mayor John T. Sullivan, Jr.[45] and former Congressman Scott Murphy[46] all declined to run. Former State Senator Darrel Aubertine initially left open the possibility of running but also eventually declined.[47] The Democratic county committee chairs in the district thus nominated Aaron Woolf, a relatively unknown grocery store owner and filmmaker with a home in Elizabethtown, as their nominee at a meeting on February 12, 2014.[48][49] In response, Macomb town councilman Stephen Burke declared his candidacy, but he was removed from the ballot after he filed insufficient ballot petition signatures. Green candidate Donald Hassig was also removed for the same reason.[50][51] Woolf has received the Working Families Party nomination.[2]

Candidates[edit]
Nominee
  • Aaron Woolf, grocery store owner and filmmaker (designated party nominee)[48]
Removed from ballot
Declined

Republican primary[edit]

The county Republican committees endorsed Elise Stefanik, a former aide in the George W. Bush Administration, as their designated candidate in a meeting on February 7, 2014.[58] Michael Ring, a broadcast engineer and political activist from Jefferson County, and Jamie Waller, a former Marine and political consultant, both initially entered the race but withdrew in March.[41] Former 2012 nominee Matt Doheny entered the race.[59][60][61] Actor John James, Warren County District Attorney Kate Hogan, State Senator Betty Little and 2009 and 2010 Conservative Party nominee Doug Hoffman did not run.[59][60][62]

Joseph Gilbert, the former emergency services director for St. Lawrence County and a local Tea Party activist, withdrew from the Republican primary on April 11, 2014 due to personal and family problems. He may still run in the general election under the banner of the Constitution Party if he can resolve those problems by June.[63] Doheny and Stefanik also sought the Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2] Stefanik won the Conservative endorsement[64] and Doheny won the Independence nomination, but after he lost the Republican primary, announced his support for Stefanik.[65] He was eventually removed from the ballot and Stefanik took the Independence Party nomination.[66]

Candidates[edit]
Declared
Withdrew
  • Joe Gilbert, retired Army major and tea party activist (still in the general election; has received the Constitution Party nomination)[63][70]
  • Michael Ring, broadcast engineer and computer consultant[71][72]
  • Jamie Waller, former Marine and political consultant[73][74]
Declined
Endorsements[edit]
Matt Doheny
Individuals
Elise Stefanik
Individuals
Joe Gilbert
Individuals
  • Susan D. Harris, columnist[81]
Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Matt
Doheny
Elise
Stefanik
Undecided
Harper Polling June 16–18, 2014 498 ± 4.39% 37% 45% 18%
Public Opinion Strategies^ January 20–21, 2014 283 ± 5.83% 49% 13% 38%
  • ^ Internal poll for the Matt Doheny campaign
Results[edit]
Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elise Stefanik 16,489 60.82
Republican Matt Doheny 10,620 39.18
Total votes 27,109 100

Green Party primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]
Declared
  • Matt Funicello, bakery owner and political activist[82]
Removed from ballot
  • Donald Hassig, environmental activist and nominee for the seat in 2012[82][51]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Elise
Stefanik (R)
Aaron
Woolf (D)
Matt
Funicello (G)
Matt
Doheny (I)
Undecided
Harper Polling October 27–28, 2014 560 ± 4.14% 47% 33% 14% 6%
Siena College October 20–22, 2014 674 ± 3.76% 50% 32% 11% 8%
Harper Polling September 25–29, 2014 674 ± 3.76% 45% 37% 8% 10%
Siena September 4, 7–9, 2014 591 ± 4% 46% 33% 10% 1% 12%
External Links
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 21[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elise M. Stefanik 79,615 43.85
Conservative (N.Y.) Elise M. Stefanik 12,207 6.72
Independence Elise M. Stefanik 4,404 2.43
Total Elise M. Stefanik 96,226 53.00
Democratic Aaron G. Woolf 53,140 29.27
Working Families Aaron G. Woolf 5,923 3.26
Total Aaron G. Woolf 59,063 32.53
Green Matthew J. Funiciello 19,238 10.60
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,031 3.87
Total votes 181,558 100

District 22[edit]

The 22nd district is located in Central New York and includes all of Chenango, Cortland, Madison and Oneida counties, and parts of Broome, Herkimer, Oswego and Tioga counties.

Republican primary[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Richard L. Hanna, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 24th district from 2011 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+3.

Republican State Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney ran against Hanna in the Republican primary, but Hanna defeated Tenney in the primary election. No Democrat filed to run for the seat.[83] Hanna has also received the Conservative and Independence Party nominations as well.[2]

Results[edit]
Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard L. Hanna 16,119 53.52
Republican Claudia Tenney 14,000 46.48
Total votes 30,119 100

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 22[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard L. Hanna 113,574 64.76
Independence Richard L. Hanna 16,277 9.28
Total Richard L. Hanna (Incumbent) 129,851 74.04
None Blank/Void/Write-In 45,521 25.96
Total votes 175,372 100

District 23[edit]

The 23rd district includes all of Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tompkins and Yates counties, along with parts of Ontario and Tioga counties. The incumbent is Republican Tom Reed, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 29th district from 2009 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 52% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+3.

Reed has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations. Democrat Martha Robertson, the Chairman of the Tompkins County legislature, has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations.[84]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Tom
Reed (R)
Generic
Democrat
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 3–4, 2013 908 ± ? 42% 48% 10%
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 23[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas W. Reed, II 94,375 49.53
Conservative (N.Y.) Thomas W. Reed, II 13,917 7.30
Independence Thomas W. Reed, II 4,838 2.54
Total Thomas W. Reed, II (Incumbent) 113,130 59.37
Democratic Martha Robertson 60,233 31.61
Working Families Martha Robertson 10,009 5.25
Total Martha Robertson 70,242 36.86
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,182 3.77
Total votes 190,554 100

District 24[edit]

The 24th district includes all of Cayuga, Onondaga and Wayne counties, and the western part of Oswego County. The incumbent is Democrat Dan Maffei, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 25th district from 2009 to 2011. He was re-elected in 2012 with 49% of the vote, defeating Republican incumbent Ann Marie Buerkle, who had beaten Maffei in 2010. The district has a PVI of D+5.

Maffei has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations. Buerkle initially considered challenging Maffei again in 2014,[85] but declined to run in September 2013. Instead, the Republicans endorsed U.S. Attorney John Katko.[86] Retired Army Lieutenant Colonel John Lemondes had considered running against Katko in the Republican primary, but decided against it.[87][88][89] Katko also has the Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Maffei (D)
John
Katko (R)
Undecided
Siena College October 22–24, 2014 704 ± 3.7% 42% 52% 6%
Global Strategy Group^ October 20–22, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 45% 40% 15%
Public Opinion Strategies* September 22–23, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 46% 43% 11%
Siena College September 17–18, 2014 598 ± 4% 50% 42% 8%
Public Opinion Strategies* July 27–29, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 45% 40% 15%
  • ^ Internal poll for the Dan Maffei campaign
  • * Internal poll for the John Katko campaign
Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 24[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John M. Katko 93,881 46.15
Conservative (N.Y.) John M. Katko 17,768 8.73
Independence John M. Katko 6,825 3.36
Total John M. Katko 118,474 58.24
Democratic Daniel B. Maffei 72,631 35.71
Working Families Daniel B. Maffei 7,673 3.77
Total Daniel B. Maffei (Incumbent) 80,304 39.48
None Blank/Void/Write-In 4,639 2.28
Total votes 203,417 100

District 25[edit]

The 25th district located entirely within Monroe County, centered on the city of Rochester. The incumbent is Democrat Louise Slaughter, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 28th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 30th district from 1987 to 1993. She was re-elected in 2012 with 57% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+7.

Due to Slaughter's age and recent health problems, there was speculation that she might retire, with Rochester Mayor Lovely A. Warren considered likely to run for the Democrats.[90] On January 15, 2014, Slaughter confirmed that she was running again.[91] She has received the Democratic and Working Families nominations.[2]

Republican Mark Assini, the Town Supervisor of Gates and the Conservative nominee for the seat in 2004, has received the Republican and Conservative Party nominations.[2] Independent Tim Dean is also running.[92]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 25[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Louise M. Slaughter 87,264 44.41
Working Families Louise M. Slaughter 9,539 4.85
Total Louise M. Slaughter (Incumbent) 96,803 49.26
Republican Mark W. Assini 75,990 38.67
Conservative (N.Y.) Mark W. Assini 19,942 10.15
Total Mark W. Assini 95,932 48.82
None Blank/Void/Write-In 3,781 1.92
Total votes 196,516 100

District 26[edit]

The 25th district located in Erie and Niagara counties and includes the cities of Buffalo and Niagara Falls. The incumbent is Democrat Brian Higgins, who has represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 27th district from 2005 to 2013. He was re-elected in 2012 with 75% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+12.

Higgins has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations. Kathy Weppner, a former talk radio host, has received the Republican and Conservative Party nominations.[2][93]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 26[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brian Higgins 100,648 57.87
Working Families Brian Higgins 12,562 7.22
Total Brian Higgins (Incumbent) 113,210 65.10
Republican Kathleen A. Weppner 38,477 22.12
Conservative (N.Y.) Kathleen A. Weppner 14,432 8.30
Total Kathleen A. Weppner 52,909 30.42
None Blank/Void/Write-In 7,792 4.48
Total votes 173,911 100

District 27[edit]

The 27th district is located in Western New York and includes all of Orleans, Genesee, Wyoming and Livingston counties, and parts of Erie, Monroe, Niagara and Ontario counties. The incumbent is Republican Chris Collins, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, defeating Democratic incumbent Kathy Hochul with 51% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+8.

Collins has received the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party nominations.[2] Hochul has terminated her campaign committee; she is instead running for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 2014.[94] Jim O'Donnell, a Buffalo police officer, has received the Democratic and Working Families Party nominations.[2][95]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]
US House election, 2014: New York District 27[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Collins 109,171 50.74
Conservative (N.Y.) Chris Collins 27,605 12.83
Independence Chris Collins 7,899 3.67
Total Chris Collins (Incumbent) 144,675 67.24
Democratic James D. O'Donnell 50,939 23.68
Working Families James D. O'Donnell 7,972 3.71
Total James D. O'Donnell 58,911 27.38
None Blank/Void/Write-In 11,561 5.37
Total votes 215,147 100

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://history.house.gov/Institution/Election-Statistics/Election-Statistics/
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External links[edit]