Krasi, Thalassa Kai T' Agori Mou

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Greece "Krasi, Thalassa Kai T' Agori Mou"
Marinella-krasi-ESC1974.jpg
Eurovision Song Contest 1974 entry
Country Greece
Artist(s) Marinella
Language Greek
Composer(s) Giorgos Katsaros
Lyricist(s) Pythagoras
Conductor Giorgos Katsaros
Finals performance
Final result 11th
Final points 7
Appearance chronology
"Panayia Mou, Panayia Mou" (1976) ►

"Krasi, thalassa kai t' agori mou" (Greek: "Κρασί, θάλασσα και τ' αγόρι μου"; English translation: "Wine, sea and my boyfriend") was the Greek entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 1974, performed in Greek by Marinella. The song is a typical Greek traditional bouzouki tune, with Marinella singing that all she needs in life is "wine, the sea and [her] boyfriend".[1][2]

Composed and conducted by Giorgos Katsaros with lyrics by Pythagoras, "Krasi, thalassa kai t' agori mou" was the first song to represent Greece at the Eurovision Song Contest.[3] Popular Greek singer Marinella was selected to sing the song at the Eurovision Song Contest 1974 which took place in Brighton, England on April 6, 1974. The song was presented fifth out of the seventeen entries of the night and followed Norway's Anne-Karine Strøm with "The First Day of Love" while preceding Israel's Poogy with "Natati La Khayay". At the close of voting, the performance had received seven points, placing it eleventh in the field of 17.[3]

"Krasi, Thalassa Kai T' Agori Mou" was succeeded as the Greek representative at the 1976 Contest by Mariza Koch with "Panayia Mou, Panayia Mou".[4] Greece had pulled out of the 1975 Contest for "unknown reasons" according to the EBU, but it was later discovered that the withdrawal was in protest of Turkey's debut and its invasion of Cyprus in July 1974.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marinella - Krasi, Thalassa Kai T' Agori Mou 1974 at Discogs
  2. ^ Marinella - Krasi, Thalassa Kai T' Agori Mou 1974 at rateyourmusic.com
  3. ^ a b Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1974". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  4. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1976". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  5. ^ Raycoff, Ivan; Robert Deayom Tobin (July 2007). A Song for Europe. Aldershot, Hampshire, England: Ashgate Publishing. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-7546-5878-8.