List of nicknames used by Donald Trump

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump became widely known during the 2016 United States presidential election and his subsequent presidency for using nicknames to criticize[1] or otherwise express commentary about media figures, politicians, and foreign leaders.[2][3][4]

The list excludes commonly-used hypocorisms such as "Mike" for "Michael" or "Steve" for "Steven", unless they are original to Trump. Nicknames that Trump did not originate are annotated with footnotes.

The list also includes nicknames used by figures associated with Trump, and nicknames he has promoted via retweeting.

Domestic political figures[edit]

Nickname Personal name Notes
Dumbo[5] Randolph "Tex" Alles Former Director of the United States Secret Service
1% Joe[6] Joe Biden Former U.S. Senator from Delaware; 47th Vice President of the United States; Trump's opponent in the 2020 United States Presidential election; 46th President of the United States
Basement Biden[7]
Beijing Biden[8]
China Joe[9]
Corrupt Joe[10]
Crazy Joe Biden[11]
Quid Pro Joe[12]
Sleepy Joe[13]
Sleepy Creepy Joe[14]
Slow Joe[15]
Joe Hiden[16]
Little Michael[17] Michael Bloomberg 108th Mayor of New York City; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate; CEO of Bloomberg L.P.
Mini Mike Bloomberg[18][19]
Da Nang Richard[20] Richard Blumenthal U.S. senator from Connecticut; 23rd attorney general of Connecticut
Da Nang Dick[21]
Mr. Tough Guy[22] John Bolton Former U.S. national security advisor and United States ambassador to the United Nations
Gov. Jerry "Moonbeam" Brown[23][a] Jerry Brown 34th and 39th Governor of California; 31st Attorney General of California; former Secretary of State of California, 6th chair of the California Democratic Party
Low Energy Jeb[1] Jeb Bush 43rd Governor of Florida; 2016 Republican presidential candidate
Alfred E. Neuman[24] Pete Buttigieg Former Mayor of South Bend, Indiana; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate; 19th United States Secretary of Transportation
Boot-Edge-Edge[25][b]
Sleepy Ben Carson[26] Ben Carson 17th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2017–21); 2016 Republican presidential candidate; retired neurosurgeon
Sleepin' Bob Casey[27] Bob Casey U.S. senator from Pennsylvania
The Warmonger[28] Liz Cheney U.S. representative for Wyoming's at-large congressional district; former Chair of the House Republican Conference
Wild Bill[29] Bill Clinton 42nd President of the United States; 40th and 42nd Governor of Arkansas; 50th Attorney General of Arkansas; former chair of the National Governors Association
Crazy Hillary[30] Hillary Clinton Former First Lady of the United States; former U.S. Secretary of State; 2016 Democratic presidential nominee
Heartless Hillary[31][32][33]
Lyin' Hillary[34][35]
Crooked Hillary[1]
Nasty Woman[36]
Leakin' James Comey[37] James Comey Former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation fired by Trump; former United States deputy attorney general; former United States acting attorney general
Lyin' James Comey[38]
Sanctimonious James Comey[39]
Shadey James Comey[40]
Slimeball James Comey[41]
Slippery James Comey[29]
Liddle' Bob Corker[1] Bob Corker Former U.S. senator from Tennessee; chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
Lyin' Ted[1] Ted Cruz Former solicitor general of Texas; U.S. senator from Texas; 2016 Republican presidential candidate
Texas Ted[42]
Beautiful Ted[42]
Sleepin' Joe[43] Joe Donnelly Former U.S. senator from Indiana; former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Indiana
Dicky Durbin[44] Dick Durbin U.S. senator from Illinois; Senate Majority Whip and deputy Senate Democratic leader
Mark Yesper[45] Mark Esper 27th secretary of defense
Leaking Dianne Feinstein[46] Dianne Feinstein U.S. Senator from California; former chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee; 38th Mayor of San Francisco
Sneaky Dianne Feinstein[47]
Jeff Flakey[48] Jeff Flake Former U.S. Senator from Arizona; former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Arizona
Rejected Senator Jeff Flake[49]
The Flake[50]
Al Frankenstein[51] Al Franken Former U.S. Senator from Minnesota
Lightweight Senator Kirsten Gillibrand[52] Kirsten Gillibrand Junior United States senator from New York; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Nasty Kamala[53] Kamala Harris 49th Vice President of the United States; U.S. Senator from California; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Nasty Woman[54]
Phony Kamala[55][56]
Puppet Jones[57][58] Doug Jones U.S. Senator from Alabama
Big Jim[59] Jim Justice 36th Governor of West Virginia
Corrupt Kaine[60] Tim Kaine U.S. Senator from Virginia; running mate of Hillary Clinton in the 2016 U.S. presidential election
1 for 38 [1][61][c] John Kasich 69th Governor of Ohio; 2016 Republican presidential candidate; former U.S. representative from Ohio's 12th district
1 for 41[61][c]
1 for 44[61][c]
Lamb the Sham[62] Conor Lamb Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania and Marine Corps veteran
Senator Joe Munchkin[63] Joe Manchin U.S. senator from West Virginia; 34th governor of West Virginia from 2005 to 2010; former secretary of state of West Virginia
Mad dog[d] James Mattis 26th Secretary of Defense
Moderate dog[64]
Evan McMuffin[65][66] Evan McMullin Former CIA operations officer; 2016 Independent presidential candidate
Fat Jerry[67] Jerry Nadler U.S. representative from New York's 10th congressional district; chair of the Committee on the Judiciary
That dog[68] Omarosa Manigault Newman Former Apprentice contestant; aide to President Trump
Wacky and Deranged Omarosa[69]
Wacky Omarosa[70]
Cheatin' Obama[71][44] Barack Obama 44th President of the United States, former U.S. Senator from Illinois; former Illinois state senator
Eva Perón[72] Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez U.S. representative from New York
Evita [72]
Foul Mouthed Omar[73] Ilhan Omar U.S. representative from Minnesota
Dummy Beto[74] Beto O'Rourke Former U.S. representative from Texas; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
The Flailer[75]
Truly weird Senator Rand Paul[76] Rand Paul U.S. Senator from Kentucky
Crazy Nancy[77] Nancy Pelosi Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
MS-13 Lover[78]
Nancy[79]
Nancy Antoinette[80]
Nervous Nancy[81]
Mike Pounce[82] Mike Pence 48th Vice President of the United States
Wacky Jacky[83] Jacky Rosen U.S. Senator from Nevada, former U.S. representative from Nevada's 3rd congressional district
Mr. Peepers[84] (denied by Trump)[85] Rod Rosenstein United States Deputy Attorney General
Liddle Marco[1] Marco Rubio U.S. Senator from Florida; 2016 Republican presidential candidate; former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives
Little Marco[1]
0% Tim Ryan[86] Tim Ryan U.S. representative from Ohio; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Basically Braindead Bernie[1] Bernie Sanders U.S. Senator from Vermont; 2016 & 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Crazy Bernie[87]
The Nutty Professor[88]
Little Ben Sasse[89][28] Ben Sasse U.S. senator from Nebraska
Adam Schitt[90] Adam Schiff U.S. representative for California's 28th congressional district; Chair of House Intelligence Committee; former California State Senator
Pencil Neck[91]
Liddle' Adam Schiff[92]
Shifty Schiff[93]
Sick Puppy[94]
Cryin' Chuck[95] Chuck Schumer U.S. Senator from New York and Senate Majority Leader
Crazy Arnold[96] Arnold Schwarzenegger 38th Governor of California from 2003 to 2011; actor; former professional bodybuilder
Mr. Magoo[84] (denied by Trump)[85] Jeff Sessions 84th United States attorney general; former U.S. senator from Alabama; former attorney general of Alabama
Impeachment Tom[97] Tom Steyer Democratic activist and fundraiser; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Wacky Tom Steyer"[98]
Weirdo Tom Steyer[99]
Big Luther[100][e] Luther Strange Former U.S. Senator from Alabama; 47th Attorney General of Alabama
Goofy Elizabeth Warren[101][102][31] Elizabeth Warren U.S. Senator from Massachusetts; former chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel; 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Uber Left Elizabeth Warren[103]
Pocahontas[1][104]
Crazy Maxine Waters[105] Maxine Waters U.S. representative for California's 43rd congressional district; chair of the House Financial Services Committee
Low-IQ Maxine Waters[106]
That woman from Michigan[107] Gretchen Whitmer 49th Governor of Michigan
Gretchen Half-Whitmer[107]
Wacky Congresswoman Wilson[1] Frederica Wilson U.S. representative for Florida's 24th congressional district

Foreign leaders[edit]

Nickname Personal name Notes
Tropical Trump[108] Jair Bolsonaro President of Brazil
Animal Assad[109] Bashar al-Assad President of Syria
The King of Europe[110] Nigel Farage Brexit Party Leader United Kingdom
Britain Trump[111] Boris Johnson Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Rocket Man [1] Kim Jong-un Supreme Leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Little Rocket Man[112][113]
Juan Trump[114][115] Andrés Manuel López Obrador President of Mexico
Mad Alex[116] Alex Salmond Former first minister of Scotland and advocate of Scottish independence
Justin from Canada[117] Justin Trudeau 23rd prime minister of Canada

Media figures[edit]

Nickname Personal name Notes
Crazy Jim Acosta[118] Jim Acosta CNN Chief White House correspondent
Sloppy Steve[119] Steve Bannon 2016 Trump campaign CEO; former Trump administration White House chief strategist; executive chair of Breitbart News
Wacky Glenn Beck[1] Glenn Beck Talk show host
No Talent Samantha Bee[120] Samantha Bee Host of Full Frontal with Samantha Bee
Dumb as a Rock[1] Mika Brzezinski Co-host of Morning Joe
Low I.Q. Crazy Mika[121]
Fredo[122] Chris Cuomo Anchor of Cuomo Prime Time
Little Donny Deutsch[123] Donny Deutsch Talk show host
The Chin[124] Thomas Friedman Political commentator and columnist for The New York Times
Crazy Megyn[1] Megyn Kelly Former Fox News anchor; former NBC News anchor/personality
Sour Lemon[125] Don Lemon CNN news anchor
Sloppy Michael Moore[126][f] Michael Moore Documentary filmmaker, progressive activist, and author
Mr. Kurd[127] Rahim Rashidi Kurdish reporter for Kurdistan TV
Mr. Off the Record[128] Philip Rucker Reporter for The Washington Post
Morning Psycho[129] Joe Scarborough Co-host of Morning Joe; former U.S. representative from Florida
Psycho Joe[1]
Little George[130][57] George Stephanopoulos Chief anchor and chief political correspondent of ABC News; former White House Communications Director and senior advisor to President Bill Clinton
Little Wise Guy[131]
Fake Jake[132] Jake Tapper Chief Washington Correspondent for CNN and host of The Lead with Jake Tapper
Sleepy Eyes[1][133] Chuck Todd Moderator of Meet the Press
Little Katy[134] Katy Tur Correspondent for NBC News and a host of MSNBC Live
Mike Wallace wannabe[135] Chris Wallace Moderator of Fox News Sunday
Negative Guy[136]
Lyin' Brian[137] Brian Williams Chief Anchor of MSNBC
Little Jeff Zucker[1] Jeff Zucker President of CNN Worldwide
Dopey Mort Zuckerman[138] Mortimer Zuckerman Media proprietor, investor, and owner of the New York Daily News

Groups of people[edit]

Nickname Group members Notes
13 Hardened Democrats[139]
Names of attorneys
Attorneys working on Robert Mueller's investigation of potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. The press identified thirteen of the seventeen attorneys as either being registered to vote as Democrats, or as making contributions to Democratic candidates. Those not identified as such denote with a star().[139] It is unclear whether this was the criteria Trump used to distinguish 13 out of 17 individuals since Trump did not detail who are the thirteen individuals that he included in the nicknames.
13 Angry Democrats[140]
17 Angry Democrats[141]
AOC Plus 3[142][g] Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Ilhan Omar
Ayanna Pressley
Rashida Tlaib
Informal political grouping of four Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives elected in 2018
The Squad[142][h]
O'Biden[143] Respectively the President and Vice President of the United States from 2009 to 2017; Biden was Trump's opponent in the 2020 United States Presidential election.

Other people[edit]

Nickname Personal name Notes
Dopey Prince[144] Al-Waleed bin Talal Saudi Arabian businessman, investor, philanthropist and a member of the Saudi royal family
The Pakistani mystery man[145] Imran Awan Former IT specialist for Democratic lawmakers, including U.S. representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Jeff Bozo[146] Jeff Bezos Founder, chairman, CEO, and president of Amazon
Husband From Hell[147] George Conway Attorney and husband of Kellyanne Conway. The "Mr. Kellyanne" nickname related to Conway's criticism of the appointment of Matthew Whitaker. The "Moonface" nickname responded to a video sponsored by The Lincoln Project.[148]
Moonface[149]
Mr. Kellyanne Conway[150]
Tim Apple[151] Tim Cook American business executive, CEO of Apple Inc. since 2011
Dopey Mark Cuban[152] Mark Cuban American entrepreneur and television star
Punchy[153] Robert De Niro Actor, producer, and director
Sir Charles[154] Charles Goldstein Real estate lawyer; Holocaust victims advocate
Little Mac Miller[155] Mac Miller Rapper; released the song "Donald Trump" in 2011, which caused Trump and Miller to feud for years, with Trump demanding royalties since Miller used his name

Organizations[edit]

Nickname Official name Notes
Fake ABC News[156] ABC News News network
Clinton News Network[157][i] CNN News channel (Cable News Network)
Fake News CNN[158][j]
Fraud News CNN[159]
Low ratings CNN[160]
Very Fake News[161][j]
D.C. Wolves[162] Democratic Party American political party
Democrat Party[163][k]
Do Nothing Democrats
Radical Left Democrats[164]
The Losers Project[165][166] The Lincoln Project Political action committee working against the reelection of Donald Trump which targets conservatives
MSDNC[167] MSNBC News channel
Corrupt New York Times[168] The New York Times Newspaper
Failing New York Times[1]
Old Grey Lady[169][l]
Amazon Washington Post[170] The Washington Post Newspaper owned by Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon

Television programs[edit]

Nickname Official name Notes
Deface the Nation[171] Face the Nation A weekly talk show on CBS
Meet the Depressed[172] Meet the Press A morning talk show on NBC
Morning Joke[173] Morning Joe A daily talk show on MSNBC

Miscellaneous[edit]

Nickname Usual name Notes
Ukraine Witch Hunt[174] Trump–Ukraine scandal A conversation between Trump and Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky where an intelligence analyst who listened in on the conversation blew the whistle and filed a complaint that Trump did something illegal
Russia Collusion Delusion[175] Trump's alleged involvement in the Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections
Presidential harassment[176][m] Criticism of himself by others
Trump derangement syndrome[177][n]
The Age of Trump[178] The Trump presidency
Crooked Press [179] Mainstream media publications
Dishonest Press[180]
Fake News Media[181][182][j]
Kung Flu[183] COVID-19 Disease that caused the COVID-19 pandemic
Plague from China[184]
China Virus[185][186]
Chinese Virus[187][188] Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 Virus that causes COVID-19

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brown has had the nickname "Moonbeam", coined by Mike Royko, since the 1970s, predating Trump's use of the nickname. See McKinley, Jesse (March 6, 2010). "How Jerry Brown Became 'Governor Moonbeam'". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 30, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  2. ^ Boot-Edge-Edge is a mnemonic aid that Pete Buttigieg used to help with the pronunciation of his last name. See Gabriel, Trip (March 28, 2019). "Pete Buttigieg (It's 'Boot-Edge-Edge') Is Making Waves in the 2020 Race". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c The name was in reference to Kasich winning only one state during the Republican primaries.
  4. ^ "Mad dog" is not original to Trump. Mattis acquired that nickname during his service in the Marines. See Ward, Alex (September 18, 2018). "From 'Mad Dog' to "Democrat": How Defense Secretary Mattis lost Trump". Vox. Archived from the original on November 9, 2020. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  5. ^ The nickname has been in use since at least 2010. During Strange's U.S. Senate campaign in 2017, Trump incorrectly implied that he was the first to use it.
  6. ^ The nickname was technically applied to Michael Moore's one person show
  7. ^ The nickname "AOC Plus 3" was originally coined by Laura Ingraham before Trump first used it days later. See Garcia, Victor (July 17, 2019). "Ingraham on AOC's America vs. Trump's". Fox News. Archived from the original on July 24, 2019. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  8. ^ The moniker "The Squad" originated in a November 2018 Instagram post by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and was used by the members of the group and the media before Trump used it. See ""The Squad": How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar got their nickname". CBS News. July 17, 2019. Archived from the original on July 17, 2019. Retrieved July 17, 2019.
  9. ^ The nickname has been in use since at least 2007. See Bosman, Julie (November 17, 2007). "A Clinton Friend's Role Sets Off Intense Criticism of CNN and a Re-examination". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 9, 2020. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  10. ^ a b c Hillary Clinton has been credited with using the term "Fake News" prior to Trump. She was documented to have used the term on December 8, 2016, in what was believed to have been a reference to the Pizzagate conspiracy theory. Trump was documented to have first used the term on January 11, 2017. See Borchers, Callum (January 3, 2018). "How Hillary Clinton might have inspired Trump's 'fake news' attacks". Washington Post. Archived from the original on February 6, 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  11. ^ Not original to Trump. See the article Democrat Party (epithet) for more details about the use of the term as an epithet.
  12. ^ The nickname "Old Grey Lady" and variations have been used to describe the newspaper by various sources since the 1950s. See Dwilson, Stephanie Dube (September 16, 2019). "The 'Old Grey Lady' in Trump's Tweet Is an Old Nickname for the New York Times". Heavy.com. Archived from the original on September 18, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  13. ^ Senator Mitch McConnell has been credited with coming up with this nickname. See Graham, David (January 3, 2019). "Trump's New Catchphrase Is an Attempt to Delegitimize Dissent". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  14. ^ Not original to Trump, see article Trump derangement syndrome.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Schallhorn, Kaitlyn (October 21, 2017). "Trump's nicknames for rivals, from 'Rocket Man' to 'Crooked Hillary'". Fox News. Archived from the original on November 15, 2017. Retrieved November 15, 2017.
  2. ^ Schwarz, Sam (December 11, 2017). "Donald Trump bullied CNN anchor Don Lemon, network says after presidential tweet". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved January 8, 2018.
  3. ^ Cillizza, Chris (November 27, 2017). "Bully in Chief: Donald Trump proves it again with his 'Pocahontas' attack". CNN. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  4. ^ Cillizza, Chris (October 10, 2017). "Donald Trump is acting like a fifth-grade bully". CNN. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  5. ^ Baker, Peter; Haberman, Maggie; Fandos, Nicholas; Kanno-Youngs, Zolan (April 8, 2019). "Trump Purge Set to Force Out More Top Homeland Security Officials". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 20, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Panetta, Grace (June 11, 2019). "Trump slams Joe Biden as 'mentally weak,' calling him '1% Joe' and saying he's 'slower than he used to be'". Business Insider. Archived from the original on November 14, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  7. ^ Midkiff, Sarah. "Why Trump's New Nickname For Biden Could Backfire". Refinery29. Archived from the original on September 17, 2020. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  8. ^ Ghosh, Nirmal (August 30, 2020). "US presidential election 2020: What's behind Trump's 'Beijing Biden' taunt?". The Straits Times. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  9. ^ "China has replaced Russia as 'the foreign hand' in American politics". The Indian Express. April 14, 2020. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  10. ^ "President Trump Town Hall hosted by Sean Hannity". Fox News. Archived from the original on October 21, 2020. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  11. ^ "Trump attacks 'crazy Joe Biden' after the former VP said he would have 'beat the hell out of' Trump for disrespecting women". CNBC. Associated Press. March 22, 2018. Archived from the original on December 19, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  12. ^ "Trump campaign calls Biden 'Quid Pro Joe' and says whistleblower is 'in favor of one of the corrupt 2020 Democrats'". Washington Examiner. September 29, 2019. Archived from the original on September 30, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  13. ^ Huppke, Rex. "Column: Biden drives a stake through Trump's 'Sleepy Joe' attacks, reminds us what we've missed in a leader". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on August 23, 2020. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  14. ^ Shaw, Adam (May 10, 2019). "Trump debuts new nickname for Biden: 'SleepyCreepy Joe'". Fox News Channel. Archived from the original on April 3, 2020. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  15. ^ ""Slow Joe & Phony Kamala": Trump Campaign Issues Blistering Statement On VP Pick". The Yeshiva World. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on October 14, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  16. ^ Phillips, Morgan (September 2, 2020). "Trump tries out new nickname: 'Joe Hiden'". Fox News. Archived from the original on September 2, 2020. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  17. ^ Hernandez, Michael (November 8, 2019). "Trump belittles Bloomberg, says 'little Mike will fall'". Anadolu Agency. Archived from the original on June 4, 2020. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  18. ^ Ward, Myah (March 4, 2020). "'He didn't have what it takes': Trump revels in Bloomberg's collapse". Politico. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  19. ^ Cadelago, Christopher (February 2, 2020). "Bloomberg camp mocks Trump's 'fake hair, his obesity, and his spray-on-tan". Politico. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  20. ^ Concha, Joe (October 1, 2018). "Katy Tur defends 'a few misplaced words' by Blumenthal about Vietnam service". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 1, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  21. ^ Everett, Burgess; Orr, Gabby (January 29, 2019). "Why Trump is still beefing with 'Da Nang Dick'". Politico. Archived from the original on December 9, 2020. Retrieved April 28, 2019.
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  26. ^ Schreckinger, Ben (January 14, 2016). "Carson makes a sleepy Carson joke". Politico. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  27. ^ Olson, Laura (August 3, 2018). "President Trump boosts Loouuuuu Barletta, blasts Sleeping Bob Casey at Wilkes-Barre rally". The Morning Call. Archived from the original on February 11, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
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  30. ^ Martin, Jeffery (January 30, 2020). "Trump Calls 'Crazy' Hillary Clinton 'So Easy,' Asks His Supporters If They Should 'Take Another Shot' at Her". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 31, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  31. ^ a b Chotiner, Isaac (June 1, 2016). "No, Donald Trump Is Not Good at Nicknames". Slate. Archived from the original on December 14, 2017. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  32. ^ Sherfinski, David (May 20, 2016). "Donald Trump floats 'Heartless Hillary' nickname for Clinton". The Washington Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2021. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  33. ^ Engel, Pamela (May 20, 2016). "Donald Trump is trying out a new nickname for Hillary Clinton". Business Insider. Archived from the original on December 16, 2017. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  34. ^ Rupert, Evelyn (June 2, 2016). "Trump reassigns 'Lyin'' nickname to Clinton". The Hill. Archived from the original on December 9, 2017. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  35. ^ Abadi, Mark (September 4, 2016). "Donald Trump is trying Ted Cruz's nickname on Hillary Clinton". Business Insider. Archived from the original on December 9, 2017. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  36. ^ Woolf, Nicky (October 20, 2016). "'Nasty woman': Trump attacks Clinton during final debate". The Guardian.
  37. ^ Sheth, Sonam (December 24, 2017). "Trump continues weekend-long Twitter tirade against deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe". Business Insider. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  38. ^ Feldscher, Kyle (March 18, 2018). "Trump accuses James Comey of lying under oath about anonymous sources". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
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  46. ^ Quinn, Melissa (October 6, 2018). "Trump mocks Feinstein over leak of letter accusing Kavanaugh of sexual assault". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on October 17, 2018. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  47. ^ Giaritelli, Anna (January 10, 2018). "Nancy Pelosi congratulates Dianne Feinstein on earning a Trump nickname: 'Clearly doing something right!'". The Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on January 10, 2018. Retrieved January 10, 2018.
  48. ^ Graef, Aileen (November 20, 2017). "Trump swipes at Flake on Twitter, calling his career 'toast'". CNN. Archived from the original on November 20, 2017. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  49. ^ Walker, Max (August 29, 2018). "President Trump congratulates McSally on nomination, takes swipe at Jeff Flake". KNXV-TV. Archived from the original on January 22, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
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  51. ^ East, Kirsten (November 16, 2017). "Trump chimes in on Franken sexual harassment, dubs him 'Al Frankenstein'". Politico. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  52. ^ Shelbourne, Mallory (December 12, 2017). "Trump says Gillibrand begged for donations 'and would do anything for them'". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 13, 2018. Retrieved August 12, 2018.
  53. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/aug/12/trump-kamala-harris-nasty
  54. ^ https://www.fastcompany.com/90539508/kamala-harris-is-bidens-vp-nominee-so-naturally-the-nasty-woman-meme-is-back
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