MRPL23

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MRPL23
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
Aliases MRPL23, L23MRP, RPL23, RPL23L, mitochondrial ribosomal protein L23
External IDs MGI: 1196612 HomoloGene: 7922 GeneCards: MRPL23
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE MRPL23 213897 s at fs.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_021134

NM_011288

RefSeq (protein)

NP_066957

NP_035418.1
NP_035418

Location (UCSC) Chr 11: 1.95 – 1.98 Mb Chr 7: 142.53 – 142.54 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse

39S ribosomal protein L23, mitochondrial is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MRPL23 gene.[3][4]

Function[edit]

Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are encoded by nuclear genes and help in protein synthesis within the mitochondrion. Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) consist of a small 28S subunit and a large 39S subunit. They have an estimated 75% protein to rRNA composition compared to prokaryotic ribosomes, where this ratio is reversed. Another difference between mammalian mitoribosomes and prokaryotic ribosomes is that the latter contain a 5S rRNA. Among different species, the proteins comprising the mitoribosome differ greatly in sequence, and sometimes in biochemical properties, which prevents easy recognition by sequence homology. This gene encodes a 39S subunit protein. The gene is biallelically expressed, despite its location within a region of imprinted genes on chromosome 11.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  2. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  3. ^ Tsang P, Gilles F, Yuan L, Kuo YH, Lupu F, Samara G, Moosikasuwan J, Goye A, Zelenetz AD, Selleri L (Feb 1996). "A novel L23-related gene 40 kb downstream of the imprinted H19 gene is biallelically expressed in mid-fetal and adult human tissues". Hum Mol Genet. 4 (9): 1499–507. doi:10.1093/hmg/4.9.1499. PMID 8541832. 
  4. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: MRPL23 mitochondrial ribosomal protein L23". 

Further reading[edit]

  • Sun XX, Dai MS, Lu H (2007). "5-fluorouracil activation of p53 involves an MDM2-ribosomal protein interaction". J. Biol. Chem. 282 (11): 8052–9. doi:10.1074/jbc.M610621200. PMID 17242401. 
  • Zhang Z, Gerstein M (2003). "Identification and characterization of over 100 mitochondrial ribosomal protein pseudogenes in the human genome". Genomics. 81 (5): 468–80. doi:10.1016/S0888-7543(03)00004-1. PMID 12706105. 
  • O'Brien TW (2002). "Evolution of a protein-rich mitochondrial ribosome: implications for human genetic disease". Gene. 286 (1): 73–9. doi:10.1016/S0378-1119(01)00808-3. PMID 11943462. 
  • Kenmochi N, Suzuki T, Uechi T, Magoori M, Kuniba M, Higa S, Watanabe K, Tanaka T (2001). "The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes: mapping of 54 genes to the chromosomes and implications for human disorders". Genomics. 77 (1–2): 65–70. doi:10.1006/geno.2001.6622. PMID 11543634. 
  • Suzuki T, Terasaki M, Takemoto-Hori C, Hanada T, Ueda T, Wada A, Watanabe K (2001). "Structural compensation for the deficit of rRNA with proteins in the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Systematic analysis of protein components of the large ribosomal subunit from mammalian mitochondria". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (24): 21724–36. doi:10.1074/jbc.M100432200. PMID 11279069.