Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1980s

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Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1980s
Aeroflot Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85396 ZRH 1982-6-20.png
A Tupolev Tu-154B-2 similar to the one involved in the crash of Flight 7425, occurred on 10 July 1985, is seen here on approach to Zurich Airport in 1982.

Following is a list of accidents and incidents experienced by Aeroflot during the 1980s. The deadliest accident the carrier experienced in this decade occurred in July 1985 (1985-07), when a Tupolev Tu-154B-2 stalled en route and crashed near Uchkuduk, then located in the Uzbek SSR, claiming the lives of all 200 occupants aboard the aircraft. The second deadliest accident the company went through in the decade took place in October 1984 (1984-10), when a Tupolev Tu-154B-1 hit snowplows upon landing at Omsk Airport, killing 174 of 179 people on board, plus four people on the ground. Both accidents combined left a death toll of 378 casualties and involved a Tupolev Tu-154, ranking as the worst ones involving the type, as of February 2012.[1]

There were 15 deadly accidents involving more than 50 people killed during this decade. The total number of fatalities for the decade rose to 2,092. When these figures are compared with the ones for the previous decade, the number of people killed aboard Aeroflot aircraft reduced by 1450. Given that most of the events took place within the borders of the Soviet Union, the table below includes hull-loss accidents for which the number of casualties was not published, a common practice during the Soviet era, as only those accidents that took place within the Soviet Union in which there were foreigners involved, or those that occurred outside the country tended to be published or admitted.[2]:32–34 Given this, the figures for the number of fatalities for the decade might be higher.

During the decade, the airline lost 152 aircraft, split into 8 Antonov An-12s, 47 Antonov An-2s, 10 Antonov An-24s, 9 Antonov An-26s, 1 Antonov An-28, 7 Ilyushin Il-14s, 2 Ilyushin Il-62s 1 Ilyushin Il-76, 18 Let L-410s, 1 Tupolev Tu-104, 15 Tupolev Tu-134s, 13 Tupolev Tu-154s, 18 Yakovlev Yak-40s, and 2 Yakovlev Yak-42s.

List[edit]

Date Location Aircraft Tail number Airline division Aircraft damage Fatalities Description Refs
1 March 1980 Soviet UnionOrenburg Tu-154A CCCP-85103 International W/O 0 Hard landing at Orenburg Airport. [3]
3 April 1980 Unknown An-2 CCCP-16027 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a forest. [4]
13 April 1980 Unknown An-2T CCCP-62479 Yakut W/O Unknown Both the fuselage and the wings sustained damage by the wheel studs when the aircraft performed a hard landing on its skis. [5]
14 April 1980 Soviet UnionKrasnoyarsk An-24B CCCP-47732 Krasnoyarsk W/O 2 Crashed while making a forced landing attempt, following the fracture of the starboard main undercarriage unit shortly after takeoff from Krasnoyarsk Airport. [6]
18 April 1980 Soviet UnionMoscow An-24B CCCP-46220 Moscow W/O Unknown Crashed upon takeoff at Bykovo Airport. [7]
12 June 1980 Soviet UnionOff Dushanbe Yak-40 CCCP-87689 Tajikistan W/O 29/29 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Leninabad–Dushanbe passenger service as Flight W-88 when it went off course and crashed into the slope of a mountain 44 kilometres (27 mi) northwest of Dushanbe Airport. [8][9][10]
7 July 1980 Soviet UnionAlma-Ata Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85355 Kazakhstan W/O 163/163 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Alma-Ata Airport when the airspeed suddenly dropped because of thermal currents it encountered during climbout. The airplane stalled, crashed, and caught fire. Was due to operate a domestic scheduled Alma-Ata–Simferopol passenger service as Flight 4227. [9][11][12]
18 July 1980 Soviet UnionArkhangelsk Yak-40 CCCP-87893[nb 1] Moscow W/O 0 Crash-landed near Arkhangelsk after the engines shut off on approach to an undisclosed airport. [13]
15 September 1980 Soviet UnionBereznik Il-14P CCCP-41831 Arkhangelsk W/O Unknown Crash-landed following asymmetric power on approach to Bereznik Airport. [14]
8 October 1980 Soviet UnionChita Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85321 Far East W/O 0 Inbound from Barnaul, the aircraft approached to Chita Airport well above the glideslope. Despite the flightcrew performing a steep descent, the aircraft made a long landing. The tail broke off as a consequence of the dive maneuver, and the landing gears sustained damaged as well. [15]
28 October 1980 AfghanistanKabul An-12B CCCP-11104 International W/O 6/6 Was operating the last leg of an international scheduled SofiaMineralnye VodyTashkent–Kabul passenger service as Flight 1531, when it crashed into mountainous terrain, after the flightcrew descended below the minimum safe altitude, in bad weather, on approach to Kabul Airport. [16]
6 January 1981 Soviet UnionSochi Tu-134A CCCP-65698 Latvia W/O 0 Brake failure on landing at Sochi Airport. [17]
7 February 1981 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-104A CCCP-42332 Unknown W/O 51/51[nb 2] Crashed upside down and caught fire soon after takeoff from Pushkin Airport, approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) south of Leningrad. Bound for Khabarovsk, the aircraft was due to operate a military service for the Soviet Navy. The cause of the accident was determined to be an uneven distribution of the passengers in their seats, as well as cargo not properly secured in the cargo hold, that shifted during takeoff. The combination of both effects placed the center of gravity of the airplane beyond its certified limits. High-ranking officers of the Pacific Fleet were aboard. [18][19]
18 February 1981 Unknown L-410M CCCP-67273 Yakut W/O Unknown Destroyed by a fire that broke out on the flight deck. [20]
28 April 1981 Soviet UnionLazo An-2TP CCCP-92864 Yakut W/O 12/12 Started to descend after encountering snow squall lines on its flight path at 1,500 metres (4,900 ft), while en route from Batagay to Lazo. During the descent the aircraft struck a mountain. [21]
21 May 1981 Unknown An-2 CCCP-35198 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a forest. [22]
13 June 1981 Soviet UnionUst-Barguzin Il-14M CCCP-41838 East Siberia W/O 48/48 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Ulan-UdeSeveromuysk passenger service as Flight 498. The planned course was abandoned due to bad weather, and the crew headed the airplane towards Ust-Barguzin. It crashed into mountainous terrain, 30 kilometres (19 mi) southwest of the new destination. This crash is the worst ever accident involving the Il-14. [23][24]
13 June 1981 Soviet UnionBratsk Tu-154 CCCP-85029 Moscow W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Bratsk Airport. [25]
13 June 1981 Soviet UnionSaldus An-2R CCCP-07712 Latvia W/O Unknown Hit an oil storage tank following loss of altitude due to an engine failure, crashing and burning. [26]
28 June 1981 Soviet UnionSimferopol Tu-134A CCCP-65871 Ukraine W/O 0 Experienced a burst tyre upon landing at Simferopol Airport, inbound from Kiev; the debris punctured a fuel tank, starting a fire. [27]
1 August 1981 Soviet UnionOstrov Utichiy Il-14M CCCP-91517 Magadan W/O 11/11 Crashed into the terrain in poor visibility conditions while en route on a MagadanKomsomolsk-on-Amur flight. [28]
24 August 1981 Soviet UnionOff Zavitinsk An-24RV CCCP-46653 Far East W/O 37 Was involved in a mid-air collision with a Soviet Air Force Tupolev Tu-16K. The commercial airliner was operating a domestic scheduled Komsomolsk-on-Amur–Blagoveshchensk passenger service as Flight 811 with 27 passengers and a crew of 5 aboard, when it collided with the military aircraft, that had 6 occupants on board, at an altitude of 17,000 feet (5,200 m), approximately 70 kilometres (43 mi) east of Zavitinsk. A single occupant of the An-26 survived the accident. [29][30]
29 August 1981 Soviet UnionZeya Yak-40 CCCP-87346 Far East W/O 3/34 Hit tree tops when it descended below the glideslope on approach to Zeya Airport amid poor weather, crashing, and catching fire. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled IrkutskChita–Zeya–Blagoveshchensk passenger service as Flight 674. [31][32]
16 September 1981 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-40523 Yakut W/O Unknown Landed on soft terrain and sank, breaking off the engine. [33]
18 September 1981 Soviet UnionZheleznogorsk-Ilimsky Yak-40 CCCP-87455 East Siberia W/O 40 The airplane was operating a domestic scheduled Irkutsk–Zheleznogorsk-Ilimsky passenger service as Flight In-652 with 33 occupants on board, when it collided in clouds, 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) away from its destination, with a Mi-8 that had 7 people aboard. All occupants from both aircraft perished in the accident. [34][35]
16 November 1981 Soviet UnionNorilsk Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85480 Krasnoyarsk W/O 99/167 Acquired excessive vertical speed and descended below the glideslope on approach to Norilsk Airport, inbound from Krasnoyarsk, crashing some 500 metres (1,600 ft) ahead of the runway. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled passenger service as Flight 3603. [36][37]
26 November 1981 Soviet UnionUst-Kulom An-2P CCCP-01808 Komi W/O 15/15 The aircraft were involved in a mid-air collision. The An-2P was operating a domestic scheduled Ust-Kulom–Syktyvkar passenger service with 12 passengers and 6 crewmembers on board, while the An-2TP was flying the opposite route. The airplanes collided at an altitude of 200 metres (660 ft) in a cloudy environment, 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) off Ust-Kulom. The first aircraft crashed into a wooden area, killing all occupants aboard; CCCP-40564 landed safely, only sustaining minor damage to one of its wings. [38][39]
An-2TP CCCP-40564 Repaired 0
18 December 1981 Soviet UnionDeputatskiy An-2TP CCCP-92858 Magadan W/O 0 Having departed from Chokurdah Airport, the crew lost their way as they flew the wrong heading in bad weather. The aircraft eventually ran out of fuel and force-landed 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) from Deputatskiy. [40]
23 December 1981 Soviet UnionYeniseysk An-26 CCCP-26505 Krasnoyarsk W/O 2 Crashed short of the runway on approach to Yeniseysk Airport. [41]
7 January 1982 Soviet UnionGelendzhik L-410M CCCP-67290 Georgia W/O 18/18 Crashed into a hill near Gelendzhik under unspecified circumstances. [42]
16 January 1982 Soviet UnionShevchenko Yak-40 CCCP-87902 Kazakhstan W/O 0/3 Belly-landed following fuel exhaustion. [43]
10 February 1982 Soviet UnionYakutsk L-410M CCCP-67237 Yakut W/O 0/0 While standing on the apron, probably at Yakutsk Airport, an An-2 that was carrying out an engine test ran into it. [44]
11 April 1982 Unknown An-2T CCCP-62489 Yakut W/O Unknown Sank when the frozen lake it was standing on broke. [45]
24 April 1982 Soviet UnionNovy Urengoy An-12B CCCP-11107 International W/O 0/7 Experienced the collapse of the nosegear during the take-off run at Novy Urengoy Airport, running off the runway and hitting an elevated taxiway. The main landing gear was sheared off during the incident, rupturing the fuel tanks, and causing a fire to break out. [46]
11 May 1982 East GermanySputendorf An-2R CCCP-07399 Ukraine W/O Unknown Crashed. [47]
31 May 1982 Soviet UnionDnepropetrovsk Yak-40 CCCP-87485 North Caucasus W/O 0/35 Overran the runway at Dnepropetrovsk Airport. [48]
28 June 1982 Soviet UnionMozyr Yak-42 CCCP-42529 Leningrad W/O 132/132 Crashed near Mozyr while en route, following the failure of the horizontal stabiliser jackscrew due to metal fatigue. The aircraft was operating a Leningrad–Kiev passenger service as Flight 8641. [49]
6 July 1982 Soviet UnionMoscow Il-62M CCCP-86513 International W/O 90/90 An apparent failure of both port engines arose moments after the aircraft got airborne, as indicated by the fire alarms in the cockpit. Both engines were shut down. Despite the crew's attempts to maintain altitude, the aircraft lost height and crashed 11.4 kilometres (7.1 mi) north of Sheremetyevo Airport. The airplane was due to operate an international scheduled Moscow–Dakar passenger service as Flight 411. It was later revealed that the fire alarms were false. [50][51]
16 July 1982 Unknown An-2 CCCP-15970 Yakut W/O Unknown Overturned on landing on a river bank, coming to rest upside down in the river. [52]
14 August 1982 Soviet UnionSukhumi Tu-134 CCCP-65836 Georgia W/O 0 Both aircraft were involved in a ground collision at Babushara Airport, when the outbound Tu-134 struck the L-410M that had just entered the active runway with 11 people aboard. All occupants of this latter aircraft perished in the accident. [53][54]
L-410M CCCP-67191 W/O 11/11
9 September 1982 Soviet UnionKhorezm An-2R CCCP-62663 Ukraine W/O 0/2 Forced landed in the Khorezm region following a loss of power, colliding with an embankment, breaking up, and catching fire. The aircraft was carrying out a crop spraying mission. [55]
29 September 1982 LuxembourgLuxembourg Il-62M CCCP-86470 International W/O 7/77[nb 3] Experienced a failure in one of the thrust reversers moments prior to touchdown at Findel Airport, causing the aircraft to yaw to the right, running off the runway, striking a building, sliding down a ravine, and eventually coming to rest 2,200 metres (7,200 ft) past the runway threshold. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled Moscow–Luxembourg–HavanaLima passenger service as Flight 343. [51][56]
16 December 1982 Soviet UnionSakanskoe An-24B CCCP-46567 Moscow W/O Unknown Forced-landed in a field. [57]
23 December 1982 Soviet UnionRostov-on-Don An-26 CCCP-26627 Turkmenistan W/O 16/16 The aircraft was operating a Sukhumi–Rostov-on-Don–Krasnovodsk cargo service. It crashed and was destroyed by fire shortly after takeoff from Rostov-on-Don Airport, after it hit trees during initial climbout. The airplane was overloaded. [58]
29 March 1983 Soviet UnionPoti L-410M CCCP-67190 Georgia W/O 6 Had a failure in one of its engines immediately after take-off from Poti Airport, and the propeller could not be feathered. Despite an attempted forced landing, the aircraft crashed into a hillside. It was due to operate a domestic scheduled Poti–Sukhumi passenger service. [59]
14 April 1983 Soviet UnionMinsk An-26 CCCP-26686 Belarus W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Minsk-1 Airport. [60]
19 April 1983 Soviet UnionLeninakan Yak-40 CCCP-87291 Armenia W/O 21/21 Went off course while en route from Nalchik to Leninakan as Flight E-46. It crashed into a mountain, 41 kilometres (25 mi) away from Leninakan Airport, after it was cleared to descend. [61][62]
17 June 1983 Soviet UnionGali Tu-134A CCCP-65657 Armenia W/O 0 Entered a zone of severe turbulence while en route from Lvov to Yerevan, approximately over Gali. The aircraft landed safely, though it was written off following the excessive stresses it underwent. [63]
29 June 1983 Soviet UnionKazarman Yak-40 CCCP-87808 Kyrgyzstan W/O 0 Crashed near Kazarman after it encountered windshear along its flightpath. [64]
5 July 1983 Soviet UnionLeningrad Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 Hijacking episode on a Moscow–Tallinn flight. [65]
30 August 1983 Soviet UnionOff Alma-Ata Tu-134A CCCP-65129 Privolzhsk W/O 90/90 The aircraft was in the last stages of a domestic scheduled KazanChelyabinsk–Alma-Ata passenger service as Flight 5463, when it crashed into mountainous terrain, in a premature descent, on approach to Alma-Ata Airport. [66][67][68]
19 October 1983 Soviet UnionKransk L-410UVP CCCP-67315 Krasnoyarsk W/O Unknown Overran the runway, hitting an obstacle. [69]
18 November 1983 Soviet UnionTbilisi Tu-134A CCCP-65807 Georgia W/O 8 The aircraft was hijacked while en route a Tbilisi–Leningrad passenger service. Some of the hijackers entered the flight deck opening fire as they tried to gain control of the aircraft, yet the crew performed violent maneuvers, eventually keeping the hijackers off the cockpit. The airplane landed safely at Tbilisi Airport and there were no casualties by then, but it was later stormed by security forces. Eight occupants —3 hijackers among them— were killed amid the gunfire. The deformation the airframe underwent during the sharp maneuvers exceeded the ones it could possibly withstand, causing it to be written off. [70]
24 December 1983 Soviet UnionLeshukonskoye An-24RV CCCP-46617 Arkhangelsk W/O 44/49 The aircraft that was covering the Arkhangelsk–Leshukonskoye route as Flight 601, crashed ahead of the runway threshold on final approach to Leshukonskoye Airport, while attempting a go-around. [71][72]
1984 Soviet UnionMinsk Tu-134A CCCP-65095 Belarus W/O 0/0 Destroyed by fire in a maintenance facility at Minsk-1 Airport. [73]
28 January 1984 Soviet UnionIzhevsk An-24RV CCCP-47310 Ural W/O 4/53 Crash-landed at Izhevsk Airport when the pilot attempted to land the aircraft with a failure on one of the elevators due to a maintenance error. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kuybyshev-Izhevsk passengers service as Flight 923. [74]
11 February 1984 AngolaCuenca Sul An-12 Unknown Unknown W/O Unknown Shot down by rebels. [75]
16 February 1984 Soviet UnionSaaremaa Il-14M CCCP-91611 Leningrad W/O Unknown The aircraft was operating a research flight, when a failure on the starboard engine occurred. The captain decided to ditch it in the Irbe Strait. [76]
23 February 1984 Soviet UnionTiksi An-2T CCCP-44910 Yakut W/O 0/0 Damaged by a storm while standing at Tiksi Airport. [77]
6 May 1984 Soviet UnionStaroye Zhookovo An-2M CCCP-05918 Central W/O Unknown The aircraft was performing a crop spraying mission when an excessive deflection of the elevator caused it to crash northwest of Staroye Zhookovo, catching fire. [78]
14 July 1984 Soviet UnionKrasnodar Krai An-2R CCCP-40827 North Caucasus W/O 2/3 Crashed while performing a crop spraying mission. [79]
24 July 1984 Soviet UnionKrasnoselkap An-26B CCCP-26009 Tyumen W/O Unknown Runway overrun. [80]
24 July 1984 Soviet UnionLazurnoye An-2T CCCP-82909 Ukraine W/O 0 Long landing at Lazurnoye Airport, inbound from Krivoy Rog. Overshot the runway and collided with obstacles. [81]
11 October 1984[nb 4] Soviet UnionOmsk Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85243 East Siberia W/O 178 Hit two snowplows upon landing in poor visibility at Omsk Airport, inbound from Krasnodar as Flight 3352, and caught fire.[nb 5] There were 179 people aboard, of whom 174 lost their lives in the accident; there were also 4 casualties on the ground. [82][83]
4 December 1984 Soviet UnionKostroma L-410MA CCCP-67225 Central W/O 10/10 Crashed near Kostroma while en route a domestic scheduled passenger service. [84]
23 December 1984 Soviet UnionKrasnoyarsk Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85338 Krasnoyarsk W/O 110/111 Had a failure in one of its engines shortly after takeoff from Krasnoyarsk Airport; it caught fire, yet the flight engineer shut down the incorrect one. The fire propagated to the empennage, making the aircraft uncontrollable just before it could land safely. It was due to operate a domestic scheduled Krasnoyarsk–Irkutsk passenger service as Flight 3519. [85][86]
29 December 1984 Soviet UnionOff Astrakhan L-410UVP CCCP-67140 North Caucasus W/O Unknown Force-landed 76 kilometres (47 mi) away from Astrakhan. [87]
1 February 1985 Soviet UnionMinsk Tu-134AK CCCP-65910 Belarus W/O 58/80 Crashed during initial climbout, 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) away from Minsk-2 International Airport, because of flameout of both engines, which had ingested ice during the takeoff run. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Minsk–Leningrad passenger service as Flight 7841. [88]
25 March 1985 Unknown An-2T CCCP-44905 Yakut W/O Unknown Landed on a frozen river. [89]
3 May 1985 Soviet UnionZolochiv Tu-134A CCCP-65856 Estonia W/O 94/94 The Tu-134A was minutes away from completing a domestic scheduled Tallinn–Lvov passenger service as Flight 8381 with 79 people aboard, On approach to Sknyliv Airport, it was involved in a mid-air, head-on collision with a Soviet Air Force Antonov An-26, that was carrying 15 people on board and had departed the same airport. The collision occurred over Zolochiv at an approximate altitude of 13,000 feet (4,000 m), killing all occupants from both aircraft. [90][91][92]
An-26 CCCP-26492 N/A W/O
21 May 1985 Soviet UnionTadibeyakha An-2 CCCP-04326 Tyumen W/O 0/20 Could not gain altitude after takeoff, lost speed, and crash-landed. The aircraft had ten illegal passengers on board. [93]
29 May 1985 Soviet UnionRzhevka An-2R CCCP-70218 Northern W/O Unknown Crashed near Rzhevka Airport during a test flight. [94]
10 June 1985 Soviet UnionStavropol Krai An-2R CCCP-32028 Uzbekistan W/O 2/3 Lost speed and crashed in the Stavropol Krai after the pilot tried to gain altitude and the aircraft banked steeply. Was performing a crop spraying mission. [95]
20 June 1985 Soviet UnionMoma An-2TP CCCP-91783 Yakut W/O 0 Crash-landed shortly after takeoff from Moma Airport, as it could not gain altitude because of overloading. [96]
4 July 1985 Soviet UnionBaykit An-2R CCCP-55710 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 Departed overloaded from Baykit Airport. The flightcrew attempted to return to the airport as the aircraft was unable to gain altitude, yet it crash-landed before reaching the airfield. [97]
10 July 1985 Soviet UnionUchkuduk Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85311 Uzbekistan W/O 200/200 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Tashkent–KarshiOrenburg–Leningrad passenger service as Flight 7425. It crashed near Uchkuduk while en route its second leg, when the crew mistook in-flight vibrations due to low airspeed with engine surges and reduced power, leading to an even lower airspeed that eventually stalled the aircraft. This crash is the worst ever accident involving the Tu-154. [98]
1 September 1985 Unknown An-2P CCCP-01789 Yakut W/O Unknown Force-landed following an engine failure. [99]
11 October 1985 Soviet UnionOff Kutaisi Yak-40 CCCP-87803 Georgia W/O 14/14 Crashed into mountainous terrain, 97 kilometres (60 mi) west of Kutaisi, when it was flying at a low altitude in bad weather, following air traffic controllers indications. It was operating a domestic scheduled Kutaisi–Poti passenger service as Flight D-7. [100][101]
14 October 1985 Soviet UnionUst-Maya L-410M CCCP-67264 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a river shortly after takeoff from Ust-Maya Airport. [102]
1986 Soviet UnionMoscow Yak-42 CCCP-42536 Central W/O 0 Destroyed by fire ignited by a thunderflash while standing at Bykovo Airport. The aircraft was being used by security forces for training purposes. [103]
6 February 1986 Soviet UnionSaransk An-26B CCCP-26095 Belarus W/O 0/6 Crashed and broke up shortly after takeoff from Saransk Airport, when the captain mistook the localizer and inner marker beacon red lights with the anti-collision lights of an incoming aircraft, performing a violent evasive maneuver and losing control of the airplane. [104]
17 February 1986 AntarcticaPhilippi Glacier Il-14M CCCP-41816 Central W/O 6/6 Ran out of fuel as it encountered stronger-than-expected headwinds while flying a cargo service within Antarctica between the Molodezhnaya Station and the Mirny Station, crashing into the slope of the Philippi Glacier when attempting an emergency landing under whiteout conditions. [105]
2 March 1986 Soviet UnionBugulma An-24B CCCP-46423 Moscow W/O 38/38 Crashed on approach to Bugulma Airport, inbound from Cheboksary as Flight F-77, following the feathering of one of the propellers. [106][107]
30 March 1986 Soviet UnionGraham Bell Island Il-14 CCCP-04117 Unknown W/O Unknown Hit packed snow on takeoff. [108]
18 April 1986 Soviet UnionKazan Yak-40 CCCP-87236 Privolzhsk W/O Unknown Structural failure at Kazan Airport. [109]
13 May 1986 Soviet UnionLedovaya Baza An-12TB CCCP-12962 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 Sank when the ice surface it was being towed over for repairs cracked. [110]
17 May 1986 Soviet UnionOff Khanty-Mansiysk Yak-40 CCCP-87928 Yakut W/O 5/5 A test was being run following undercarriage repairs. During a pullout, the left wing broke off and its debris struck the tail, which broke off as well, causing the aircraft to crash 19 kilometres (12 mi) away from Khanty-Mansiysk. [111]
21 May 1986 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85327 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 The flightcrew forgot to turn on the heating system of the pitot tube prior to takeoff from Chelyabinsk, and that condition persisted all the way to Moscow. Due to icing on the approach to Domodedovo Airport, the crew increased power as they mistakenly assumed the plane was about to stall due to incorrect speed readings. Despite the landing being performed at a higher-than-normal speed, the crew managed to land the plane safely. The airframe sustained major damage because of the stresses it underwent on the descent. [112]
6 June 1986 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-29348 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a forest. [113]
22 June 1986 Soviet UnionPenza Tu-134A CCCP-65142 Privolzhsk W/O 1/59 Aborted takeoff at Penza Airport, ending up in a ravine. A passenger died from a heart attack. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Penza–Simferopol passenger service. [114]
2 July 1986 Soviet UnionKopsa Tu-134AK CCCP-65120 Komi W/O 54/92 Crashed 75 kilometres (47 mi) southwest of Syktyvkar after it hit trees when attempting a forced landing due to a fire in the cargo hold. The aircraft was due to operate a domestic scheduled Vorkuta-Syktyvkar–Moscow passenger service as Flight 2306. [115]
11 July 1986 Unknown An-2R CCCP-70124 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a forest. [116]
11 August 1986 Soviet UnionKonder Mountain An-2R CCCP-40902 Unknown W/O 2/4 One of the wings struck trees when the pilot was maneuvering the aircraft to drop off mail. [117]
9 October 1986 Soviet UnionTiksi An-2R CCCP-02592 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a hillside while en route from Taimilir to Tiksi. [118]
20 October 1986 Soviet UnionKuybyshev Tu-134A CCCP-65766 North Caucasus W/O 70/92 Skidded off the runway following a hard landing at Kuybyshev Airport, broke up, and caught fire. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Sverdlovsk-Kuybyshev service as Flight 6502. [119]
12 December 1986 East GermanyBerlin Tu-134A CCCP-65795 Belarus W/O 72/82 Hit trees on approach to Schönefeld Airport, inbound from Minsk, and crashed. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled passenger service as Flight 892. [120]
31 December 1986 Soviet UnionChernenko L-410UVP CCCP-67428 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 Ran off the apron. [121]
16 January 1987 Soviet UnionTashkent Yak-40 CCCP-87618 Uzbekistan W/O 9/9 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Yuzhny Airport as it encountered a wake vortex generated by the departure of an Ilyushin Il-76 moments before. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Tashkent–Shahrisabz passenger service as Flight 505. [122]
25 January 1987 Soviet UnionLeningrad Yak-40 CCCP-87696 Northern W/O Unknown Crashed shortly after takeoff from Pulkovo Airport, following an uncontrollable turn. [123]
7 February 1987 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk An-12TB CCCP-11378 Magadan W/O Unknown Written off at Sverdlovsk Airport under unspecified circumstances. [124]
6 March 1987 Soviet UnionOff Alma-Ata An-26 CCCP-26007 Tajikistan W/O 9/9 Struck a 2,370-metre (7,780 ft) high mountain, 56 kilometres (35 mi) away from Alma-Ata, soon after it departed from Alma-Ata Airport for a cargo service. [125]
24 April 1987 Unknown An-2 CCCP-62566 Yakut W/O Unknown Sank when the ice of a frozen lake the aircraft had landed on broke. [126]
23 May 1987 Soviet UnionKhandyga An-26 CCCP-26567 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed short of the runway. [127]
27 May 1987 SwedenVisby An-2R CCCP-70501 Latvia W/O 0/1 The aircraft was stolen by a pilot seeking political asylum, who flew the airplane from Saldus to Sweden, and ditched it off Visby. [128]
13 June 1987 Unknown L-410M CCCP-67239 Yakut W/O Unknown Involved in a ground accident alongside two other aircraft. [129]
19 June 1987 Soviet UnionBerdyansk Yak-40 CCCP-87826 Ukraine W/O 8/29 Overran the runway following an aborted go-around at Berdyansk Airport, hit obstacles and caught fire. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Odessa-Berdyansk service as Flight 528. [130]
20 July 1987 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-40556 Yakut W/O Unknown Main undercarriage broke off upon landing. [131]
21 July 1987 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-02763 Yakut W/O Unknown Crash-landed on a farm field. [132]
23 July 1987 Soviet UnionIvanovo Tu-134A-3 CCCP-65874 Ukraine W/O Unknown Unknown [133]
14 August 1987 Soviet UnionUst-Nem An-28 CCCP-28741 Komi W/O 0 Hard landing. [134]
28 August 1987 Soviet UnionAlisovo An-2 Unknown Ukraine W/O 0/2 Lost power on takeoff and force-landed in a ravine. [135]
7 September 1987 Soviet UnionOmsk An-12TB CCCP-12971 Magadan W/O Unknown Unknown [136]
24 September 1987 Soviet UnionYakutsk L-410MU CCCP-67249 Yakut W/O 0 Aborted takeoff at Yakutsk Airport. [137]
18 October 1987 Soviet UnionSaratov L-410UVP CCCP-67334 Privolzhsk W/O 0 Belly landing at Saratov Airport. [138]
15 December 1987 Soviet UnionPyatigorsk An-2R CCCP-06324 North Caucasus W/O Unknown Crashed. [139]
18 January 1988 Soviet UnionKrasnovodsk Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85254 Turkmenistan W/O 11/143[nb 6] The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Moscow–Krasnovodsk passenger service as Flight 699. A hard landing at Krasnovodsk Airport caused the empennage to separate from the airframe, which also broke up. [140][141][142]
24 January 1988 Soviet UnionNizhnevartovsk Yak-40 CCCP-87549 Privolzhsk W/O 27/31 Port and starboard engines failed on takeoff from Nizhnevartovsk Airport, causing the aircraft to lose speed during the initial climbout, eventually stalling, losing altitude, and hitting obstacles before the airframe broke up. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Nizhnevartovsk–Tyumen passenger service as Flight 29674. [140][143][144]
26 February 1988 Unknown An-2R CCCP-01648 Yakut W/O Unknown Unknown [145]
27 February 1988 Soviet UnionSurgut Tu-134AK CCCP-65675 Belarus W/O 20/51 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Tyumen–Surgut passenger service as Flight 7867. It performed a hard landing at Surgut Airport, broke up and caught fire. [140][146][147]
8 March 1988 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85413 East Siberia W/O 9[nb 7] The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled Irkutsk–Leningrad passenger service as when it was hijacked by a family who demanded to be flown to the United Kingdom. Russian troops stormed the airplane while making a refuelling stop at Pulkovo Airport. As a result, five of the hijackers were killed, along with three passengers and an air hostess. The airframe sustained major damages on its empennage during the raid, and was written off. [148][149]
19 April 1988[nb 8] Soviet UnionBagdarin L-410UVP CCCP-67518 East Siberia W/O 17/17 Struck a hill in a blizzard, near Bagdarin, while en route a domestic scheduled Muya–Bagdarin passenger service. [150][151]
19 April 1988 Soviet UnionUlan-Ude L-410UVP CCCP-67431 East Siberia W/O Unknown Crashed at Ulan-Ude Airport. [152]
9 June 1988 Soviet UnionTobolsk An-2R CCCP-70121 Tyumen W/O 2/2 Crashed and caught fire, 15.4 kilometres (9.6 mi) away from Tobolsk, after it struck the top of a chimney. [153]
12 June 1988 Soviet UnionAleksandriya An-2TP CCCP-32267 Ukraine W/O 0/15 Forced-landed after engine flameout due to ingestion of rain as the aircraft entered a thunderstorm while en route from Rovno to Vladimirets. [154]
8 July 1988 Soviet UnionKhabarovsk An-24RV CCCP-46669 Far East W/O Unknown Collided with buildings after it overran the runway on takeoff from Khabarovsk Airport. [155]
9 July 1988 Unknown An-2P CCCP-07791 Central W/O 0 Struck the ground after the pilot unintentionally moved the steering wheel. [156]
22 July 1988 Unknown An-2 Unknown Unknown W/O 0 Lost control when it entered a turbulence region at low altitude. [157]
12 August 1988 Unknown An-2R CCCP-35677 Ukraine W/O 0 Crash-landed minutes after takeoff following fuel exhaustion. [158]
26 August 1988 Soviet UnionKystatyam An-2P CCCP-01788 Yakut W/O 1/4 Crashed near Kystatyam while operating a survey flight along the Lena River. [159]
26 August 1988 Soviet UnionIrkutsk L-410MU CCCP-67235 Yakut W/O 4/4 Crashed into the slope of a mountain during approach to Irkutsk Airport, breaking up and catching fire. It was operating a domestic non-scheduled Kirensk–Irkutsk passenger service. [160]
21 September 1988 Soviet UnionAiykam An-2TP CCCP-70848 Far East W/O 2/2 Struck a 1,350-metre (4,430 ft) high mountain, 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of Aiykam. [161]
24 September 1988 SyriaAleppo Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85479 Armenia W/O 0/168 Had an undisclosed landing gear collapse when it hard-landed at Aleppo Airport, overrunning the runway. The center of gravity of the aircraft was off the limits. It was operating an international scheduled Yerevan–Aleppo passenger service. [162]
24 September 1988 Unknown An-2R CCCP-84657 Yakut W/O Unknown Crash-landed on a river bed. [163]
4 October 1988 Soviet UnionBatagay An-12BP CCCP-11418 Yakut W/O 6/6 Crashed into a mountain on approach to Batagay Airport, 25 kilometres (16 mi) off the city. The aircraft was operating a cargo service inbound from Tiksi. [164]
10 October 1988 Unknown An-2R CCCP-32612 Yakut W/O Unknown Emergency landing on rough terrain. [165]
31 October 1988 Soviet UnionBelaya Gora An-2TP CCCP-32325 Yakut W/O Unknown Hard landing. [166]
7 December 1988 Soviet UnionKodinsk L-410UVP CCCP-67127 Krasnoyarsk W/O 6/14 Crashed when it struck the ground on approach to Kodinsk, inbound from Krasnoyarsk on a domestic scheduled passenger service. [167]
13 January 1989 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk An-12B CCCP-12997 Ural W/O 0 Both starboard engines jammed at full power shortly after takeoff from Koltsovo Airport. The crew decided to return to the airport of departure; following touchdown, the aircraft burst into flames after bouncing and groundlooping. [168]
13 January 1989 LiberiaMonrovia Tu-154S CCCP-85067 International W/O 0 Failed to get airborne on takeoff from Roberts International Airport, overrunning the runway and ending up in a ditch. The aircraft was overloaded and cargo not properly secured shifted on takeoff, putting its center of gravity beyond the forward limits. Due to operate a Monrovia–Bamako cargo service. [169]
1 May 1989 Soviet UnionSechenovo An-2R CCCP-70225 Privolzhsk W/O 5/5 Crashed while it was taking part in a Labour Day demonstration. [170]
11 May 1989 Soviet UnionBrest An-2R CCCP-54891 Belarus W/O Unknown Crashed. [171]
14 August 1989 Soviet UnionNeryungri Yak-40 CCCP-88252 Yakut W/O 0 Landed in crosswind conditions on a wet runway at Neryungri Airport, inbound from Chita as Flight 432. [172]
6 July 1989 Soviet UnionCape Schmidt Il-14M CCCP-61788 Yakut W/O 0 Ditched in shallow waters following loss of power in one of the engines shortly after takeoff from Mys Shmidta Airport. Due to operate an ice reconnaissance flight. [173]
19 July 1989 Soviet UnionTalovrow Island An-26 CCCP-26685 Yakut W/O 10/10 The aircraft was on a survey flight along the shore of the East Siberian Sea, from Cape Schmidt to Pevek Airport, when one of its wings hit coastal cliffs, causing it to crash. [174]
28 August 1989 Soviet UnionLabinsk L-410UVP CCCP-67104 North Caucasus W/O Unknown Forced landing. [175]
2 September 1989 Soviet UnionBishkek Yak-40 CCCP-87509 Kyrgyzstan W/O 0 Belly landed at Bishkek Airport. [176]
15 September 1989 Soviet UnionDzhalal-Abad Yak-40 CCCP-87391 Kyrgyzstan W/O Unknown Bounced several times upon landing. [177]
4 October 1989 Soviet UnionStepnogorsk An-24RV CCCP-46525 Kazakhstan W/O 0/51 Overran the runway on landing and hit a concrete mast. [178]
20 October 1989 Soviet UnionLeninakan Il-76TD CCCP-76466 Central W/O 25/25 Crashed into the terrain on approach to Leninakan Airport, following an erroneous instrument setting on the aircraft, barometric altimeter. It was operating a cargo service between Ulyanovsk and Leninakan. [179]
21 November 1989 Soviet UnionTyumen An-24B CCCP-46335 Ural W/O 34/42 The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Perm–Tyumen passenger service as Flight 37577, when it collided with trees on approach to Tyumen Airport and crashed. [180][181]
14 December 1989 Unknown An-2 Unknown Unknown W/O 1/12 Crashed in foggy conditions. [182]

See also[edit]


Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ This is a dubious registration, as it is out of sequence for an aircraft of the type.[13]
  2. ^ The number of fatalities for this accident are in dispute. Depending upon the source, the death toll ranges from 51,[18] to 73.[19]
  3. ^ Figures for the actual number of occupants differ by one passenger; there is also a discrepancy over the date of occurrence by one day.[51][56]
  4. ^ There is a discrepancy over the date of occurrence, as it was claimed it happened on 11 October,[82] or 15 October.[83]
  5. ^ It was also stated that one of the vehicles the aircraft hit was a fuel bowser.[83]
  6. ^ There exists a discrepancy over the number of occupants aboard the aircraft, as it was also informed to be 104.[140]
  7. ^ The number of fatalities for this hijacking episode vary, ranging from four,[148] to nine.[149]
  8. ^ There is a difference of a week in the date of occurrence depending upon the source.[150][151]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Accident record for the Tupolev Tu-154". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  2. ^ "World airline safety audit" (PDF). Flight International: 29 – 34. 26 January 1985. Retrieved 19 February 2012. "For Aeroflot we can list only those accidents which reached the ears of Western reporters, either because foreign nationals were killed or because the accident occurred outside the Soviet Union. We do not know how many Aeroflot accidents have occurred in total." 
  3. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85103 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  4. ^ Accident description for CCCP-16027 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  5. ^ Accident description for CCCP-62479 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  6. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47732 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2012.
  7. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46220 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  8. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87689 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2012.
  9. ^ a b "Flight safety: 1980 reviewed – Fatal accidents: scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 228. 24 January 1981. Retrieved 16 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Таджикского РПО ГА близ Душанбе" [Accident Yak-40 near Dushanbe] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  11. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85355 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  12. ^ "Accidents" (PDF). Flight International: 228. 26 July 1980. Retrieved 20 January 2012. "All 163 passengers and crew aboard an Aeroflot airliner were killed when it crashed near the Asian city of Alma Ata at the beginning of a flight to Simferpol [sic], 1,500 miles away in the Crimea, on July 7." 
  13. ^ a b Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.[dead link]
  14. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41831 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  15. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85321 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  16. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11104 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2012.
  17. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65698 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 January 2012.
  18. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-42332 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  19. ^ a b "Safety update..." (PDF). Flight International: 547. 28 February 1981. Retrieved 20 January 2012. "During the weekend February 7–8 an Aeroflot Tupolev Tu-104 crashed on take-off from Leningrad, killing 73 people, according to unconfirmed reports. Senior naval officers of the Soviet Pacific fleet were among those killed." 
  20. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67273 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  21. ^ Accident description for CCCP-92864 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  22. ^ Accident description for CCCP-35198 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  23. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41838 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
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  25. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85029 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  26. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07712 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  27. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65871 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 January 2012.
  28. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91517 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  29. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46653 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  30. ^ "Столкновение Ан-24РВ ДВ УГА и Ту-16К в районе Завитинска" [Collision An-24RV and Tu-16K Zavitinsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  31. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87346 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  32. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 ДВ УГА в а/п Зея" [Accident Yak-40 Zeya] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  33. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40523 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 January 2012.
  34. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87455 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  35. ^ "Столкновение Як-40 и Ми-8 ВС УГА в районе г.Железногорск-Илимский" [Collision Yak-40 and Mi-8 Zheleznogorsk-Ilimsky] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  36. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85480 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  37. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-154Б-2 Красноярского УГА в а/п Норильск (Алыкель)" [Accident Tu-154B-2 Norilsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  38. ^ Accident description for CCCP-01808 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  39. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40564 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 January 2012.
  40. ^ Accident description for CCCP-92858 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 January 2012.
  41. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26505 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 January 2012.
  42. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67290 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  43. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87902 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 January 2012.
  44. ^ Incident description for CCCP-67237 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 January 2012.
  45. ^ Accident description for CCCP-62489 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  46. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11107 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 January 2012.
  47. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07399 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  48. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87485 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  49. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42529 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  50. ^ Accident description for CCCP-86513 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  51. ^ a b c "Airline flight safety: 1982 reviewed – FATAL ACCIDENTS: SCHEDULED PASSENGER FLIGHTS". Flight International: 205. 22 January 1983. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  52. ^ Accident description for CCCP-15970 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  53. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65836 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  54. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67191 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  55. ^ Accident description for CCCP-62663 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 January 2012.
  56. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-86470 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 September 2011.
  57. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46567 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  58. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26627 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 January 2012.
  59. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67190 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  60. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26686 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  61. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87291 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  62. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Армянского УГА близ Ленинакана" [Accident Yak-40 near Leninakan] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  63. ^ Incident description for CCCP-65657 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  64. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87808 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 February 2012.
  65. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  66. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65129 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  67. ^ "Airline flight safety: 1983 reviewed – Fatal accidents: scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 286. 28 January 1984. Retrieved 19 February 2012. 
  68. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-134А Казанского ОАО в районе Алма-Аты" [Accident Tu-134A Alma-Ata] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  69. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67315 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 February 2012.
  70. ^ Hijacking description for CCCP-65807 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 February 2012.
  71. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46617 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 January 2012.
  72. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24РВ Архангельского ОАО в районе а/п Лешуконское" [Accident An-24RV Leushukonskoye] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  73. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65095 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  74. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47310 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 August 2014.
  75. ^ Incident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  76. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91611 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  77. ^ Accident description for CCCP-44910 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  78. ^ Accident description for CCCP-05918 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  79. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40827 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  80. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26009 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  81. ^ Accident description for CCCP-82909 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  82. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-85243 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  83. ^ a b c "Commercial flight safety: 1984 reviewed – Fatal accidents: scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 35. 26 January 1985. Retrieved 19 February 2012. 
  84. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67225 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  85. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85338 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  86. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-154Б-2 Красноярского УГА в районе г.Красноярск" [Accident Tu-154B-2 Krasnoyarsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  87. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67140 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  88. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65910 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 March 2014.
  89. ^ Accident description for CCCP-44905 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  90. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65856 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 February 2012.
  91. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26492 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 February 2012.
  92. ^ "Столкновение Ту-134А Эстонского УГА с Ан-26 ВВС в районе г.Золочев" [Tu-134A and An-26 collision Zolochiv] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  93. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04326 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  94. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70218 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  95. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32028 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 February 2012.
  96. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91783 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  97. ^ Accident description for CCCP-55710 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  98. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85311 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 February 2012.
  99. ^ Accident description for CCCP-01789 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  100. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87803 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 February 2012.
  101. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Грузинского УГА близ Миха-Цхакая (Сенаки)" [Accident Yak-40 Kutaisi] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 29 August 2012. 
  102. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67264 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  103. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42536 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2012.
  104. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26095 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  105. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41816 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  106. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46423 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2012.
  107. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Быковского ОАО близ Бугульмы" [Accident An-24B Bugulma] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 29 August 2012. 
  108. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04117 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  109. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87236 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  110. ^ Incident description for CCCP-12962 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  111. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87928 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2012.
  112. ^ Incident description for CCCP-85327 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  113. ^ Accident description for CCCP-29348 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  114. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65142 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2011.
  115. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65120 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2012.
  116. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70124 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 August 2014.
  117. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40902 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  118. ^ Accident description for CCCP-02592 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  119. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65766 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 February 2012.
  120. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65795 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 February 2012.
  121. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67428 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 February 2012.
  122. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87618 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 February 2012.
  123. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87696 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  124. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11378 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  125. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26007 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 February 2012.
  126. ^ Accident description for CCCP-62566 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  127. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26567 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  128. ^ Incident description for CCCP-70501 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  129. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67239 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  130. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87826 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 February 2012.
  131. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40556 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  132. ^ Accident description for CCCP-02763 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  133. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65874 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  134. ^ Accident description for CCCP-28741 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  135. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  136. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12971 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  137. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67249 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  138. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67334 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  139. ^ Accident description for CCCP-06324 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 February 2012.
  140. ^ a b c d "Commercial flight safety – Fatal accidents: scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 51. 21 January 1989. Retrieved 18 February 2012. 
  141. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85254 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  142. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-154Б-1 Ашхабадского ОАО в а/п Красноводск" [Accident Tu-154B-1 Krasnovodsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  143. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87549 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  144. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Приволжского УГА в районе Нижневартовска" [Accident Yak-40 near Nizhnevartovsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  145. ^ Accident description for CCCP-01648 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
  146. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65675 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  147. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-134А Белорусского УГА в а/п Сургут" [Accident Tu-134 Surgut] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 29 August 2012. 
  148. ^ a b "Commercial flight safety – Fatal occurrences involving sabotage, hijacking, or military action against civilian targets" (PDF). Flight International: 51. 21 January 1989. Retrieved 18 February 2012. 
  149. ^ a b Hijacking description for CCCP-85413 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  150. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-67518 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  151. ^ a b "Commercial flight safety – Fatal accidents: regional and commuter operations" (PDF). Flight International: 51. 21 January 1989. Retrieved 18 February 2012. 
  152. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67431 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  153. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70121 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  154. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32267 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  155. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46669 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  156. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07791 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
  157. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  158. ^ Accident description for CCCP-35677 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  159. ^ Accident description for CCCP-01788 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  160. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67235 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  161. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70848 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  162. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85479 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  163. ^ Accident description for CCCP-84657 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  164. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11418 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  165. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32612 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 February 2012.
  166. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32325 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
  167. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67127 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 February 2012.
  168. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12997 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
  169. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85067 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
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  175. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67104 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
  176. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87509 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
  177. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87391 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 February 2012.
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  180. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46335 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 February 2012.
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