Masonic Home Independent School District

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Masonic Home Independent School District
Masonic Widows and Orphans District.jpg
Masonic Home and School of Texas
Address
3600 Wichita Street

United States
Coordinates32°42′32″N 97°16′46″W / 32.70889°N 97.27944°W / 32.70889; -97.27944Coordinates: 32°42′32″N 97°16′46″W / 32.70889°N 97.27944°W / 32.70889; -97.27944
District information
GradesK-12
Established1913
Closed2005 (dissolved)
Other information
Merged intoFort Worth ISD
NotesSchool district for orphans, of notable historical interest
WebsiteMasonic Home and School of Texas - History
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District is located in Texas
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District is located in the United States
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District
Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District
LocationRoughly bounded by E. Berry St., Mitchell Blvd., Vaughn St., Wichita St. and Glen Garden Dr.,
Fort Worth, Texas
Area206 acres (83 ha)
Built1910 (1910)
ArchitectWiley G. Clarkson, Herbert M. Greene
Architectural styleLate Gothic Revival
NRHP reference #91002022[1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 28, 1992

The Masonic Home and School of Texas was a home for widows and orphans in what is now Fort Worth, Texas from 1889 to 2005. The first superintendent was Dr. Frank Rainey of Austin, Texas.[2] Starting in 1913, it had its own school system, the Masonic Home Independent School District.[3][4]

The campus included buildings designed by architects Wiley G. Clarkson of Fort Worth and Herbert M. Greene of Dallas, and it was listed in the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district in 1992.[2]

Early history[edit]

In 1889, the Masons opened a home for widows and orphans of Masons. Later, widows moved to a location in nearby Arlington (closed nearly a century later during the construction of Cowboys Stadium) and the home was opened to non-Masonic orphans. On January 10, 1913, under laws passed in 1905 allowing orphanages to organize their own schools, the Texas State Board of Education created the Masonic Home Independent School District.[3][4]

Football glory[edit]

Its 1930s football teams are the subject a 2007 book by Jim Dent, Twelve Mighty Orphans.[5] In 1995, the Masonic Home won the Class 1A State Football Championship in Groesbeck, Tx. under the coaches Tom Hines and Arthur (Buster) Bone, also an ex-student.

Later years[edit]

The school closed in 2005 due to lack of funding. The school district merged with the Fort Worth Independent School District and the buildings and grounds were sold to a private developer.[4] The school's chapel is now a private facility known as the Bell Tower Chapel, a popular wedding location.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. November 2, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Masonic Home and School of Texas Historic Marker". 1999. Retrieved 2008-10-23.
  3. ^ a b Neeley, Shirley, J.Closing of Masonic Home Independent School District Archived 2009-03-25 at the Wayback Machine, Texas Education Agency, retrieved 2008-04-10
  4. ^ a b c Masonic Home and School of Texas - History, retrieved 2008-04-10 Archived March 24, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Dent, Jim, Twelve Mighty Orphans: The Inspiring True Story of the Mighty Mites Who Ruled Texas Football, 2007, ISBN 0-312-30872-8. Amazon.com, books.google.com, links retrieved 2008-04-10
  6. ^ http://www.belltowerfortworth.com/

External links[edit]