2005 in spaceflight

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2005 in spaceflight
Final Titan IV launch.jpg
Launch of the last Titan rocket, a Titan IVB, from Vandenberg SLC-4E
Orbital launches
First 12 January
Last 29 December
Total 55
Successes 52
Failures 3
Partial failures 0
Catalogued 52
National firsts
Satellite  Iran
Rockets
Maiden flights Ariane 5GS
Atlas V 431
H-IIA 2022
Retirements Atlas IIIB
Titan IVB
Manned flights
Orbital 4
Total travellers 15


Launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

12 January
18:47:08[1]
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17B United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesDeep Impact NASA Heliocentric Comet flyby In orbit Successful
United StatesDeep Impact impactor NASA Heliocentric Comet impactor 4 July
05:52
Successful
Visited 9P/Tempel. Impactor impacted comet to test composition, main probe subsequently reused for EPOXI mission to study extrasolar planets and conduct a flyby of comet 103P/Hartley. Stardust-NExT mission will fly past comet to inspect the crater caused by the impactor, as debris thrown up prevented Deep Impact from doing so.
18 January
13:58:00[2]
United StatesSuper Loki NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
GermanyROMA 2005 RWCH05[3] DLR Suborbital Weather 18 January Successful
18 January
16:07[2]
United StatesSuper Loki NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
GermanyROMA 2005 RWCH08[3] DLR Suborbital Weather 18 January Successful
18 January
17:57[2]
United StatesSuper Loki NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
GermanyROMA 2005 RWCH11[3] DLR Suborbital Weather 18 January Successful
20 January
03:00:07[1]
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 Russia
RussiaKosmos 2414 (Parus) Low Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaUniversitetsky-Tatyana (RS-23) MGU Low Earth Technology[5] In orbit Successful
Universitetsky-Tatyana ceased operations at around 21:00 UTC on 6 March 2007[4]
20 January
09:16[2]
United StatesSuper Loki NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
GermanyROMA 2005 RWCH14[3] DLR Suborbital Weather 18 January Successful

February[edit]

1 February FranceM45 FranceBiscarosse FranceFrench Navy
French Navy Suborbital Missile test 1 February Successful
Apogee: 800 kilometres (500 mi)[6]
2 February
20:57:00[6]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesBarking Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target[6] 2 February Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)[6]
3 February
02:27:32
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesAMC-12 (WORLDSAT 2) SES Americom Geosynchronous Communication In orbit Operational
3 February
07:41
United StatesAtlas IIIB United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-36B RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesUSA-181 (NOSS-3 F3A) NRO Low Earth ELINT In orbit Operational
United StatesUSA-181 (NOSS-3 F3B) NRO Low Earth ELINT In orbit Operational
NRO Launch 23 "Canis Minor", final flight of Atlas IIIB
12 February
21:03:01
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
United StatesXTAR-EUR XTAR[7] Geosynchronous Communication In orbit Operational
FranceMaqsat-B2 Arianespace Geosynchronous transfer Technology 3 December 2012 Successful
NetherlandsSloshsat-FLEVO SRON Geosynchronous transfer Microgravity In orbit Successful
Sloshsat-FLEVO deployed from Maqsat-B2
14 February
06:22[6]
United StatesUGM-27 Polaris (STARS) United StatesKodiak United StatesSMDC
United StatesIFT-14 Target MDA Suborbital Target[6] 14 February Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi),[6] interceptor launch cancelled[8]
24 February
21:03[6]
United StatesAries United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-04-1 Target MDA Suborbital Target[6] 24 February Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi),[6] interceped by SM-3
24 February
21:04[6]
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Lake Erie[9] United StatesMDA
United StatesFTM-04-1 Interceptor MDA Suborbital Aegis test 24 February Successful
"Stellar Dragon", apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi),[6] interceped Aries
26 February
09:25
JapanH-IIA 2022 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanJAXA
JapanHimawari 6 (MTSAT 1R) MLIT/JMA Geosynchronous ATC/Weather In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of H-IIA 2022
28 February
19:09:18
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-52 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 16 June
00:02
Successful
RussiaTNS-0 RNII KP Low Earth Technology 30 August[10] Successful
ISS flight 17P, TNS-0 deployed from the International Space Station at 08:30 UTC on 28 March, during an EVA

March[edit]

1 March
03:50:59
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United StatesXM-3 "Rhythm" XM Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
1 March
23:13:00[6]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesBarking Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 1 March Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
2 March
04:00:14[6]
United StatesUGM-133 Trident II D5 United StatesUSS Tennessee, ETR LP-5 United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test 2 March Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), FCET-33
2 March
05:09:16[6]
United StatesUGM-133 Trident II D5 United StatesUSS Tennessee, ETR LP-5 United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test 2 March Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), FCET-33
2 March
21:11:00[6]
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesBarking Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 2 March Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
2 March
22:05:00[6]
United StatesTerrier-Oriole United StatesBarking Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 2 March Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
6 March
10:31:17[12]
CanadaBlack Brant XII United StatesPoker Flat LC-4 United StatesNASA
United StatesCASCADES Dartmouth Intended: Suborbital Auroral 6 March Launch failure
Third stage failed to ignite,[11] apogee: 29 kilometres (18 mi)[12]
11 March
21:42
United StatesAtlas V 431 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United KingdomInmarsat-4 F1 Inmarsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V 431
15 March
05:45:00[6]
United StatesImproved Orion United StatesPoker Flat LC-3 United StatesNASA
United StatesDUST Dartmouth Suborbital Micrometeoroids[13] 15 March Successful[14]
Apogee: 105 kilometres (65 mi)
15 March
07:45:00[6]
United StatesImproved Orion United StatesPoker Flat LC-2 United StatesNASA
United StatesDUST Dartmouth Suborbital Micrometeoroids[13] 15 March Successful[14]
Apogee: 105 kilometres (65 mi)
19 March PakistanShaheen-II PakistanSonmiani PakistanArmy of Pakistan
Army of Pakistan Suborbital Missile test 19 March Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
29 March
22:31L00
RussiaProton-K/DM-2M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaVKS
RussiaEkspress AM-2 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

April[edit]

8 April
05:56
IndiaRH-300 Mk.II IndiaSatish Dhawan IndiaISRO
PRL Suborbital Aeronomy 8 April Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
8 April
17:30
United StatesCastor 4B MRT United StatesC-17, Pacific Ocean United StatesOrbital Sciences
Orbital Sciences Suborbital Test flight 8 April Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
11 April
13:35
United StatesMinotaur I United StatesVandenberg SLC-8 United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesUSA-165 (XSS-11) USAFRL Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
12 April
12:00
ChinaLong March 3B ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCASC
ChinaApstar VI APT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
15 April
00:46:25
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-6 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 11 11 October
01:09:00
Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts
15 April
17:26:50
United StatesPegasus-XL United StatesStargazer, Vandenberg United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesDART NASA Low Earth Technology In orbit Spacecraft failure
Rendezvous with MUBLCOM communications satellite failed due to navigation malfunction which led to satellites colliding in orbit. Deactivated eleven hours after launch.
26 April
07:31:29
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United StatesSpaceway 1 DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
30 April
00:50
United StatesTitan IV(403)B United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-40 United StatesLockheed Martin
United StatesUSA-182 (Lacrosse 5) NRO Low Earth Radar imaging In orbit Operational
NRO Launch 16, final Titan launch from Cape Canaveral

May[edit]

2 May
05:00
United KingdomSkylark 7 SwedenEsrange Skylark Tower United KingdomSounding Rocket Services[15]
European UnionMaser-10 ESA Suborbital Microgravity 2 May Successful
Final Skylark launch, apogee: 252 kilometres (157 mi)
5 May
04:45
IndiaPSLV IndiaSatish Dhawan SLP IndiaISRO
IndiaCARTOSAT-1 ISRO Sun-synchronous Remote sensing In orbit Operational
IndiaHAMSAT (VUSat-Oscar 52) AMSAT-India Sun-synchronous Amateur radio In orbit Operational
5 May
09:35:00
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWallops United StatesNASA
United StatesMCAFT-1/IBSi IBSi Suborbital Biological 5 May Successful
Apogee: 156 kilometres (97 mi)
20 May
10:22:01
United StatesDelta II 7320 United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesNOAA-18 (NOAA-N) NOAA Sun-synchronous Weather In orbit Operational
22 May
17:59:08
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesDirecTV-8 DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
27 May RussiaR-17 Elbrus (B) SyriaMinakh SyriaSyrian Army
Syrian Army Suborbital Missile test 27 May Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
27 May RussiaR-17 Elbrus (D) SyriaMinakh SyriaSyrian Army
Syrian Army Suborbital Missile test 27 May Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
27 May RussiaR-17 Elbrus (D) SyriaMinakh SyriaSyrian Army
Syrian Army Suborbital Missile test 27 May Launch failure
Disintegrated over Turkey
31 May
12:00
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaEuropean UnionFoton-M2 Roskosmos/ESA Low Earth Microgravity 16 June Successful
Recovered intact

June[edit]

12 June ChinaJu Lang 2 ChinaSubmarine, Yellow Sea ChinaPLAN
PLAN Suborbital Missile test 12 June Successful
16 June
23:09:34
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-53 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 7 September
14:12:40
Successful
ISS flight 18P
21 June
00:48:37
RussiaMolniya-M/ML RussiaPlesetsk Site 16/2 RussiaVKS
RussiaMolniya-3K #12L VKS Intended: Molniya Communications +6 minutes Launch failure
Failed to achieve orbit following third stage malfunction
21 June
19:46:09
RussiaVolna RussiaK-496 Borisoglebsk, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
United StatesCosmos 1 Planetary Society Intended: Low Earth Technology 21 June Launch failure
Experimental solar sail, first stage engine failure 83 seconds after launch
23 June
14:03:00
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United NationsIntelsat Americas 8 (2005–2007)
Galaxy 28 (2007—)
Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Originally ordered as Telstar 8 for Loral Space & Communications, sold to Intelsat before launch
24 June
19:41:00
RussiaProton-K/DM-2 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaVKS
RussiaEkspress AM-3 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
28 June
22:54
United StatesTerrier-ASAS United StatesWallops United StatesNASA
NASA Suborbital Test flight 28 June Successful

July[edit]

4 July
08:41
United StatesImproved Orion NorwayAndøya NorwayFFI
NorwayIMEF Oslo Suborbital Aeronomy/Ionospheric 4 July Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
5 July
22:40
ChinaLong March 2D ChinaJiuquan LA-4/SLS-1[16] ChinaCASC
ChinaShijian 7 CASC Low Earth Scientific In orbit Operational
7 July
16:20:00
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
United StatesVAULT 3 NRL Suborbital Solar 7 July Successful
7 July
16:20:00
ChinaDong Feng 21 ChinaXichang ChinaPLA
PLA Suborbital ASAT test 7 July Launch failure
Intercept failed
10 July
03:30
JapanM-V JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JapanSuzaku (ASTRO-EII) JAXA Low Earth X-ray astronomy In orbit Operational
21 July
08:01
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-10 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesSERV-1 US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 21 July Successful
26 July
14:39:00
United StatesSpace Shuttle Discovery United StatesKennedy LC-39B United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-114 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 9 August
12:11:22
Successful
ItalyUnited StatesRaffaello MPLM ASI/NASA Low Earth (ISS) Logistics Successful
Manned orbital flight with seven astronauts, first Return to Flight mission after Columbia accident, Orbiter required repairs whilst in orbit.

August[edit]

2 August
07:30[1]
ChinaLong March 2C ChinaJiuquan ChinaCNSA
ChinaFSW-21 (FSW-3 #4)[17] CNSA Low Earth Remote sensing 28 August
23:38[18]
Successful
Recovered after reentry
3 August
18:45
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
United StatesUSC-6 USCLA Suborbital Solar 3 August Successful
3 August United StatesCastor 4B United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesCHCM-1 US Army Suborbital Test flight 3 August Successful
Apogee: 400 kilometres (250 mi)
11 August
08:20:44
European UnionAriane 5GS FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
ThailandThaicom 4 (iPSTAR) Shin Satellite Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Ariane 5GS
12 August
11:43:00
United StatesAtlas V 401 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesMars Reconnaissance Orbiter NASA Areocentric Mars orbiter In orbit Operational
13 August
23:28:26
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
United StatesGalaxy 14 PanAmSat (2005–2006)
Intelsat (2006—)
Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
17 August
07:06
RussiaR-29RMU Sineva RussiaSeverodvinsk, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 17 August Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
18 August United StatesCastor 4B United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesCHCM-1 US Army Suborbital Test flight 18 August Successful
Apogee: 400 kilometres (250 mi)
23 August
21:09:59
UkraineDnepr-1 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 109/95 RussiaISC Kosmotras
JapanKirari (OICETS) JAXA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
JapanReimei (INDEX) JAXA Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
Kirari deactivated on 24 September 2009[19]
26 August
08:01
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-26 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-188GM/SERV-2 US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 26 August Successful
Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
26 August
18:34:28
RussiaRokot/Briz-KM RussiaPlesetsk Site 133/3 RussiaVKS
RussiaMonitor-E Roskosmos Low Earth Environmental In orbit Operational
Control issues shortly after launch, resolved within a few months
29 August
18:45
ChinaLong March 2D ChinaJiuquan LA-4 ChinaCASC
ChinaFSW-22 (FSW-3 #5) CNSA Low Earth Reconnaissance 17 October Successful

September[edit]

2 September
09:50
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2415 (Yantar-1KFT/Kometa) VKS Low Earth Optical imaging 15 October
21:44
Successful
1,700th launch of R-7 derived rocket, film capsule and camera recovered after reentry
7 September
08:53
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-04 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-187-1GM US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 7 September Successful
Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
8 September
13:07:54
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-54 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 3 March 2006
13:05
Successful
RussiaUnited StatesRadioSkaf (SuitSat/AO-54) AMSAT Low Earth Amateur radio 7 September 2006
16:00
Partial spacecraft failure
ISS flight 19P. RadioSkaf integrated into Orlan-M No. 14 to form SuitSat, which was deployed from the ISS at 23:05 UTC on 3 February 2006, during an EVA. SuitSat transmissions significantly weaker than expected.
8 September
21:53:40
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
CanadaAnik F1R Telesat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
14 September
08:01
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-09 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-189GM/ALCS US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 14 September Successful
Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
23 September
02:24:29
United StatesMinotaur I United StatesVandenberg SLC-8 United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesUSA-185 (STP-R1/Streak) DARPA Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
26 September
03:37:00
United StatesDelta II 7925-9.5 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-183 (GPS IIR-14/M1) US Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
26 September United StatesLRALT United StatesC-17, Midway United StatesMDA
MDA Suborbital Target 26 September Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi), test of COBRA DANE radar system
27 September
13:22
RussiaRSM-56 Bulava RussiaDmitri Donskoi, White Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 27 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), maiden flight of Bulava, launched whilst submarine was surfaced
30 September
07:06
RussiaR-29R Volna RussiaSvyatoy Georgiy Pobedonosets, Okhotsk RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 30 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)

October[edit]

1 October
03:54:53
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-7 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 12 8 April 2006
23:48
Successful
Manned orbital flight with three cosmonauts
7 October
21:30
RussiaVolna RussiaBorisoglebsk, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
European UnionRussiaIRDT-2R ESA/NPO Lavochkin Suborbital Technology 6 October Spacecraft failure
Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi), recovery failed
7 October
21:30
RussiaR-29RMU Sineva RussiaBorisoglebsk, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 7 October Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
8 October
15:02:00
RussiaRokot/Briz-KM RussiaPlesetsk Site 133/3 European UnionRussiaEurockot
European UnionCryoSat ESA Intended: Low Earth Environmental 8 October Launch failure
Second stage failed to shut down and separate, failed to orbit.
10 October
21:10:08[6]
United StatesUGM-133 Trident II D5 United KingdomHMS Vanguard, ETR United KingdomRoyal Navy
Royal Navy Suborbital Missile test 10 October Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), DASO-8
12 October
01:00
ChinaLong March 2F ChinaJiuquan LA-4/SLS-1 ChinaCALT
ChinaShenzhou 6 CASC Low Earth Technology/Biological 16 October
04:32:50
Successful
Carried two crewmembers, first Chinese spaceflight with multiple crew
13 October
22:32:00
European UnionAriane 5GS FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
FranceSyracuse 3A DGA Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesGalaxy 15 PanAmSat (2005–2006)
Intelsat (2006—)
Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Spacecraft failure
19 October
18:05
United StatesTitan IV(404)B United StatesVandenberg SLC-4E United StatesLockheed Martin
United StatesUSA-186 (Improved Crystal) NRO Low Earth Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
NRO Launch 20, Final flight of Titan IVB and the Titan family of rockets.
20 October
07:30[6]
RussiaRS-18B UR-100NU KazakhstanBaikonur Site 175/2[20] RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 20 October Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
27 October
06:52:26
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 RussiaNPO Polyot
ChinaBeijing-1 (China-DMC+4) Tsinghua Low Earth Optical imaging In orbit Operational
United KingdomTopSat MoD Low Earth Optical imaging In orbit Operational
IranSinah-1 ISA Low Earth Remote sensing In orbit Operational
European UnionSSETI Express (XO-53) SSETI/ESA Low Earth Technology In orbit Spacecraft failure
JapanCubeSat XI-V (CO-58) University of Tokyo Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
GermanyUWE-1 UWE Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
NorwaynCUBE-2 NSSP Low Earth Amateur radio In orbit Spacecraft failure
RussiaMozhaets-5 (RS-25) Mozhaiskiy/NPO PM Low Earth Technology
Amateur radio
In orbit Spacecraft failure
GermanyRubin-5-ASOLANT OHB System/AATiS Low Earth Technology Successful
Sinah-1 was the first Iranian satellite, SSETI Express lost due to power failure twelve and a half hours after launch as solar arrays were unable to recharge batteries;[21] Mozhaets 5 failed to separate from the carrier rocket, NCUBE-2 failed to contact the ground and Rubin-5 remained intentionally attached to the carrier rocket. UWE-1 operated until 17 November.[22]
27 October
13:45
BrazilUnited StatesVS-30/Orion NorwayAndøya GermanyDLR
GermanySHEFEX DLR Suborbital Missile test 27 October Successful
Apogee: 211 kilometres (131 mi)

November[edit]

1 November
17:10
RussiaRT-2PM Topol RussiaKapustin Yar RussiaRVSN
RussiaIP-10 RVSN Suborbital Missile test 1 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
2 November
22:34
United StatesTerrier Mk.70-Oriole United StatesBarking Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 2 November Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
8 November
14:06:59
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United KingdomInmarsat-4 F2 Inmarsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
9 November
03:33:34
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
European UnionVenus Express ESA Cytherocentric Venus orbiter In orbit Operational
14 November
20:30
United StatesTerrier-Improved Orion United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 14 November Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
16 November
23:46:00
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
United StatesSpaceway 2 DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
 IndonesiaTelkom 2 PT Telkom Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
18 November
18:12
United StatesCastor 4B (MRT) United StatesBarking Sands United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-04-2 Target US Navy Suborbital Target 18 November Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), intercepted by SM-3
18 November
18:16
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Lake Erie United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-04-2 Interceptor US Navy Suborbital Aegis test 18 November Successful
"Stellar Valkyrie", apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), interceped MRT
18 November
20:13
United StatesTerrier-Improved Orion United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 18 November Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
22 November United StatesTHAAD United StatesWhite Sands United StatesLockheed Martin[6]
United StatesFTT-1 Lockheed Martin Suborbital Test flight 22 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
29 November
07:44
RussiaRT-2PM Topol RussiaPlesetsk RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 29 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)

December[edit]

9 December
19:02:42
United StatesUGM-133 Trident II D5 United StatesSubmarine, ETR LP-5 United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test 9 December Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), FCET-34
14 December
03:04
United StatesOrbital Boost Vehicle Marshall IslandsMeck United StatesMDA
United StatesFT-1 MDA Suborbital GBI test 14 December Successful
Apogee: 1,800 kilometres (1,100 mi)
20 December
19:30
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWallops United StatesNASA
NASA Suborbital Technology 20 December Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
21 December
05:19
RussiaRSM-56 Bulava RussiaDmitri Donskoi, White Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 21 December Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), first submerged Bulava launch
21 December
18:38:20
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-55 Roskomsos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 19 June 2006
17:53
Successful
ISS flight 20P
21 December
19:34:20
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 RussiaVKS
RussiaGonets-D1M #13[1] Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2416 (Rodnik) VKS Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
21 December
22:33
European UnionAriane 5GS FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
European UnionMeteosat-9 (MSG-2) Eumetsat Geosynchronous Weather In orbit Operational
IndiaINSAT-4A ISRO Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
25 December
05:07:10
RussiaProton-K/DM-2 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2417 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2418 (GLONASS-M) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2419 (GLONASS) VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
28 December
05:19
RussiaSoyuz-FG/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
European UnionGIOVE A ESA Medium Earth Navigation
Technology
In orbit Operational
29 December
02:28
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesAMC-23 (2005–2007)
GE-23 (2007—)
SES Americom (2005–2007)
SAT-GE (2007—)
Geosynchronous Communication In orbit Operational
Originally ordered by GE Americom as GE-2i, transferred to SES Americom before launch and renamed AMC-13, then transferred to Worldsat as Worldsat-3 before being transferred back to SES Americom as AMC-23 in early 2005. Transferred to SAT-GE when it split from SES Americom in 2007.[23]
Unknown IndiaRH-300 Mk.II IndiaSatish Dhawan IndiaISRO
ISRO Suborbital Test flight   Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
Unknown United StatesUGM-133 Trident II D5 United StatesSubmarine, WTR United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test   Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)

Deep Space Rendezvous[edit]

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
14 January Cassini Flyby of Titan Closest approach: 60,000 kilometres (37,000 mi)
14 January Huygens Landed on Titan
15 February Cassini 3rd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
17 February Cassini Flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 1,180 kilometres (730 mi)
4 March Rosetta 1st flyby of the Earth Gravity assist
9 March Cassini Flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 500 kilometres (310 mi)
31 March Cassini 4th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 2,523 kilometres (1,568 mi)
16 April Cassini 5th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
4 July Deep Impact Projectile impacts 9P/Tempel 1
14 July Cassini Flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
2 August MESSENGER Flyby of the Earth Gravity assist
22 August Cassini 6th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 4,015 kilometres (2,495 mi)
7 September Cassini 7th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
12 September Hayabusa Arrival at asteroid 25143 Itokawa
26 September Cassini Flyby of Hyperion Closest approach: 990 kilometres (620 mi)
11 October Cassini Flyby of Dione Closest approach: 500 kilometres (310 mi)
28 October Cassini 8th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,446 kilometres (899 mi)
12 November MINERVA Failed to land on Itokawa
19 November Hayabusa Accidentally landed on Itokawa
The first asteroid ascent
Stayed for 30 min
25 November Hayabusa Made a touch-and-go on Itokawa for sampling Status unclear
26 November Cassini Flyby of Rhea Closest approach: 500 kilometres (310 mi)
26 December Cassini 9th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 10,429 kilometres (6,480 mi)

EVAs[edit]

Start Date/Time
(UTC)
Duration End Time
(UTC)
Spacecraft Crew Remarks
26 January
07:43
5 hours
28 minutes
13:11 Expedition 10
ISS Pirs
United StatesLeroy Chiao
RussiaSalizhan Sharipov
Completed the installation of the Universal Work Platform, mounted the European commercial experiment Rokviss (Robotic Components Verification on ISS) and its antenna, installed the Russian Biorisk experiment, and relocated a Japanese exposure experiment.[24][25]
28 March
06:25
4 hours
30 minutes
10:55 Expedition 10
ISS Pirs
United StatesLeroy Chiao
RussiaSalizhan Sharipov
Installed navigational and communications equipment for the arrival of the first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and deployed the 5-kilogram (11-pound) Russian TNS-0 nanosatellite.[24][26]
30 July
09:48
6 hours
50 minutes
17:36 STS-114
Discovery
JapanSoichi Noguchi
United StatesStephen Robinson
Performed using Shuttle airlock whilst docked to the ISS. Demonstrated shuttle thermal protection repair techniques and enhancements to the Station’s attitude control system. installed a base and cabling for an External Stowage Platform, rerouted power to Control Moment Gyroscope-2 (CMG-2), retrieved two exposure experiments, and replaced a faulty global positioning system antenna on the station.[27]
1 August
08:42
7 hours
14 minutes
15:56 STS-114
Discovery
JapanSoichi Noguchi
United StatesStephen Robinson
Performed using Shuttle airlock whilst docked to the ISS. Removed faulty CMG-1 from the Z1 truss, installed faulty CMG-1 into Discovery's payload bay, and installed new CMG-1 onto the Z1 truss segment.[28][29]
3 August
08:48
6 hours
1 minute
14:49 STS-114
Discovery
JapanSoichi Noguchi
United StatesStephen Robinson
Performed using Shuttle airlock whilst docked to the ISS. Photographed and inspected Discovery '​s heat shield, removed two protruding gap fillers from between tiles in the forward area of the orbiter’s underside, and installed amateur radio satellite PCSAT2.[30]
18 August
19:02
4 hours
58 minutes
19 August
00:00
Expedition 11
ISS Pirs
RussiaSergei Krikalyov
United StatesJohn L. Phillips
Retrieved one of three canisters from the Biorisk experiment, removed Micro-Particles Capturer experiment and Space Environment Exposure Device from Zvezda, retrieved Matroska experiment, installed an ATV docking television camera.[31][32]
7 November
15:32
5 hours
22 minutes
20:54 Expedition 12
ISS Quest
United StatesWilliam S. McArthur
RussiaValery Tokarev
Installed and set up the P1 Truss camera, retrieved a failed Rotary Joint Motor Controller (RJMC), jettisoned a Floating Potential Probe, and removed and replaced a remote power controller module on the Mobile Transporter.[33] First Quest-based spacewalk since April 2003.

Orbital launch summary[edit]

By country[edit]

2005 Launches.svg
  China (PRC)
  Europe
  India
  International
  Japan
  Russia/CIS
  United States
Orbital launch attempts by country in 2005
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
European Union Europe 5 5 0 0
 India 1 1 0 0
United Nations International 4 4 0 0 Sea Launch
 Japan 2 2 0 0
 People's Republic of China 5 5 0 0
 Russia/Commonwealth of Independent States CIS 26 23 3 0
 United States 12 12 0 0

By rocket[edit]

By family[edit]

Family Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane  Europe 5 5 0 0
Atlas  United States 3 3 0 0
Delta  United States 3 3 0 0
Energia  Ukraine 4 4 0 0
H-II  Japan 1 1 0 0
Long March  People's Republic of China 5 5 0 0
Minotaur  United States 2 2 0 0
Mu  Japan 1 1 0 0
Pegasus  United States 1 1 0 0
R07R-7  Russia 12 11 1 0
R14R-14  Russia 3 3 0 0
R29R-29  Russia 1 1 0 0
R36R-36  Ukraine 1 1 0 0
PSLV  India 1 1 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States 1 1 0 0
Titan  United States 2 2 0 0 Retired
Universal Rocket  Russia 9 8 1 0

By type[edit]

Rocket Country Family Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5  Europe Ariane 5 5 0 0
Atlas III  United States Atlas 1 1 0 0 Retired
Atlas V  United States Atlas 2 2 0 0
Delta II  United States Delta 3 3 0 0
Dnepr  Ukraine R-36 1 1 0 0
H-IIA  Japan H-II 1 1 0 0
Kosmos  Russia R-12/R-14 3 3 0 0
Long March 2  People's Republic of China Long March 4 4 0 0
Long March 3  People's Republic of China Long March 1 1 0 0
M-V  Japan Mu 1 1 0 0
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur 2 2 0 0
Molniya  Russia R-7 1 0 1 0
Pegasus  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
PSLV  India PSLV 1 1 0 0
Proton  Russia Universal Rocket 7 7 0 0
Soyuz  Russia R-7 11 11 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 1 1 0 0
Titan IV  United States Titan 2 2 0 0 Retired
UR-100  Russia Universal Rocket 2 1 1 0
Volna  Russia R-29 1 0 1 0
Zenit  Ukraine Energia 4 4 0 0

By configuration[edit]

Rocket Country Type Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5ECA  Europe Ariane 5 2 2 0 0
Ariane 5GS  Europe Ariane 5 3 3 0 0 Maiden flight
Atlas IIIB  United States Atlas III 1 1 0 0 Retired
Atlas V 401  United States Atlas V 1 1 0 0
Atlas V 431  United States Atlas V 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Delta II 7320  United States Delta II 1 1 0 0
Delta II 7925  United States Delta II 2 2 0 0
Dnepr-1  Ukraine Dnepr 1 1 0 0
H-IIA 2022  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Kosmos-3M  Russia Kosmos 3 3 0 0
Long March 2C  People's Republic of China Long March 2 1 1 0 0
Long March 2D  People's Republic of China Long March 2 2 2 0 0
Long March 2F  People's Republic of China Long March 2 1 1 0 0
Long March 3B  People's Republic of China Long March 3 1 1 0 0
M-V  Japan M-V 1 1 0 0
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur I 2 2 0 0
Molniya-M/ML  Russia Molniya 1 0 1 0 Retired
Pegasus-XL  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
PSLV  India PSLV 1 1 0 0
Proton-K/DM-2  Russia Proton 2 2 0 0
Proton-K/DM-2M  Russia Proton 1 1 0 0
Proton-M/Briz-M  Russia Proton 4 4 0 0
Rokot/Briz-KM  Russia UR-100 2 1 1 0
Soyuz-FG  Russia Soyuz 2 2 0 0
Soyuz-FG/Fregat  Russia Soyuz 3 3 0 0
Soyuz-U  Russia Soyuz 6 6 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 1 1 0 0
Titan IV(403)B  United States Titan IV 1 1 0 0 Retired
Titan IV(404)B  United States Titan IV 1 1 0 0 Retired
Volna-O  Russia Volna 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight
Zenit-3SL  Ukraine Zenit 4 4 0 0

By launch site[edit]

Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 19 19 0 0
Barents  Russia 1 0 1 0 Launched from K-496 Borisoglebsk submarine
Cape Canaveral  United States 6 6 0 0
Jiuquan  People's Republic of China 4 4 0 0
Kennedy  United States 1 1 0 0
Kourou  France 5 5 0 0
Ocean Odyssey United Nations International 4 4 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 6 4 2 0
Satish Dhawan  India 1 1 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 1 1 0 0
Uchinoura  Japan 1 1 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 5 5 0 0 One launch used Stargazer aircraft
Xichang  People's Republic of China 1 1 0 0

By orbit[edit]

Orbital regime Launches Achieved Not Achieved Accidentally
Achieved
Remarks
Low Earth orbit 29 27 2 0 7 to ISS
Medium Earth orbit 3 3 0 0
Geosynchronous/transfer 19 19 0 0
High Earth orbit 1 0 1 0 Molniya
Heliocentric orbit 3 3 0 0 Including planetary transfer orbits

References[edit]

Generic references:

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  2. ^ a b c d McDowell, Jonathan. "Y: Suborbital weather rocket launches". Orbital and Suborbital Launch Database. Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  3. ^ a b c d Wade, Mark. "Loki". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  4. ^ "Universitetsky [Tatyana, Tatiana]". Sat ND. 2007-04-06. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  5. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Universitetsky (Tatyana, RS 23)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v McDowell, Jonathan. "S: Suborbital launches (apogee 80+ km)". Orbital and Suborbital Launch Database. Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  7. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "XTAR-EUR". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  8. ^ "Ground Based Interceptor Testing". GlobalSecurity.org. 2008-03-01. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  9. ^ "Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Flight Test Successful". Missile Defense Agency. 2005-03-24. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  10. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  11. ^ Lynch, Kristina (2005-03-08). "CASCADES - Update". Dartmouth College. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  12. ^ a b McDowell, Jonathan. "A: Atmospheric launches (apogee 0-50 km)". Orbital and Suborbital Launch Database. Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  13. ^ a b "DUST - DustOrions, a Study of Mesospheric Meteoric Dust Layers". Dartmouth College. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  14. ^ a b "DUST - Update". Dartmouth College. 2005-03-15. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  15. ^ "Last launch for UK Skylark rocket". BBC News. 2005-04-29. Retrieved 2010-01-09. 
  16. ^ "LM-2D Successfully Launches Shijian-7 Satellite". China Great Wall Industry Corporation. 2009-07-06. Retrieved 2010-01-09. 
  17. ^ Wade, Mark. "FSW". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 16 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  18. ^ "China’s 21st Scientific Satellite Successfully Launched". China Great Wall Industry Corporation. 2009-08-02. Retrieved 2010-01-09. 
  19. ^ "Project Topics". Kirari. JAXA. 2009-09-24. Retrieved 2010-01-09. 
  20. ^ Wade, Mark. "Baikonur LC175/2". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 1 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-10. 
  21. ^ "SSETI Express nominated for 'Space Oscar'". European Space Agency. 2006-04-06. Archived from the original on 9 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-10. 
  22. ^ "UWE-1". AMSAT. Retrieved 2010-01-10. 
  23. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "AMC 23 -> GE 23". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2010-01-11. 
  24. ^ a b NASA (2005). "Expedition 10 Spacewalks". NASA. Archived from the original on 5 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  25. ^ NASA (2005). "International Space Station Status Report #05-4". NASA. Archived from the original on 11 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  26. ^ NASA (2005). "International Space Station Status Report #05-16". NASA. Archived from the original on 11 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  27. ^ NASA (2005). "STS-114 MCC Status Report #09". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  28. ^ NASA (2005). "STS-114 MCC Status Report #13". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  29. ^ Tariq Malik (2005). "Shuttle Astronauts Repair ISS Gyroscope in Second Spacewalk". Space.com. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  30. ^ NASA (2005). "STS-114 MCC Status Report #17". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  31. ^ NASA (2005). "Station Crew Completes Spacewalk". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  32. ^ NASA (2005). "International Space Station Status Report #05-40". NASA. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  33. ^ NASA (2005). "International Space Station Status Report #05-55". NASA. Retrieved October 7, 2008.