Philippine condiments

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A number of condiments and sidedishes are used in Philippine cuisine. They include:

Atchara, made from pickled green papaya.
Buro with mustard leaves and eggplant.
  • Atchara - a sweet pickled papaya relish. Also used as a side dish.[1]
  • Bagoong - fermented anchovy or shrimp paste, particularly popular in the dish kare-kare.
  • Banana ketchup - a sweet, red condiment made primarily of bananas.
  • Buro or Balao-Balao - fermented rice which can be colored plain (Capampangan: balao-balao) or dark pink (Tagalog: buro) and sometimes with fish, mainly a condiment for steamed/ boiled vegetables like okra, sweet potato leaves (talbos ng kamote), eggplant, etc.
  • Eggplant sauce - a sour sauce made of grilled eggplant, garlic and vinegar. Used in cocidos and as a side dish.
  • Latik - (Visayan usage only) a thick syrup made from coconut milk and sugar.
  • Lechon sauce - also known as liver sauce or breadcrumb sauce made out of ground liver or liver pâté, vinegar, sugar, and spices. A sweet, tangy light-brown sauce used in roasts and the pork dish called lechon.
  • Patis. Sometimes spiced with labuyo peppers, or kalamansi lime juice, in which case it is called patismansi.
  • Ensaladang mangga - green mango relish with tomatoes and onions.
  • Ensaladang talong - skinned grilled eggplant with tomatoes and onions.
  • Sukang may sili - cane or coconut vinegar spiced with labuyo peppers.
  • Sukang may toyo - cane or coconut vinegar with soy sauce. This may also contain the very hot labuyo peppers and/or onions. Sukang may toyo is used in the pork dish crispy pata.
  • Sweet and sour sauce - used on fried meats and spring rolls.
  • Toyo't Kalamansi (sometimes referred to simply as toyomansi) - soy sauce with kalamansi lime juice.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dagoon, Et Al (1997). Culinary Arts II. Rex Bookstore, Inc. ISBN 978-971-23-2157-3.