Montek Singh Ahluwalia

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Montek Singh Ahluwalia
Montekahuwalia.jpg
Deputy Chairman of the Planning Commission
In office
6 July 2004 – 26 May 2014
Preceded byK.C. Pant
Personal details
Born (1943-11-24) 24 November 1943 (age 77)
New Delhi, British India
Spouse(s)Isher Judge Ahluwalia (until her death in 2020)
Children2
Alma materUniversity of Delhi (B.A.)
University of Oxford (M.A., M.Phil.)
ProfessionEconomist
Civil servant

Montek Singh Ahluwalia (born 24 November 1943) is an Indian economist and civil servant who was the Deputy Chairman of the Planning Commission of India, a position which carried the rank of a Cabinet Minister. He tendered his resignation for this post in May 2014 following the impending end of the UPAII regime at the center.[1] He was previously the first Director of the Independent Evaluation Office at the International Monetary Fund.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Montek Singh Ahluwalia was born in New Delhi in 1943. He studied at St. Patrick's High School, Secunderabad and Delhi Public School, Mathura Road. He graduated with a B.A. (Hons) degree from St. Stephen's College, Delhi, University of Delhi. He was a Rhodes scholar at the University of Oxford where he studied at Magdalen College, Oxford, as a graduate obtaining an M.A. in philosophy, politics and economics.[3] He then read for an MPhil at St Antony's College, Oxford. While at Oxford, he was president of the Oxford Union. He has received several honorary degrees, including an honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law from the University of Oxford and an honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. He is an Honorary Fellow of Magdalen College.[4]

Career[edit]

After graduating from University of Oxford, Ahluwalia joined the World Bank in 1968. At the age of 28, he became the youngest "Division Chief" in the World Bank's bureaucracy, in charge of the Income Distribution Division in the World Bank's Development Research Centre.

He returned to India in 1979 to take up the position of Economic Adviser in the Ministry of Finance. He held several senior positions as a civil servant, including Special Secretary to the Prime Minister, Commerce secretary, Secretary Department of Economic Affairs in the Finance Ministry and Finance Secretary. In 1998 he was appointed Member of the Planning Commission.

In 2001, he was chosen by the Board of International Monetary Fund to be the first director of the newly created Independent Evaluation Office, in which capacity he supervised several studies critical of various aspects of the functioning of the IMF.

In June 2004, he resigned from the IMF position to take up as the deputy chairman of the Planning Commission as part of the United Progressive Alliance government in New Delhi.

Ahluwalia has been a key figure in the Indian economic reform process. He has consistently pushed for economic reforms involving a shift from the earlier reliance on extensive government control over the economy with high levels of protection, to a much more open economy with a larger role for the private sector responding to market forces and greater openness to imports, foreign technology and direct foreign investment.

As deputy chairman of the Planning Commission from 2004 onwards, he supervised the preparation of both the Eleventh Plan (2007–08 to 2011–12) titled "Towards Faster and More Inclusive Growth" and subsequently also the Twelfth Plan (2012–13 to 2016–17) titled "Faster, More Inclusive and Sustainable Growth".

The President of India awarded him the Padma Vibhushan, India's second highest civilian honour for public service.

He has published a number of articles on various aspects of the Indian economy in academic journals. He is one of the authors of "Redistribution with Growth" by Chenery et al., published by Oxford University Press in 1974. He has also written on various aspects of India's economic reforms and on the inclusiveness of India's growth process (http://planningcommission.gov.in/aboutus/history/index.php?about=spemsabody.htm).

In February 2020, he published his book Backstage: The Story Behind India’s High Growth Years with Rupa Publications. The book is a mix of personal reflections and national economic history, and sets forth Ahluwalia's ideas on issues of contemporary significance including education, rural development and energy.

Gallery[edit]

Publications[edit]

Journal articles[edit]

  • Ahluwalia, Montek Singh (August 1994). "Ensuring a prosperous future". Yojana. 38 (12–13).
  • Ahluwalia, Montek Singh. "India's economic reforms: an appraisal". Planning Commission. Government of India.

Book[edit]

  • Backstage: The Story Behind India’s High Growth Years (15 February 2020), Rupa Publications India, ISBN 9353338212[5]

Chapters in books[edit]

  • Ahluwalia, Montek Singh (2009), "Growth, distribution and inclusiveness: reflections on India's experience", in Kanbur, Ravi; Basu, Kaushik (eds.), Arguments for a better world: essays in honor of Amartya Sen | Volume II: Society, institutions and development, Oxford New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 327–349, ISBN 9780199239979.

World Bank[edit]

  • Ahluwalia, Montek Singh (1977). Rural poverty and agricultural performance in India. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank. OCLC 236128470. Reprint series number 60.

Personal life[edit]

Ahluwalia was married to fellow economist the late Dr. Isher Judge Ahluwalia and has two sons Pawan Ahluwalia and Aman Ahluwalia.[6]

Awards and honours[edit]

Year of Award or Honor Name of Award or Honor Awarding Organization
2013 Honoris Causa Doctorate of Science Indian School of Mines
2011 Honoris Causa Doctorate of Science IIT Roorkee.[7]
2011 Padma Vibhushan President of India.
2008 Doctor of Civil Law Oxford University.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Planning Commission Deputy Chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia Resigns". NDTV. Retrieved 21 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Planning Commission". Government of India. Archived from the original on 25 July 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2013.
  3. ^ See R.W. Johnson, Look Back in Laughter: Oxford's Postwar Golden Age, Threshold Press, 2015.
  4. ^ http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk/people-at-magdalen/
  5. ^ Singhal, Rajrishi (28 March 2020). "Montek Singh Ahluwalia's hard policy truths". Livemint.
  6. ^ "Team Manmohan recalls its trusted hand: Montek". archive.indianexpress.com. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  7. ^ Doctorate, Ahluwalia (12 November 2011). "Ahluwalia awarded Honorary Doctorate". Zee news. Retrieved 12 November 2011.

External links[edit]