Pyrazolam

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Pyrazolam
Pyrazolam structure.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral, Sublingual, rectal
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Elimination half-life 17 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C16H12BrN5
Molar mass 354.204 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

Pyrazolam is a benzodiazepine derivative originally developed by a team led by Leo Sternbach at Hoffman-La Roche in the 1970s,[1] and subsequently "rediscovered" and sold as a designer drug starting in 2012.[2][3][4][5][6]

Pyrazolam has structural similarities to alprazolam[7] and bromazepam. Unlike other benzodiazepines, pyrazolam does not appear to undergo metabolism, instead being excreted unchanged in the urine.[2][8] It is most selective for the α2 and α3 subtypes of the GABAA receptor.[9]

Legal Status[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

In the UK, pyrazolam has been classified as a Class C drug by section 5 of the May 2017 amendment to The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 along with several other designer benzodiazepine drugs.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ US 3954728, "Preparation of triazolo benzodiazepines and novel compounds" 
  2. ^ a b Moosmann, B.; Hutter, M.; Huppertz, L. M.; Ferlaino, S.; Redlingshöfer, L.; Auwärter, V. (July 2013). "Characterization of the designer benzodiazepine pyrazolam and its detectability in human serum and urine". Forensic Toxicology. 31 (2): 263–271. doi:10.1007/s11419-013-0187-4. 
  3. ^ Bjoern Moosmann; Leslie A King; Volker Auwärter (June 2015). "Designer benzodiazepines: A new challenge". World Psychiatry. 14 (2): 248. doi:10.1002/wps.20236. PMC 4471986Freely accessible. PMID 26043347. 
  4. ^ Madeleine Pettersson Bergstrand; Anders Helander; Therese Hansson; Olof Beck (2016). "Detectability of designer benzodiazepines in CEDIA, EMIT II Plus, HEIA, and KIMS II immunochemical screening assays". Drug Testing and Analysis. 9 (4): 640–645. doi:10.1002/dta.2003. PMID 27366870. 
  5. ^ Høiseth, Gudrun; Tuv, Silja Skogstad; Karinen, Ritva (2016). "Blood concentrations of new designer benzodiazepines in forensic cases". Forensic Science International. 268: 35–38. doi:10.1016/j.forsciint.2016.09.006. PMID 27685473. 
  6. ^ Manchester, Kieran R.; Maskell, Peter D.; Waters, Laura (2018). "Experimental versus theoretical log D7.4, pKa and plasma protein binding values for benzodiazepines appearing as new psychoactive substances". Drug Testing and Analysis. doi:10.1002/dta.2387. ISSN 1942-7611. PMID 29582576. 
  7. ^ Hester Jr, J. B.; Rudzik, A. D.; Kamdar, B. V. (November 1971). "6-Phenyl-4H-s-triazolo[4,3-a][l,4]benzodiazepines Which Have Central Nervous System Depressant Activity". J. Med. Chem. 14 (11): 1078–1081. doi:10.1021/jm00293a015. PMID 5165540. 
  8. ^ Characterization of the designer benzodiazepines pyrazolam and flubromazepam and study on their detectability in human serum and urine samples, B. Moosmann, M. Hutter, L. M. Huppertz and V. Auwärter
  9. ^ Hester, J. B.; von Voigtlander, P. (November 1979). "6-Aryl-4H-s-triazolo[4,3-a][1,4]benzodiazepines. Influence of 1-substitution on pharmacological activity". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 22 (11): 1390–1398. doi:10.1021/jm00197a021. PMID 42799. 
  10. ^ "The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Amendment) Order 2017".