Trional

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Trional
Trional structure.png
Trional ball-and-stick.png
Clinical data
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
  • 2,2-bis(ethylsulfonyl)butane
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.000.858 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC8H18O4S2
Molar mass242.35 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CCC(C)(S(=O)(=O)CC)S(=O)(=O)CC
  • InChI=1S/C8H18O4S2/c1-5-8(4,13(9,10)6-2)14(11,12)7-3/h5-7H2,1-4H3 checkY
  • Key:LKACJLUUJRMGFK-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Trional (Methylsulfonal) is a sedative-hypnotic[1] and anesthetic drug with GABAergic actions[citation needed]. It has similar effects to sulfonal, except it is faster acting.[2]

History[edit]

Trional was prepared and introduced by Eugen Baumann and Alfred Kast in 1888.[3]

Appeared in Agatha Christie's "Murder on the Orient Express", "And Then There Were None" and other novels such as John Bude’s “The Lake District Murder” as a sleep inducing sedative, and in In Search of Lost Time (Sodom and Gomorrah) by Marcel Proust as a hypnotic. Sax Rohmer also references trional in his novel Dope.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Trional". Merck's 1907 Index. New York: Merck & Co. 1907. p. 448.
  2. ^ Sajous CE (1896). "General Therapeutics". Annual of the Universal Medical Sciences. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis. 5: A-156.
  3. ^ Drinkwater H (1924). Fifty years of medical progress, 1873-1922. New York: The Macmillan Company. p. 40.