United States Senate elections, 2020

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United States Senate elections, 2020

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

Class 2 (33 of the 100) seats in the United States Senate
(and 1 special election)
51 seats needed for a majority

United States Senate elections, 2020.svg
Seats up for election:
     Democratic incumbent
     Republican incumbent
     Undetermined incumbent
     No election

Elections to the United States Senate will be held on November 3, 2020 with the 33 Class 2 seats of the Senate being contested in regular elections. The winners will serve six-year terms from January 3, 2021, until January 3, 2027. Additionally, there will be a special election in Arizona to fill the seat of John McCain.

The 2020 presidential election, elections to the entire House of Representatives, elections for governors in some states and territories, and many state and local elections will also be held on this date.

In 2014, the last regular election of the Class 2 Senate seats, Republicans won a net gain of nine seats from the Democrats, and have significantly more seats to defend, though many are not considered competitive.

Partisan composition[edit]

The composition of the Senate going into the 2020 election will depend on the results of the 2018 elections. In the 2020 election, all 33 Class 2 Senate seats are up for election; there are currently 20 Republicans and 12 Democrats whose seats will be up for election, and one seat to be determined in the 2018 elections. The exact numbers could change if vacancies or party switches occur. There will be a special election to fill John McCain's seat. Additional special elections may also be held in 2020 if additional vacancies arise in Class 1 or Class 3 Senate seats.

One seat, Mississippi will be decided in 2018 special elections and it is listed below as "Unknown."

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent Unknown
Last election (2018) 47 51 2 2 100
Before this election 47 51 2 2 100
Not up 33 30 2 1 66
Class 1 (20122018) 21 9 2 1 33
Class 3 (2016→2022) 12 21 0 0 33
Up 12 21 0 1 34
Class 2 (2014→2020) 12 20 0 1 33
Special: Class 3 0 1 0 0 1
Incumbent retiring 0 0 0 0 0
Incumbent running 1 2 0 0 3
Intent undeclared 11 19 0 1 31

Change in composition[edit]

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the elections[edit]

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election: Some "Ran" for re-election, some "Retired," and the remainder (without a note) were not up for election this year. Before the elections, Democrats had at least 45 seats, Independents 2, and Republicans had at least a 51-seat majority.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40
Undeclared
D39
Undeclared
D38
Undeclared
D37
Undeclared
D36
Undeclared
D35
Undeclared
D34
Running
D33 D32 D31
D41
Undeclared
D42
Undeclared
D43
Undeclared
D44
Undeclared
D45
Undeclared
I1 I2 TBD TBD
Undeclared
R51
Undeclared
Majority →
R41
Undeclared
R42
Undeclared
R43
Undeclared
R44
Undeclared
R45
Undeclared
R46
Undeclared
R47
Undeclared
R48
Undeclared
R49
Undeclared
R50
Undeclared
R40
Undeclared
R39
Undeclared
R38
Undeclared
R37
Undeclared
R36
Undeclared
R35
Undeclared
R34
Undeclared
R33
Undeclared
R32
Running
R31
Running
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections[edit]

Each block indicates the results of each election: Some senators will be "Re-elected," some will be a "Gain" in the seat from the other party (either by beating an incumbent or by winning an open seat), some will be a "Hold" by the same party but with a different senator, and the remainder (without a note) are not up for election this year. After the elections, Democrats will have at least 33 seats, Independents 2, and Republicans will have at least a 30 seats. Therefore, the majority control will be determined by whichever party wins enough seats in this election to hold at least 51 seats.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD I2 I1 D33 D32 D31
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
Majority →
TBD
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
R30 R29 R28 R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Potentially competitive races[edit]

Potentially competitive Republican-held seats up for election in 2020 include Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Kentucky, Montana, North Carolina, and Texas. Democratic-held seats in Alabama, Minnesota, Michigan, Virginia, and New Hampshire may also be competitive.[1]

Pre-election predictions[edit]

Most election predictors use:

  • "tossup": no advantage
  • "tilt" (used sometimes): advantage that is not quite as strong as "lean"
  • "lean": slight advantage
  • "likely" or "favored": significant, but surmountable, advantage
  • "safe" or "solid": near-certain chance of victory
State PVI[2] Incumbent Last
Election
Cook
Nov 16,
2018
[3]
I.E. Sabato RCP Daily Kos 538[a] Winner
Alabama R+14 Doug Jones 50.0% D Lean D
Alaska R+9 Dan Sullivan 48.0% R Safe R
Arizona
(Special)
R+5 Jon Kyl
(Retiring)
N/A Lean R
Arkansas R+15 Tom Cotton 56.5% R Safe R
Colorado D+1 Cory Gardner 48.2% R Lean R
Delaware D+6 Chris Coons 55.8% D Safe D
Georgia R+5 David Perdue 52.9% R Likely R
Idaho R+19 Jim Risch 65.3% R Safe R
Illinois D+7 Dick Durbin 53.5% D Safe D
Iowa R+3 Joni Ernst 52.1% R Safe R
Kansas R+13 Pat Roberts 53.1% R Safe R
Kentucky R+15 Mitch McConnell 56.2% R Likely R
Louisiana R+11 Bill Cassidy 55.9% R Safe R
Maine D+3 Susan Collins 68.5% R Lean R
Massachusetts D+12 Ed Markey 61.9% D Safe D
Michigan D+1 Gary Peters 54.6% D Safe D
Minnesota D+1 Tina Smith 53% D Likely D
Mississippi R+9 TBD N/A Safe R
Montana R+11 Steve Daines 57.9% R Safe R
Nebraska R+14 Ben Sasse 64.5% R Safe R
New Hampshire EVEN Jeanne Shaheen 51.5% D Safe D
New Jersey D+7 Cory Booker 55.8% D Safe D
New Mexico D+3 Tom Udall 55.6% D Safe D
North Carolina R+3 Thom Tillis 48.8% R Likely R
Oklahoma R+20 Jim Inhofe 68.0% R Safe R
Oregon D+5 Jeff Merkley 55.7% D Safe D
Rhode Island D+10 Jack Reed 70.6% D Safe D
South Carolina R+8 Lindsey Graham 55.3% R Safe R
South Dakota R+14 Mike Rounds 50.4% R Safe R
Tennessee R+14 Lamar Alexander 61.9% R Safe R
Texas R+8 John Cornyn 61.6% R Safe R
Virginia D+1 Mark Warner 49.1% D Safe D
West Virginia R+19 Shelley Moore Capito 62.1% R Safe R
Wyoming R+25 Mike Enzi 72.2% R Safe R

Race summary[edit]

Special elections during the preceding Congress[edit]

In this special election, the winner will serve as soon as they are elected and qualified.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Arizona
(Class 3)
Jon Kyl Republican 1994
2000
2006
2012 (Retired)
2018 (Appointed)
Incumbent retiring.[4]
New senator will be elected.
TBD

Elections leading to the next Congress[edit]

In these general elections, the winners will be elected for the term beginning January 3, 2021. All of the elections involve the Class 2 seats; ordered by state.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Doug Jones Democratic 2017 (Special) Incumbent running. Doug Jones (Democratic)
Alaska Dan Sullivan Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Arkansas Tom Cotton Republican 2014 Incumbent running. Tom Cotton (Republican)[5]
Colorado Cory Gardner Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. Derrick Blanton (Democratic)[6]
Dustin Leitzel (Democratic)[7]
Delaware Chris Coons Democratic 2010 (Special)
2014
Incumbent running. Chris Coons (Democratic)
Scott Walker (Republican)
Georgia David Perdue Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Idaho Jim Risch Republican 2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Illinois Dick Durbin Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Iowa Joni Ernst Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Kansas Pat Roberts Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. Elliott Adams (Democratic)[8]
Kentucky Mitch McConnell Republican 1984
1990
1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent running. Steven Cox (Democratic)[9]
Mitch McConnell (Republican)[10]
Louisiana Bill Cassidy Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Maine Susan Collins Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. Max Linn (Republican)[11]
Cathleen London (Democratic)[12]
Massachusetts Ed Markey Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
Incumbent running. Ed Markey (Democratic)[13]
Michigan Gary Peters Democratic 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Minnesota Tina Smith Democratic 2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Mississippi TBD TBD 2018 (Special) Incumbent unknown; to be determined in the 2018 special election. TBD
Montana Steve Daines Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Nebraska Ben Sasse Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
New Jersey Cory Booker Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
Incumbent running. Cory Booker (Democratic)[14]
New Mexico Tom Udall Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent running. Tom Udall (Democratic)[15]
North Carolina Thom Tillis Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. Eva F. Lee (Democratic)[16]
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe Republican 1994 (Special)
1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Oregon Jeff Merkley Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Rhode Island Jack Reed Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
South Carolina Lindsey Graham Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
South Dakota Mike Rounds Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Tennessee Lamar Alexander Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Texas John Cornyn Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent running. John Cornyn (Republican)[17]
Virginia Mark Warner Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
West Virginia Shelley Moore Capito Republican 2014 Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD
Wyoming Mike Enzi Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent's intent unknown. TBD

Alabama[edit]

Incumbent Democrat Doug Jones was elected in a special election in 2017, defeating Republican candidate Roy Moore. Jones will be up for re-election for a second term beginning January 3rd, 2021.

Alaska[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Dan Sullivan was elected to a first term in 2014, defeating one-term incumbent Mark Begich.

Arizona (Special)[edit]

Six-term Republican senator John McCain died on August 25, 2018.[18] Governor Doug Ducey was required by state law to appoint a new senator of the same party as McCain, and then the seat would be up for a special election in November 2020 and this will determine who serves the remainder of the term until January 3, 2023.[19] On September 4, Governor Ducey appointed former Arizona senator Jon Kyl to fill McCain's vacancy. Kyl stated that he is only committed to serving until at least the end of the 115th United States Congress, and that he will not seek the seat again in 2020.[20]

Arkansas[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Tom Cotton was elected to a first term in 2014, defeating two-term incumbent Mark Pryor.

Colorado[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Cory Gardner was elected to a first term in 2014, defeating one-term incumbent Mark Udall.

Derrick Blanton and pharmacist Dustin Leitzel are running for the Democratic nomination.[6][7] Biomedical scientist Trish Zornio is exploring a run for the Democratic nomination.[21][22] Other potential Democratic candidates include Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett.[23]

Delaware[edit]

One-term Democrat Chris Coons was re-elected in 2014; Coons first took office after winning a 2010 special election, which occurred after long-time Senator Joe Biden resigned his seat to become Vice President of the United States.

Georgia[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican David Perdue was elected to a first term in 2014. He will be 70 on Election Day 2020.

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson is considering running for the Democratic nomination.[24] Other potential Democratic candidates include State Representative Scott Holcomb, State Senator Jen Jordan, former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and former Points of Light CEO and 2014 nominee Michelle Nunn.[25][26]

Idaho[edit]

Two-term incumbent Republican Jim Risch was re-elected in 2014.

Illinois[edit]

Four-term incumbent and Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, a Democrat, was re-elected in 2014. Durbin will be 75 on Election Day in 2020, and has not yet indicated whether he will seek a fifth term. Potential Democratic candidates, should Durbin retire, are former IL Attorney General Lisa Madigan and Democratic Nominee for IL-13 in 2018, Betsy Dirksen Londrigan.

Potential Republican candidates include former Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner, U.S. Representatives Rodney Davis and Darin LaHood, and Republican Nominee for IL Attorney General in 2018 Erika Harold.

Iowa[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Joni Ernst was elected to a first term in 2014.

Kansas[edit]

Four-term incumbent Republican Pat Roberts was re-elected in 2014, defeating independent candidate Greg Orman. Democrat Elliott Adams is running.[8]

Kentucky[edit]

Six-term incumbent and Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell was re-elected in 2014.

Democrat Steven Cox is running.[9]

Louisiana[edit]

One-term incumbent Bill Cassidy was first elected in 2014, defeating three-term incumbent Mary Landrieu.

Maine[edit]

Four-term incumbent Republican Susan Collins was re-elected in 2014. Max Linn, the Reform nominee for Governor of Florida in 2006, Democratic candidate for Florida's 10th congressional district in 2008, and disqualified candidate for U.S. Senate from Maine in 2018, announced he is running.[11] Physician and Maine Democratic Party State Committeewoman Cathleen London announced her candidacy.[12] Zak Ringelstein, 2018 Democratic nominee for Maine's other Senate seat, announced in September 2018 that he would challenge Collins in 2020 if not already in office. He was defeated in 2018 by incumbent Angus King.[27]

Massachusetts[edit]

One-term incumbent Democrat Ed Markey was re-elected in 2014; Markey first took office after winning a 2013 special election.

Michigan[edit]

One-term incumbent Democrat Gary Peters was elected to a first term in 2014.

Minnesota[edit]

This seat had been held by two-term incumbent Democrat Al Franken, but due to allegations of sexual misconduct, he resigned on January 2, 2018.[28] A special election was held in 2018 to elect a senator to serve the remainder of Franken's term. Previously appointed Senator Tina Smith won the 2018 special election and is the incumbent senator in the seat.

Mississippi[edit]

Seven-term incumbent Republican Thad Cochran resigned April 1, 2018. Governor Phil Bryant appointed Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith to hold office until the November 2018 special election. No candidate garnered a majority of votes in the November 6, 2018 election; the top two candidates, Cindy Hyde-Smith and Democrat Mike Espy will continue to a runoff on November 27, 2018. The winner of that special election will serve the remainder of Cochran's term, which ends in January 2021.

Montana[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Steve Daines was elected to a first term in 2014. Term-limited Governor Steve Bullock is a potential Democratic candidate.[29]

Nebraska[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Ben Sasse was elected to a first term in 2014.

New Hampshire[edit]

Two-term incumbent Democrat Jeanne Shaheen was re-elected in 2014.

New Jersey[edit]

One-term incumbent Democrat Cory Booker was re-elected in 2014; Booker first took office after winning a 2013 special election.

New Mexico[edit]

Two-term incumbent Democrat Tom Udall was re-elected in 2014.

North Carolina[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Thom Tillis was elected to a first term in 2014, defeating one-term incumbent Kay Hagan. Tillis could also potentially run for Governor.[30][31]

Former United States Secretary of Transportation and former Mayor of Charlotte Anthony Foxx may run.[32] Tax attorney Eva Lee is running for the Democratic nomination.[16]

Oklahoma[edit]

Four-term incumbent Republican Jim Inhofe was re-elected in 2014. Scott Pruitt may run for the seat if Inhofe retires.[33]

Oregon[edit]

Two-term incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley was re-elected in 2014.

Merkley may run for president and not for re-election to his Senate seat.[34]

Rhode Island[edit]

Four-term incumbent Democrat Jack Reed was re-elected in 2014.

South Carolina[edit]

Three-term incumbent Republican Lindsey Graham was re-elected in 2014.

South Dakota[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Mike Rounds was elected to a first term in 2014.

Tennessee[edit]

Three-term incumbent Republican Lamar Alexander was re-elected in 2014.

Texas[edit]

Three-term incumbent Republican John Cornyn was re-elected in 2014. He is running for re-election.[17] U.S. Representative Joaquín Castro or his twin brother — Julian Castro, former U.S. secretary of housing and urban development and former Mayor of San Antonio — may challenge Cornyn.[35][36] State Senator Rafael Anchia and U.S Representative Beto O'Rourke are also potential Democratic candidates.[37][38][39]

Virginia[edit]

Two-term incumbent Democrat Mark Warner was re-elected in 2014.

West Virginia[edit]

One-term incumbent Republican Shelley Moore Capito was elected to a first term in 2014.

Wyoming[edit]

Four-term incumbent Republican Mike Enzi was re-elected in 2014. Congresswoman Liz Cheney may run again for the seat as a Republican.[40]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Reflects the "classic" version of the forecast model.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kondik, Kyle (5 October 2017). "The Republican Senate Edge". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  2. ^ "2016 State PVI Changes – Decision Desk HQ". decisiondeskhq.com. December 15, 2017.
  3. ^ "Senate: 2020 Ratings & At-A-Glance". Cook Political Report. November 16, 2018.
  4. ^ Jonathan, Martin; Hakim, Danny. "Jon Kyl, Former Senator, Will Replace McCain in Arizona". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
  5. ^ "Sen. Cotton says he's running for reelection in 2020". Associated Press.
  6. ^ a b "BLANTON, DERRICK JAMES - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  7. ^ a b "LEITZEL, DUSTIN JOHN - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  8. ^ a b "ADAMS, ELLIOTT - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  9. ^ a b "COX, STEVEN JEWELL ISOM - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  10. ^ Beam, Adam. "McConnell announces re-elect campaign at Fancy Farm picnic". Associated Press.
  11. ^ a b Thistle, Scott (June 8, 2018). "Federal judge rejects Max Linn's effort to run in Maine Republican primary". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  12. ^ a b Dr Cathleen London [@DrChaya] (July 16, 2018). "I am running because #SCOTUS cannot wait @SenatorCollins needs to realize that Maine & the country are watching & she will be held accountable for her votes #mepolitics My announcement: www.doctorcatlondonforme.com/_api/media-share-server-for-video/crp5?instance-id=5f191a6c-020c-4fc6-9b82-2786411308cb&component-id=comp-jjog8axh&channel-id=2435a32f-3d87-4ae1-aac4-b8175b02e63c&video-id=b3603e263c0a42348786f1c1f8fe8d60&bi-token=8a23ff18-94ae-0e5a-0a87-60cb8863dede … @DrCat4ME" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  13. ^ Guzman, Dan (October 5, 2018). "Markey Confirms Plans To Run For Re-Election In 2020". WBUR. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  14. ^ Booker, Cory A. (November 21, 2014). "FEC FORM 2" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  15. ^ Monahan, Joe (November 8, 2018). "Flip Flop: Xochitl Takes It Back From Yvette; Plus: R's Running On Empty; Blame Game Underway, The Many Women Of The House, Ben Ray's Climb, Transition Time And Dona Ana Clerk Chaos". New Mexico Politics with Joe Monahan. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  16. ^ a b Adams, Matthew (August 11, 2017). "The election isn't until 2020, but Tillis has a challenger". The News & Observer. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  17. ^ a b Patrick, Svitek (September 24, 2017). "John Cornyn says he's supporting Ted Cruz for re-election in 2018". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  18. ^ Tumulty, Karen. "John McCain, 'maverick' of the Senate and former POW, dies at 81". The Washington Post. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  19. ^ "Who could be appointed to replace John McCain in the Senate, and the process behind it, explained". Vox. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  20. ^ "Arizona governor names former Sen. Jon Kyl as McCain's replacement". CNN. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  21. ^ Healy, Melissa (June 15, 2017). "Patricia Zornio, a biomedical researcher from a family of Trump supporters, hopes to stand up for science in the Senate". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  22. ^ Bunch, Joey (August 15, 2017). "Democrat Trish Zornio, scientist and community activist, weighing run against Gardner". Colorado Politics. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  23. ^ Byars, Mitchell (July 7, 2017). "Boulder DA Stan Garnett won't run for Congress in 2018, but ponders 2020 Senate race". The Denver Post. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  24. ^ Williams, Chuck (May 10, 2017). "Mayor Teresa Tomlinson makes decision on running for 2018 statewide office". Ledger-Enquirer. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  25. ^ Bluestein, Greg (May 10, 2017). "Georgia 2018: Columbus mayor won't run for higher office next year". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  26. ^ Kyle Trygstad (December 8, 2014). "What's Next for Michelle Nunn?". Roll Call. Retrieved December 9, 2014.
  27. ^ Ringelstein, Zak [@RingelsteinME] (September 24, 2018). "If @SenatorCollins votes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, I will make it my mission to defeat her in 2020, either as her colleague, or as her 2020 opponent. Chip in to help me stand up to Susan Collins and Brett Kavanaugh: secure.actblue.com/donate/zak_vs_collins# …" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  28. ^ Seipel, Brooke (7 December 2017). "Franken resigns in defiant floor speech".
  29. ^ Board, Post Editorial (August 7, 2015). "What are Bullock's Options?". Big Sky Words. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  30. ^ "Is Thom Tillis running for governor? - Real Facts NC". realfactsnc.com.
  31. ^ "FOUR GOP candidates for NC governor in 2020?". dailyhaymaker.com.
  32. ^ Dunn, Andrew (October 26, 2016). "What's the next move for Anthony Foxx?". Charlotte Agenda. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  33. ^ https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/18/politics/pruitt-political-ambitions-nyt/index.html
  34. ^ Redden, Jim. "Sources Say: Merkley confirms presidential aspirations". joomlakave.com. Retrieved 2017-10-01.
  35. ^ Whittaker, Richard (February 17, 2017). "Cruz or Cornyn vs. Castro or O'Rourke?". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  36. ^ Tracy, Abigail (May 31, 2017). "Meet the Kennedyesque Democrat Trying to Beat Ted Cruz". Vanity Fair. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  37. ^ "Twenty Faces to Watch in Politics by 2020". Houston Chronicle. April 16, 2009. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  38. ^ Swartz, Mimi (November 7, 2018). "The Success in Beto's Failure". The New York Times. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  39. ^ Henson, James (November 9, 2018). "Beto O'Rourke should run for Senate in 2020. He could win". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  40. ^ Hohmann, James (January 6, 2014) "Operatives: Liz Cheney could run again", Politico. Retrieved November 30, 2014.