2020 United States elections

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2020 United States elections
2019          2020           2021
Presidential election year
Election dayNovember 3
Incumbent presidentDonald Trump (Republican)
Next Congress117th
Presidential election
Electoral vote
2020 United States presidential election in California2020 United States presidential election in Oregon2020 United States presidential election in Washington (state)2020 United States presidential election in Idaho2020 United States presidential election in Nevada2020 United States presidential election in Utah2020 United States presidential election in Arizona2020 United States presidential election in Montana2020 United States presidential election in Wyoming2020 United States presidential election in Colorado2020 United States presidential election in New Mexico2020 United States presidential election in North Dakota2020 United States presidential election in South Dakota2020 United States presidential election in Nebraska2020 United States presidential election in Kansas2020 United States presidential election in Oklahoma2020 United States presidential election in Texas2020 United States presidential election in Minnesota2020 United States presidential election in Iowa2020 United States presidential election in Missouri2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas2020 United States presidential election in Louisiana2020 United States presidential election in Wisconsin2020 United States presidential election in Illinois2020 United States presidential election in Michigan2020 United States presidential election in Indiana2020 United States presidential election in Ohio2020 United States presidential election in Kentucky2020 United States presidential election in Tennessee2020 United States presidential election in Mississippi2020 United States presidential election in Alabama2020 United States presidential election in Georgia2020 United States presidential election in Florida2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina2020 United States presidential election in North Carolina2020 United States presidential election in Virginia2020 United States presidential election in West Virginia2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in New York2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New Hampshire2020 United States presidential election in Maine2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii2020 United States presidential election in Alaska2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege2020.svg
About this image
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census
Senate elections
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 seats of Class II + 2 special elections)
Color coded map of 2020 Senate races
Map of the 2020 Senate races
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent
     Retiring Democratic incumbent      Retiring Republican incumbent
House elections
Seats contestedAll 435 voting-members
All six non-voting delegates
Color coded map of 2020 House of Representatives races
Map of the 2020 House of Representatives elections
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent      Undetermined incumbent
     Retiring or defeated Democratic incumbent
     Retiring or defeated Republican incumbent
     Retiring Libertarian incumbent
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested13 (11 states, two territories)
Color coded map of 2020 gubernatorial races
Map of the 2020 gubernatorial races
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent
     Retiring or term-limited Democrat      Retiring or term-limited Republican
     New Progressive incumbent      Retiring or term-limited non-partisan
      No election

The 2020 United States elections will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. All 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives, 35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate, and the office of president of the United States will be contested. Thirteen state and territorial governorships, as well as numerous other state and local elections, will also be contested.

Each major party will choose a nominee for the 2020 presidential election through a series of Primaries and Caucus, culminating in a national convention held in mid-2020. Incumbent Republican president Donald Trump is seeking re-nomination in the 2020 Republican Party presidential primaries, while Joe Biden is the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee after his sweeping wins in the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries.

Barring vacancies and party-switching, Republicans will enter the 2020 elections with control of 53 of the 100 seats in the Senate, while Democrats will enter the election with control of approximately 235 seats in the House of Representatives.[a] All 33 Class 2 senators are up for election, and two states (Georgia and Arizona) are holding special elections for the Senate. The six non-voting congressional delegates from the District of Columbia and the inhabited U.S. territories will also be elected.

The vast majority of the fifty states will hold regularly-scheduled state legislative elections, and eleven states will hold gubernatorial elections. The outcome of these state elections will have a major impact on the redistricting cycle that will take place following the 2020 United States Census.

Federal elections[edit]

Presidential election[edit]

The United States presidential election of 2020 will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Incumbent Republicans Donald Trump and Mike Pence are both eligible for second terms.[1]

Other parties, including the Democratic Party and various third parties, will also field presidential candidates. Like the Republican primaries, the 2020 Democratic primaries will take place from early 2020 to mid-2020. The Democratic ticket will be nominated at the 2020 Democratic National Convention, held in July 2020. Other parties will conduct various processes to choose their presidential tickets, and independent candidates may also seek the presidency.

The individual who wins a majority of the presidential electoral vote (270 of the 538 electoral votes) will win the presidential election. The current electoral vote distribution was determined by the 2010 census. Each elector is chosen by the states and is charged with casting one vote for president and one vote for vice president. Most states award all their electoral votes to the individual who wins a majority or plurality of that state's popular vote, although two states award electors by congressional districts. If no individual wins a majority of the electoral vote, then the United States House of Representatives will hold a contingent election to determine the winner.[b] The vice president is selected in a similar manner, though a contingent election will be held in the United States Senate if no individual receives a majority of the vice presidential electoral vote.

Congressional elections[edit]

Senate elections[edit]

33 12 2 23 30
33 Democrats
not up
12 Democrats
up
[c] 23 Republicans
up
30 Republicans
not up
Control of Senate seats by class after the 2018 elections
Class Democratic Independent Republican Next
elections
1 21 2 10 2024
2 12 0 21 2020
3 12 0 22 2022
Total 45 2 53

At least 35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate will be up for election. All seats of Senate Class II will be up for election; the winners of those elections will serve six-year terms. Additionally, Arizona and Georgia will hold special elections to a fill Class III Senate vacancies; the winners of those elections will serve two-year terms. Other states may also hold special elections.

Republicans won control of the Senate in the 2014 Senate elections. They retained that majority through the 2016 and 2018 Senate elections. Republicans currently hold 53 Senate seats, Democrats hold 45, and independents hold two. Both independents have caucused with the Democratic Party since joining the Senate. Barring further vacancies or party switching, 21 Republican-held seats, along with 12 Democratic-held seats, will be up for election. If they win the vice presidency, Democrats will need to achieve a net gain of at least three seats to take the majority; otherwise, they will need to achieve a net gain of at least four seats to take the majority.

House of Representatives elections[edit]

All 435 voting seats in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election. The winners of each race will serve a two-year term. Additionally, elections will be held to select the delegate for the District of Columbia as well as the delegates from U.S. territories. This includes the resident commissioner of Puerto Rico, a position with a four-year term.

Democrats won control of the House of Representatives in the 2018 elections, controlling 235 seats while Republicans control 199 seats. One seat is held by an independent.[d] Winning 218 or more seats determines which party is in the majority.

Special elections[edit]

The following special elections will be held to replace a member who resigned or died in office during the 116th U.S. Congress:

State elections[edit]

Gubernatorial elections[edit]

23 5 1 7 20
Democrats Not Up Democrats Up PNP/R Up Republicans Up Republicans Not Up

Elections will be held for the governorships of 11 U.S. states and two U.S. territories. Special elections may be held for vacancies in the other states and territories, if required by respective state/territorial constitutions. Most elections will be for four-year terms, but the governors of New Hampshire and Vermont each serve two-year terms.

Barring vacancies and party switching, Republicans will be defending seven seats, while Democrats will be defending six seats. At least two Democratic incumbents and at least one Republican incumbent will not seek election to another term.

Legislative elections[edit]

Partisan control of states after the 2019 elections.
  Democratic trifecta
  Republican trifecta
  Divided government
  Officially non-partisan legislature

Most states will hold state legislative elections in 2020. Alabama, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia will not hold state legislative elections, Michigan will hold elections only for the lower house, while North Dakota will hold elections only for the upper house. In states that use staggered terms, some state senators will not be up for election. After the 2019 elections, Democrats have 15 trifectas (control of the governor's office and both legislative chambers), Republicans have 20 trifectas, and 14 states have a divided government (Nebraska has a non-partisan legislature).[12][13]

Elections[edit]

Judicial elections[edit]

In 2020, 82 state supreme court seats are up for election in 35 states. This constitutes 24% of all state supreme court seats in the country.

Impact on redistricting[edit]

A census will be conducted in 2020, after which the United States House of Representatives and state legislatures will undergo redistricting, and the state delegations to the United States House of Representatives will undergo reapportionment. In states without redistricting commissions, the legislators and governors elected between 2017 and 2020 will draw the new Congressional and state legislative districts that will take effect starting with the 2022 elections. If either party does well in the 2020 elections, they could gain a significant advantage in electing their candidates to the state legislature and the United States House of Representatives until the next round of redistricting in 2030. State supreme courts can also have a significant effect on redistricting, as demonstrated in Pennsylvania and Virginia.[14]

Local elections[edit]

Mayoral elections[edit]

Incumbent mayors won re-election in major cities during 2020, including Bakersfield, California (Karen Goh[15]), Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Tom Barrett[16]), and Sacramento, California (Darrell Steinberg[17]).

An open mayoral seat was won in Fresno, California (Jerry Dyer[18]).

Mayoral elections remain to be held in many cities, including:[19]

Other elections and referendums[edit]

  • One of Washington, D.C.'s, shadow senators and its shadow representative, who are charged with lobbying Congress for D.C. statehood, are up for election.
  • A California veto referendum funded by the American Bail Coalition PAC will decide whether to uphold SB10, which replaces cash bail with risk assessments for suspects who are detained in jail awaiting trial.
  • A veto referendum in Colorado will decide whether to allow the state to join the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact or retain the traditional membership in the Electoral College in presidential elections.
  • A Florida constitutional amendment initiative seeks to narrow the right to vote in any Florida election exclusively to citizens, replacing language in the state constitution stating "every citizen" has the right to vote with "only a citizen."
  • A Maine veto referendum sought to overturn a new law which eliminates religious and philosophical exemptions from mandatory vaccinations for K-12 and college students and employees of healthcare facilities. It failed by a wide margin on the March primary ballot.
  • Constitutional amendments to remove penal exceptions from state constitutions will be on the ballot in Nebraska and Utah.
  • A legislatively-referred ballot question in New Jersey will allow voters to decide on legalization of recreational cannabis.
  • The legalization of medical marijuana will be on the ballot in South Dakota.

Tribal elections[edit]

A number of Native American tribal governments held elections for tribal leadership in 2020.

The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation reelected President Bernadine Burnette.[23] The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community elected Keith Anderson tribal chairman, replacing the retiring Charlie Vig.[24]

Scheduled elections include:

Impact of coronavirus[edit]

Starting in March 2020, elections across the United States were delayed and disrupted by the novel coronavirus pandemic. As of March 24, 2020, at least 10 states and territories — Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Ohio, Puerto Rico, and Rhode Island — had delayed presidential primaries. In addition, Alabama delayed the Republican primary Senatorial run-off and North Carolina and Mississippi delayed Republican primary run-off for congressional seats.[29] Iowa, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas all delayed municipal elections, and in New York City the special election for Queens borough president was cancelled.[30]

To help enforce social distancing, many states looked to expand absentee and vote-by-mail options for 2020 primary elections and the November general elections.[31] Several elections, including Democratic primaries in Alaska and Hawaiʻi, as well as the Maryland 7th congressional district special election, were conducted entirely with mail-in ballots only.[30]

Beyond the disruption to traditional campaign events, the pandemic has the potential to disrupt the party conventions.[32]

Table of state, territorial, and federal results[edit]

This table shows the partisan results of president, congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2020. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and U.S. Senate elections in 2018. The five territories and Washington, D.C., do not elect members of the U.S. Senate, and the territories do not take part in presidential elections; instead they each elect one non-voting member of the House. Nebraska's unicameral legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are officially non-partisan. In the table, offices/legislatures that are not up for election in 2019 or 2020 are already filled in for the "after 2020 elections" section, although vacancies or party switching could potentially lead to a flip in partisan control.

Subdivision and PVI[33] Before 2020 elections[34][35] After 2020 elections
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House President Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Alabama R+14 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–1 Rep Rep
Alaska R+9 Rep Split Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Arizona R+5 Rep Rep Split Dem 5–4 Rep
Arkansas R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
California D+12 Dem Dem Dem Dem 46–7 Dem Dem
Colorado D+1 Dem Dem Split Dem 4–3 Dem
Connecticut D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0 Dem Dem
Delaware D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0
Florida R+2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 14–13 Rep Rep
Georgia R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 9–5 Rep
Hawaii D+18 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem
Idaho R+19 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep
Illinois D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5 Dem
Indiana R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Iowa R+3 Rep Rep Rep Dem 3–1 Rep
Kansas R+13 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Dem
Kentucky R+15 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem
Louisiana R+11 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep
Maine D+3 Dem Dem Split[e] Dem 2–0 Dem
Maryland D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1 Rep Dem Dem
Massachusetts D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Rep
Michigan D+1 Dem Rep Dem Dem 7–6–1 Dem
Minnesota D+1 Dem Split Dem Dem 5–3 Dem
Mississippi R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep
Missouri R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2 Rep
Montana R+11 Dem Rep Split Rep 1–0
Nebraska R+14 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0 Rep NP
Nevada D+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1 Dem Dem
New Hampshire D+1 Rep Dem Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2 Dem Dem
New Mexico D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–0 Dem
New York D+11 Dem Dem Dem Dem 21–6 Dem Dem
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 9–3
North Dakota R+17 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Ohio R+3 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4 Rep Split
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–1 Rep
Oregon D+5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem
Pennsylvania Even Dem Rep Split Split 9–9 Dem Split
Rhode Island D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–2 Rep
South Dakota R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Texas R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 23–13 Rep
Utah R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep
Vermont D+15 Rep Dem Dem[f] Dem 1–0 Split D/I[f]
Virginia D+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–4 Dem Dem
Washington D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3 Dem
West Virginia R+20 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0
Wisconsin Even Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3 Dem Split
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
United States Even Rep 26–24 Rep 29–19 Rep 53–47[g] Dem
Washington, D.C. D+43 Dem[h] Dem[h] N/A Dem N/A
American Samoa N/A NP/D[i] NP Rep N/A NP NP
Guam Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Rep Ind[j]
Puerto Rico PNP/R[k] PNP PNP/R[l]
U.S. Virgin Islands Dem Dem Dem
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House President Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Subdivision and PVI Before 2020 elections After 2020 elections

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The exact number of Democratic seats will depend on the results of vacancies and special elections that occur prior to November 2020.
  2. ^ In a contingent election, the House of Representatives can choose from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state delegation of the House of Representatives receives one vote. For example, the state delegation of Alabama (consisting of seven representatives) and the state delegation of Alaska (consisting of one representative) each collectively receive one vote.
  3. ^ 2 Independents not up
  4. ^ Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan was first elected as a Republican in 2010. On July 4, 2019, Amash announced he was leaving the GOP and would run as an independent in 2020.
  5. ^ One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  6. ^ a b One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  7. ^ The Democratic Senate caucus currently consists of 45 Democrats and two independents.
  8. ^ a b Washington, D.C., does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council.
  9. ^ Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga has affiliated with the Democratic Party at the national level since re-election in 2016.
  10. ^ The Northern Mariana Islands' delegate to Congress, Gregorio Sablan, was elected as an Independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2009.
  11. ^ Puerto Rican Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced, who became governor after Pedro Pierluisi's succession of Ricardo Rosselló was deemed unconstitutional, is as a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party, but affiliates with the Republican Party at the national level.
  12. ^ Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with the Republicans since taking office in 2017.

References[edit]

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  8. ^ "New York's 27th Congressional District - Ballotpedia". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  9. ^ Brufke, Juliegrace (August 26, 2019). "GOP Rep. Sean Duffy resigning from Congress". The Hill. Washington, D.C. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
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  14. ^ Sarlin, Benjy (August 26, 2014). "Forget 2016: Democrats already have a plan for 2020". MSNBC. Retrieved October 30, 2015.
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  16. ^ Dirr, Alison (April 13, 2020). "Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett easily wins reelection in race against Lena Taylor". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  17. ^ Clift, Theresa (March 3, 2020). "Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg easily re-elected to second term". The Sacramento Bee. Sacramento, California. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  18. ^ Sheehan, Tim (March 11, 2020). "Jerry Dyer will be Fresno's next mayor". The Fresno Bee. Fresno, California. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
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  25. ^ "Election Information". Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians Election Board. Retrieved January 20, 2020.
  26. ^ Chosa, Michael (February 7, 2020). "Leech Lake Tribal Council Certifies Candidates for 2020 Election". Leech Lake News. Cass Lake, Minnesota. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  27. ^ "Tribal Council Representatives". Retrieved January 21, 2020.
  28. ^ "Dr. Aaron A. Payment announces re-election bid as chairperson of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians". Indian Country Today. Washington, D.C. February 11, 2020. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
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