1951 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s
Years: 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1951:

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • U.S. Navy aircraft from the aircraft carriers of Task Force 77 provide support to United Nations troops fighting on the front line in Korea, including long-range interdiction, emergency close air support, and air cover for landings and evacuations.[5]
  • January 1 – The United States Air Force reestablishes the Air Defense Command. It also returns the Air Defense Command to the status of a major command, a status it has not held since December 1948.[6]
  • January 21 – The U.S. Air Force F-84 Thunderjet makes its first kill, when F-84 pilot Lieutenant Colonel William E. Bertram shoots down a MiG-15 during the Korean War.[7]
  • January 31
    • The month ends as the worst for the United Nations forces in Korea in terms of air losses, with 44 U.N. aircraft lost to enemy ground fire alone. More than 600 American aircraft have been lost in air-to-air combat or due to enemy ground fire since the Korean War began in June 1950.[8]
    • On a flight in the privately owned P-51 Mustang Excalibur III to investigate the jet stream, U.S. Navy Captain Charles F. Blair, Jr., sets a record for a piston-engine aircraft by flying nonstop 3,478 miles (5,597 km) from New York City to London, England, in 7 hours 48 minutes at an average speed of 446 mph (718 km/hr).

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • September 13 – The United States Marine Corps '​s first transport helicopter squadron, Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161), conducts history '​s first mass helicopter resupply mission in Operation Windmill I, lifting 18,484 pounds (8,384 kg) of equipment to a U.S. Marine Corps battalion on the front line in Korea and evacuating 74 casualties, all in one hour, using Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters.[38]
  • September 15 – A stunt plane piloted by U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant Norman Jones crashes into the crowd at the Fall Festival Day air show in Flagler, Colorado, when Jones attempts a loop or slow roll (sources differ) from an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters). Jones, six other adults, and 13 children die in the second-deadliest air show accident in U.S. history.[39][40]
  • September 16 – A damaged United States Navy F2H-2 Banshee attempting to land on USS Essex (CV-9) crashes into a group of aircraft parked on the carrier '​s deck, killing seven sailors.
  • September 13 – In Operation Windmill II, Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) lifts 12,180 pounds (5,525 kg) of equipment to a U.S. Marine Corps unit on the front line in Korea in 18 flights over the course of one hour, using Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters.[38]
  • September 21 – In Operation Summit, the U.S. Marine Corps makes the world '​s first mass combat deployment by helicopter, when Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) uses 12 Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters to land 224[38] or 228[41] U.S. Marines and 17,772 pounds (8,061 kg) of equipment onto Hill 844 near Kansong, Korea.[38][41]
  • September 27 – In Operation Blackbird, the U.S. Marine Corps makes the world '​s first nighttime combat troop lift by helicopter and the only large-scale night helicopter lift of the Korean War, when Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) uses Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters to land 223 U.S. Marines in a landing zone in Korea in 2 hours 20 minutes.[42]
  • September 28 – The U.S. Marine Corps loses a transport helicopter operationally for this first time in history when a Sikorsky HRS-1 of Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) is destroyed in a crash during a night training flight in Korea. All three men on board escape without injury.[42]

October[edit]

  • Based on information supplied by Korean guerrillas, eight AD Skyraiders from U.S. Navy Fighter Squadron 54 (VF-54) attack a meeting place of Communist leaders in Kapsan, North Korea, with 1,000-pound (454-kg) bombs and napalm. Intelligence evaluation indicates that 500 Communists are killed.[43][44]
  • A U.S. Navy helicopter from the battleship USS Iowa (BB-61) flies 10 miles (16 km) inland to rescue a downed pilot from the aircraft carrier USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), a very lengthy rescue mission for the time.[45]
  • Communist aircraft inflict significant damage on the Royal Navy frigate HMS Black Swan while she is operating in the Han River in Korea.[46]
  • October 3 – Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 1 (HS-1), the U.S. Navy's first anti-submarine warfare helicopter squadron, is commissioned.
  • October 11 – In Operation Bumble Bee, 12 Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters of Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) relieve an entire U.S. Marine Corps battalion on the front line in Korea, with each helicopter carrying six Marines at a time 15 miles (24 km) to the front and bringing six Marines at a time out to the rear area on the return trip. In under six hours, they transport a total of 958 Marines.[42]
  • October 15 – In Operation Wedge, Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters of the U.S. Marine Corps '​s Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) supply a surrounded South Korean Army unit with 19,000 pounds (8,618 kg) of ammunition and evacuate 24 casualties.[42]
  • October 22 – In Operation Bushbeater, the U.S. Marine Corps makes the first use of vertical envelopment tactics when patrol teams of the 1st Marine Division use 40-foot (12-meter)-long knotted ropes to descend from Sikorsky HRS-1 helicopters of Marine Transport Helicopter Squadron 161 (HMR-161) in Korea. Two of the helicopters lose lift over rough terrain and crash, but no one aboard is injured.[47]
  • October 23 – Ten U.S. Air Force Boeing B-29 Superfortresses attack an airfield in North Korea; three are shot down, four make emergency landings in South Korea, and three badly damaged aircraft return to Okinawa. It is the last daylight combat mission flown by the B-29.
  • October 25 – Japan Airlines launches commercial operations within Japan, using three Northwest Airlines Martin 2-0-2 aircraft flown by Northwest crews.[48]

November[edit]

December[edit]

First flights[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Entered service[edit]

February[edit]

[62]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

October[edit]

December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Crosby, Francis, The Complete Guide to Fighters & Bombers of the World: An Illustrated History of the World '​s Greatest Military Aircraft, From the Pioneering Days of Air Fighting in World War I Through the Jet Fighters and Stealth Bombers of the Present Day, London: Anness Publishing Ltd., 2006, ISBN 978-1-84476-917-9, p. 47.
  2. ^ A History of Coast Guard Aviation: The Growth Years (1939-1956)
  3. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 108.
  4. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 182.
  5. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 220.
  6. ^ Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 12. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. LCCN 61060979. 
  7. ^ Crosby, Francis, The Complete Guide to Fighters & Bombers of the World: An Illustrated History of the World '​s Greatest Military Aircraft, From the Pioneering Days of Air Fighting in World War I Through the Jet Fighters and Stealth Bombers of the Present Day, London: Anness Publishing Ltd., 2006, ISBN 978-1-84476-917-9, p. 37.
  8. ^ a b Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 268.
  9. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 140.
  10. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, pp. 221, 222.
  11. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, pp. 47-48.
  12. ^ Harlan, Chico, "South Korea will expand its air defense zone, Defense Ministry says," washingtonpost.com, December 8, 2013.
  13. ^ [Sang-hun, Choe, "South Korea Announces Expansion of Its Air Defense Zone," nytimes.com, December 8, 2013.]
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  16. ^ a b Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 272.
  17. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 272
  18. ^ a b Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 40.
  19. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 221.
  20. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 272-273.
  21. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 222.
  22. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, pp. 40-41.
  23. ^ a b Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 273.
  24. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 43.
  25. ^ Polmar, Norman, "The Versatile, Durable Skyraider", Naval History, October 2011, p. 16.
  26. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 89.
  27. ^ a b Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 399.
  28. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, pp. 40, 44.
  29. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 116.
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  32. ^ Muir, Malcolm, Jr., Sea Power on Call: Fleet Operations June 1951-July 1953, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2005, ISBN 978-0-945274-53-7, p. 10.
  33. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 48.
  34. ^ Thetford, Owen, British Naval Aircraft Since 1912, Sixth Edition, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 1-55750-076-2, p. 25.
  35. ^ Hallion, Richard P., "Skyrocketing Through Mach 2: How Scott Crossfield Scored Aviation's Double-Sonic Prize," Aviationn History, January 2014, p. 33.
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  37. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, pp. 50.
  38. ^ a b c d Thorson, Craig A., "Marine Chopper Salvage," Aviation History, May 2012, p. 54.
  39. ^ Miniclier, Kit (September 9, 2001). "Air-show crash a vivid memory 50 years later". Denver Post.com. The Denver Post. Retrieved 7 February 2009. 
  40. ^ Beitler, Stu (10 March 2009). "Flagler, CO Disaster At Air Show, Sep 1951". GenDisasters.com. GenDisasters. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  41. ^ a b Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 63.
  42. ^ a b c d Thorson, Craig A., "Marine Chopper Salvage," Aviation History, May 2012, p. 55.
  43. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 52.
  44. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 176.
  45. ^ Muir, Malcolm, Jr., Sea Power on Call: Fleet Operations June 1951-July 1953, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2005, ISBN 978-0-945274-53-7, p. 35.
  46. ^ Muir, Malcolm, Jr., Sea Power on Call: Fleet Operations June 1951-July 1953, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2005, ISBN 978-0-945274-53-7, p. 24.
  47. ^ Thorson, Craig A., "Marine Chopper Salvage," Aviation History, May 2012, pp. 55-57.
  48. ^ http://www.japanair.com/e/aboutjal/history.php (Archived January 4, 2007 at the Wayback Machine)
  49. ^ Thetford, Owen, British Naval Aircraft Since 1912, Sixth Edition, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 1-55750-076-2, p. 105.
  50. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 224.
  51. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 406.
  52. ^ UN Air-to-Air Victories during the Korean War, 1950-1953
  53. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 147.
  54. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 139.
  55. ^ a b c d e f g h Bridgman 1951, p. 6c.
  56. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 189.
  57. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 401.
  58. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 304.
  59. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 978-0-370-10054-8, p. 233.
  60. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 273.
  61. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 348.
  62. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 85.
  63. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 246.
  • Bridgman, Leonard. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1951–52. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company, Ltd, 1951.