1953 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s
Years: 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1953:

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

  • Chilean President Carlos Ibáñez del Campo grants the Chilean Navy the authority to operate helicopters and transport aircraft. It is the first time that the navy has had administrative control over aircraft since 1930.[17]
  • July 1 – The responsibility for air traffic control over West Germany is transferred from the Allies to West German authorities.
  • July 1 – The Aero Vodochody company is formed in Czechoslovakia, carrying on the "Aero" name of Aero Tovarna.[18]
  • July 3 – The first tethered flight by the Rolls-Royce Thrust Measuring Rig VTOL aircraft takes place.
  • July 8 – Sabena begins the first international helicopter services, linking Brussels (Belgium) with destinations in the Netherlands and France.
  • Mid-July – At the request of Rear Admiral Joseph J. "Jocko" Clark, the commander of the U.S. Navy '​s aircraft carrier task force, Task Force 77, off Korea, atomic bombs are placed aboard Task Force 77 carriers as a "precautionary measure," in case they are needed if the Korean War expands into Manchuria.[12]
  • July 17 – Lieutenant Guy P. Bordelon scores his fifth aerial victory, becoming the United States Navy '​s only ace of the Korean War. He had scored all five victories since June 29, using an F4U-5N Corsair night fighter to shoot down North Korean light aircraft making night harassment raids.[19]
  • July 23 – A U.S. Navy fleet-record 61,000th landing takes place aboard the aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV-21) off Korea.[20]
  • July 24–26 – Operating off the east coast of Korea, the U.S. Navy attack aircraft carriers USS Boxer, USS Lake Champlain (CVA-39), USS Philippine Sea (CVA-47), and USS Princeton (CVA-37), supporting United Nations ground forces, break records for the number of sorties flown with the highest sortie rates of the Korean War. They average 170 sorties per day, and Princeton aircraft fly 184 sorties on one day.[21][22]
  • July 27
    • Aircraft from the aircraft carriers of U.S. Navy Task Force 77 attack airfields in North Korea. Since July 1, U.S. Navy carrier aircraft have flown 6,423 sorties over Korea, and aircraft ordnance tonnage has doubled since May 1.[20]
    • Hours before the armistice that ends the Korean War, U.S. Air Force pilot Ralph S. Parr, flying an F-86 Sabre, scores the final aerial victory of the war, shooting down a Soviet Ilyushin Il-12 (NATO reporting name "Coach") cargo aircraft in restricted airspace over North Korea. It is his 10th victory, all of them scored during 30 missions flown in the last seven weeks of the war, tying him with five other pilots for total kills during the conflict. The Soviet Union claims the Il-12 was a civilian aircraft carrying VIPs, but Parr claims it was marked with a military red star.[14]
    • The Korean War ends. During the war, the U.S. Navy has flown 276,000 combat sorties – only 7,000 fewer than it had in all of World War II – and dropped 177,000 short tons (160,573 metric tons) of bombs – 77,000 short tons (67,132 metric tons) more than it did during all of World War II. It has lost 1,248 aircraft, 564 of them (including 302 F4U Corsairs and 124 AD Skyraiders) to enemy action. Since mid-1951, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps combined have lost 384 tactical aircraft to enemy ground fire, including 193 Corsairs and 102 Skyraiders. A typical U.S. Navy carrier air wing has lost 10 percent of its aircrew during its deployment to Korea.[23] Aircraft of the British Royal Navy '​s Fleet Air Arm have flown over 20,000 carrier sorties during the war.[24]
  • July 28 – Two B-47 Stratojet bombers of the U.S. Air Force '​s 305th Bombardment Wing set speed records, when one flies from RCAF Goose Bay, Labrador, to RAF Fairford, England, in 4 hours 14 minutes and the other flies from Limestone Air Force Base, Maine, to RAF Fairford in 4 hours 45 minutes.

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • December 12 – Flying the Bell X-1A, Chuck Yeager reaches an altitude of 22,280 meters (74,700 feet), where he sets a new world speed record of Mach 2.44, equal to 2,608 km/hr (1,620 mph) at that altitude, in level flight.

First flights[edit]

January[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

December[edit]

Entered service[edit]

January[edit]

Retirements[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ICAO statement, 29 December 1953.
  2. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 194.
  3. ^ Muir, Malcolm, Jr., Sea Power on Call: Fleet Operations June 1951-July 1953, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2005, ISBN 0-945274-53-X, p. 35.
  4. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 280.
  5. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 182.
  6. ^ Barnes, Bart, "Daredevil pilot Mira Slovak, who escaped Iron Curtain during Cold War, dies at 84," washingtonpost.com, June 28, 2014.
  7. ^ "Mira Slovak Dies at 84". AOPA Pilot: 30. September 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c Hallion, Richard P., "Skyrocketing Through Mach 2: How Scott Crossfield Scored Aviation's Double-Sonic Prize," Aviation History, January 2014, p. 34.
  9. ^ a b Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 400.
  10. ^ Guttman, Jon, "Aces High," MHQ – The Quarterly Journal of Military History, Winter 2013, p. 16.
  11. ^ Daniel, Clifton, ed., Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 734.
  12. ^ a b Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 276.
  13. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 147.
  14. ^ a b c Bernstein, Adam, "Retired Air Force Colonel Ralph S. Parr, a Highly Decorated Pilot, Dies at 88," The Washington Post, December 20, 2012, p. B7.
  15. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 174.
  16. ^ Chronology of Significant Events in Naval Aviation: "Naval Air Transport" 1941 -- 1999
  17. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 200.
  18. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 71.
  19. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 61.
  20. ^ a b Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 278.
  21. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 64.
  22. ^ Muir, Malcolm, Jr., Sea Power on Call: Fleet Operations June 1951-July 1953, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2005, ISBN 0-945274-53-X, p. 21.
  23. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, pp. 269, 279-280.
  24. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 253.
  25. ^ globalsecurity.org F4D (F-6A) Skyray
  26. ^ a b Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 190.
  27. ^ a b Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 352.
  28. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 592.
  29. ^ Crosby, Francis, The Complete Guide to Fighters & Bombers of the World: An Illustrated History of the World '​s Greatest Military Aircraft, From the Pioneering Days of Air Fighting in World War I Through the Jet Fighters and Stealth Bombers of the Present Day, London: Hermes House, 2006, ISBN 9781846810008, p. 264.
  30. ^ Hallon, Richard P., "Skyrocketing Through Mach 2: How Scott Crossfield Scored Aviation's Double-Sonic Prize," Aviation History, January 2014, pp. 30, 35.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Bridgman 1953, p. 40.
  32. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 0-370-10054-9, p. 413.
  33. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 104.
  34. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 350.
  35. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 100.
  36. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 95.
  37. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 282.
  38. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 305.
  39. ^ Hallon, Richard P., "Skyrocketing Through Mach 2: How Scott Crossfield Scored Aviation's Double-Sonic Prize," Aviation History, January 2014, p. 36.
  40. ^ Polmar, Norman, "The Really Big One," Naval History, December 2013, p. 65.
  41. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 341.
  • Bridgman, Leonard. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953–54. London: Jane's All The World's Aircraft Publishing Co. Ltd., 1953.