KYOT-FM

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For the French poet, see Kyot.
KYOT-FM
City of license Phoenix, Arizona
Broadcast area Phoenix metropolitan area
Branding 95.5 The Mountain
Slogan We Play Everything
Frequency 95.5 MHz (also on HD Radio)95.5HD2 Smooth Jazz
First air date October 31, 1963 (as KRFM)
Format Adult Hits
ERP 100,000 watts
HAAT 479 meters
Class C
Facility ID 18648
Callsign meaning Kid CoYOTe (previous branding)
Former callsigns KRFM (1963-1978)
KQYT (1978-1986)
KOY-FM (1986-1993)
Owner iHeartMedia, Inc.
Sister stations KESZ, KFYI, KGME, KMXP, KNIX, KOY, KZZP
Webcast Listen Live
Website 955themountain.com

KYOT-FM (95.5 FM, "The Mountain") is a commercial adult hits music radio station located in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, broadcasting on 95.5 FM. Its studios are located in Phoenix near Sky Harbor Airport and its transmitter is in South Mountain Park.

Despite the station's branding, there is no affiliation of any kind with the Phoenix Coyotes, the local National Hockey League team. (The KYOT call letters came before the Winnipeg Jets moved to Phoenix and became the Coyotes in the late 1990s.)

History[edit]

In 1963, KRFM signed on with an easy listening music format. In the late-1970s, the call letters were changed to KQYT, retaining its easy listening music format.

On July 10, 1986, the format was changed to adult top 40, branded as "The New Y 95 FM". The call letters were changed to "KOY-FM". The station later evolved to a top 40 music format. The station gained some national attention in the late 1980s when they hired Jessica Hahn, a central figure in the Jim Bakker PTL scandal, as an on-air DJ. The station also helped to start the careers of Arizona disk jockeys Tim Hattrick and Glenn Beck. The station competed heavily against KKFR (then at 92.3 FM, now on 98.3) and KZZP, and Phoenix was considered to be the best market for fans of Top 40. However, due to the changing nature of the format in the late 1980s and early 1990s in terms of musical tastes, personalities and personnel changes, KZZP flipped to the then-new Hot AC format in April 1991, leaving KKFR and KOY-FM to battle for themselves. However, despite KOY-FM picking up a good percentage of KZZP's former audience, the station dropped in the ratings, well below KKFR, which moved towards a more upbeat, rhythmic direction to compete against KOY-FM's own rhythmic/dance direction. To combat this, in late 1992, KOY-FM began a "dayparting" approach, by playing more safe and mainstream pop/rock content during the day, and less mainstream hip hop/rock/dance product at night. However, a few months later, the station reverted back to its previous sound. With all the changes, the station continued to deteriorate in the ratings.

On September 2, 1993, at Noon, the station began stunting, airing loops of quotes from famous people and figures from American pop culture and history, branded as "America's Radio Museum". The following day, the station flipped to a "rhythm and rock" format branded as "The Coyote". A change of call letters to KYOT followed to match its new branding.

In March 1994, the format was changed to a successful smooth jazz format, but retaining its branding as "The Coyote", with actor Geoffrey Holder providing the station's voice-over during its tenure. Nick Francis, previously the program director of KKNW in Seattle and the music director of KKSF in San Francisco, programmed KYOT to a ratings height of #1 12+ at one point in the late 1990s.

At the time it changed to smooth jazz, KYOT was owned by Sundance Communications. Several ownership changes in the late 1990s would see KYOT become a property of Colfax, Chancellor, AMFM and eventually Clear Channel (now iheartmedia) in 2000.

Between 2000 and 2010, KYOT maintained strong 12+ ratings, but eventually saw a similar aging of the audience that other smooth jazz stations experienced. Francis' role as program director was downsized, and the smooth jazz format of KYOT never regained its dominance.

In 2010, the station began mixing some soft adult contemporary music into the mix, similar to what was being done at KTWV in Los Angeles. By January 2011, KYOT was playing less smooth jazz and more AC-sounding pop/R&B recurrents and classic/old school recordings. In June 2011, KYOT was officially moved to rhythmic adult contemporary, playing mostly rhythmic pop/R&B hits from the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s.

On August 31, 2011, KYOT was rebranded as "The New Eva 95.5" named after actress Eva Longoria of ABC's longest running series "Desperate Housewives", playing rhythmic oldies. By October 2013, KYOT shifted to a Rhythmic AC direction by adding current Rhythmic Pop and R&B material to its selection while maintaining a majority of older Rhythmic product.

On January 10, 2014, at 5 PM, KYOT changed their format to adult hits (filling the format void after KPKX flipped to sports earlier that week), branded as "95.5 The Mountain."[1] The final song on "Eva" was "End of the Road" by Boyz II Men, while the first song on "The Mountain" was "You Give Love a Bad Name" by Bon Jovi.

HD radio[edit]

KYOT's HD radio signal is multiplexed. The main signal is a simulcast of The Mountain's Adult Hits format. The second channel carries smooth jazz, a format previously used when the station was branded as "The Coyote". There are no commercials and the voice-overs from Holder have been removed.

Former Logos[edit]

KYOT.png

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°20′06″N 112°03′43″W / 33.335°N 112.062°W / 33.335; -112.062