Ship Bottom, New Jersey

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Ship Bottom, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Ship Bottom
Motto: "Gateway to Long Beach Island"
Map of Ship Bottom in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Ship Bottom in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Ship Bottom, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Ship Bottom, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°38′43″N 74°10′59″W / 39.645354°N 74.183003°W / 39.645354; -74.183003Coordinates: 39°38′43″N 74°10′59″W / 39.645354°N 74.183003°W / 39.645354; -74.183003[1][2]
Country United States
state New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated March 3, 1925 as Ship Bottom-Beach Arlington
Renamed 1947 as Ship Bottom
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor William Huelsenbeck (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator T. Richard Bethea[4]
 • Clerk Kathleen Wells[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.001 sq mi (2.592 km2)
 • Land 0.713 sq mi (1.847 km2)
 • Water 0.288 sq mi (0.745 km2)  28.73%
Area rank 498th of 566 in state
23rd of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 1,156
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 1,158
 • Rank 528th of 566 in state
29th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density 1,620.6/sq mi (625.7/km2)
 • Density rank 322nd of 566 in state
16th of 33 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08008 - Beach Haven[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3402967110[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885394[18][2]
Website www.shipbottom.org

Ship Bottom is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,156,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 228 (-16.5%) from the 1,384 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 32 (+2.4%) from the 1,352 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The borough is located on Long Beach Island and borders the Atlantic Ocean.

What is now Ship Bottom was originally incorporated as the borough of Ship Bottom-Beach Arlington by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1925, from portions of Long Beach Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 23, 1925. The borough name was shortened to Ship Bottom in 1947.[20]

The borough is known as the "Gateway to Long Beach Island", as Route 72 provides the sole road access from Manahawkin in Stafford Township, ending in Ship Bottom as it crosses Manahawkin Bay via the Manahawkin Bay Bridge (formally known as the Dorland J. Henderson Memorial Bridge).

Geography[edit]

Ship Bottom is located at 39°38′43″N 74°10′59″W / 39.645354°N 74.183003°W / 39.645354; -74.183003 (39.645354,-74.183003). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.001 square miles (2.592 km2), of which, 0.713 square miles (1.847 km2) of it is land and 0.288 square miles (0.745 km2) of it (28.73%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 277
1940 396 43.0%
1950 533 34.6%
1960 717 34.5%
1970 1,079 50.5%
1980 1,427 32.3%
1990 1,352 −5.3%
2000 1,384 2.4%
2010 1,156 −16.5%
Est. 2012 1,158 [11] 0.2%
Population sources:
1930-2000[21] 1930[22]
1930-1990[23] 2000[24][25] 2010[7][8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,156 people, 555 households, and 329.1 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,620.6 per square mile (625.7 /km2). There were 2,066 housing units at an average density of 2,896.3 per square mile (1,118.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.91% (1,074) White, 1.30% (15) Black or African American, 0.17% (2) Native American, 0.43% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.98% (46) from other races, and 1.21% (14) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.17% (106) of the population.[8]

There were 555 households, of which 13.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.7% were non-families. 32.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.60.[8]

In the borough, 12.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 20.2% from 25 to 44, 32.0% from 45 to 64, and 28.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 54.2 years. For every 100 females there were 104.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $60,673 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,872) and the median family income was $97,841 (+/- $19,072). Males had a median income of $51,641 (+/- $9,381) versus $33,580 (+/- $4,778) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,184 (+/- $4,936). About 5.4% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[26]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,384 people, 664 households, and 395 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,991.1 people per square mile (763.4/km2). There were 2,218 housing units at an average density of 3,191.0 per square mile (1,223.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.32% White, 0.29% African American, 0.72% Native American, 0.87% Asian, 1.08% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.78% of the population.[24][25]

There were 664 households out of which 14.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.3% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 35.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.65.[24][25]

In the borough the population was spread out with 14.8% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 29.7% from 45 to 64, and 26.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.2 males.[24][25]

The median income for a household in the borough was $42,098, and the median income for a family was $60,417. Males had a median income of $36,382 versus $28,958 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,870. About 4.1% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.0% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.[24][25]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Ship Bottom is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] Each Council member chairs a committee that oversees a department: Revenue and Finance; Public Safety; Water/Sewer; Parks and Recreation; Public Property and Community Affairs; and Public Works.[27]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Ship Bottom Borough is Republican William Huelsenbeck, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2014. Members of the Ship Bottom Borough Council (with party, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Council President Edward English (R, 2014; Parks & Recreation), Dr. Robert Gleason (R, 2015; Public Buildings and Community Affairs), David Hartman, (R, 2012; Finance), Peter J. Rossi, Jr. (R, 2015; Public Works), Richard J. Sinopoli (R, 2013; Water/Sewer) and Tom Tallon (R, 2013; Public Safety).[28][29][30][31]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Ship Bottom is located in the 2nd Congressional District[32] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[9][33][34] Prior to the 2010 Census, Ship Bottom had been part of the 3rd Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[35]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[36] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[37][38] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[39][40]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[41] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[42] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[43]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[44] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[45] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[46] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[47] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[48] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[49][50][51] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[52][53] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[54][55][56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 988 registered voters in Ship Bottom, of which 142 (14.4%) were registered as Democrats, 497 (50.3%) were registered as Republicans and 349 (35.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[57] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 85.5% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 97.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[57][58]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.2% of the vote here (419 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.3% (295 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (10 votes), among the 732 ballots cast by the borough's 1,036 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.7%.[59] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 57.3% of the vote here (449 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 41.5% (325 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (7 votes), among the 784 ballots cast by the borough's 1,084 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.3.[60]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 63.2% of the vote here (349 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 29.2% (161 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.8% (32 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (5 votes), among the 552 ballots cast by the borough's 1,005 registered voters, yielding a 54.9% turnout.[61]

Education[edit]

For kindergarten through sixth grade, public school students attend the Long Beach Island Consolidated School District, which also serves students from Barnegat Light, Harvey Cedars, Long Beach Township and Surf City.[5][62] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Ethel Jacobsen School[64] in Surf City with 118 students in grades Kindergarten – 2 and Long Beach Island Grade School[65] in Ship Bottom with 113 students in grades 3 – 6.[66]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the Southern Regional School District, which serves the five municipalities in the Long Beach Island Consolidated School District, along with students from Beach Haven and Stafford Township, as well as students from Ocean Township (including its Waretown section) who attend as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[5][67] (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[68]) are Southern Regional Middle School[69] (grades 7 and 8; 1,008 students) and Southern Regional High School[70] (grades 9 – 12; 2,023 students).[71] Both schools are in the Manahawkin section of Stafford Township.

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 18.57 miles (29.89 km) of roadways, of which 13.32 miles (21.44 km) are maintained by the municipality, 4.65 miles (7.48 km) by Ocean County and 0.60 miles (0.97 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[72]

The eastern terminus of Route 72 is in Ship Bottom, which connects the borough to the Manahawkin section of Stafford Township via the Manahawkin Bay Bridge (formally known as the Dorland J. Henderson Memorial Bridge).[73]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Ship Bottom include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b 2012 Calendar and Special Information, Borough of Ship Bottom. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Ship Bottom, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b "DataUniverse - 2010 Census Populations - Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Ship Bottom borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Ship Bottom borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Ship Bottom, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Ship Bottom, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 30, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 205. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  22. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed July 9, 2012. Listed as Barnegat City.
  23. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Ship Bottom borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  25. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Ship Bottom borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  26. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Ship Bottom borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  27. ^ Main page, Borough of Ship Bottom. Accessed July 12, 2006.
  28. ^ Mayor & Borough Council, Borough of Ship Bottom. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  29. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Ship Bottom. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  30. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 11. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  31. ^ Borough of Ship Bottom, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  32. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  37. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  39. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  40. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  42. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  45. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  46. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  47. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  48. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  49. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  50. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  58. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  59. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  60. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  61. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  62. ^ Study of School Consolidation Long Beach Island, New Jersey, by LAN Associates, January 21, 2011, for Long Beach Island Consolidated School District. Accessed September 25, 2013. "The Long Beach Island Consolidated School District serves the needs of the citizens of Long Beach Island including the communities of Barnegat Light Borough, Long Beach Township, Harvey Cedars Borough, Surf City Borough, and Ship Bottom Borough. The remaining community of Beach Haven at the south end of the island currently has its own school.The Long Beach Island Consolidated Schools serve children from the age of pre-school through sixth grade after which the students attend Southern Regional High School in Manahawkin."
  63. ^ School Data for the Long Beach Island School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  64. ^ Ethel Jacobsen School, Long Beach Island Consolidated School District. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  65. ^ Long Beach Island Grade School, Long Beach Island Consolidated School District. Accessed August 24, 2013.
  66. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Long Beach Island Consolidated School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  67. ^ Southern Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 25, 2013. "Situated in Manahawkin, the Southern Regional School District draws from the constituent districts of Long Beach Township, Beach Haven, Surf City, Ship Bottom, Barnegat Light, Harvey Cedars and Stafford Township, as well as the tuition sending district of Ocean Township (Waretown)."
  68. ^ School Data for the Southern Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  69. ^ Southern Regional Middle School, Southern Regional School District. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  70. ^ Southern Regional High School, Southern Regional School District. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  71. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Southern Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 25, 2013.
  72. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  73. ^ Route 72 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, February 2009. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  74. ^ Matt Kmosko, Columbus Crew. Accessed August 14, 2007.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Surf City
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
North Beach Haven