Mantoloking, New Jersey

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Mantoloking, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Mantoloking
Map of Mantoloking in Ocean County. Inset; Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Mantoloking in Ocean County. Inset; Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mantoloking, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mantoloking, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°03′25″N 74°03′00″W / 40.056853°N 74.049895°W / 40.056853; -74.049895Coordinates: 40°03′25″N 74°03′00″W / 40.056853°N 74.049895°W / 40.056853; -74.049895[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated April 10, 1911
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor George C. Nebel (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Irene H. Ryan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.643 sq mi (1.666 km2)
 • Land 0.385 sq mi (0.998 km2)
 • Water 0.258 sq mi (0.668 km2)  40.08%
Area rank 534th of 566 in state
31st of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 296
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 297
 • Rank 560th of 566 in state
33rd of 33 in county[11]
 • Density 767.9/sq mi (296.5/km2)
 • Density rank 409th of 566 in state
22nd of 33 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08738[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402943380[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885290[17][2]
Website www.mantoloking.org

Mantoloking is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough had a total population of 296,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 127 (-30.0%) from the 423 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 89 (+26.6%) from the 334 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The borough has an estimated summer population of approximately 5,000.[19]

As of the 2000 Census, Mantoloking was the wealthiest community in the state of New Jersey with a per capita money income of $114,017 as of 1999, an increase of 29.8% from the $87,830 recorded in 1989.[20] It was ranked as the 15th highest-income place in the United States.[citation needed] In the Forbes magazine 2012 rankings of "America's Most Expensive ZIP Codes", the borough was ranked 139th, with a median price of $1,403,349.[21]

Mantoloking was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 10, 1911, from portions of Brick Township.[22] The name Mantoloking is derived from the Unami language of the Lenni Lenape Native Americans who once inhabited New Jersey. Various meanings have been attributed to the community's name including "frog ground" or "sand place".[23]

The borough is a Jersey Shore community situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, also known as Barnegat Bay Island, a long, narrow barrier island that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. The town is linked to the New Jersey-mainland via the Mantoloking Bridge, linking the town with Brick Township across the Barnegat Bay. Mantoloking is home to the Olympic-champion producing Mantoloking Yacht Club. Many houses in Mantoloking are of Shingle style architecture and seashore colonial designs with cedar shakes and white trim; popular in places like Cape Cod, Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard and Newport. Some old "summer cottages" in town were designed by world-renowned architect Stanford White of McKim, Mead and White fame. Together with Bay Head to the north, Mantoloking is considered part of the Jersey Shore's "Gold Coast".[24] It is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.[25][26]

During Hurricane Sandy in 2012, storm surge damaged about 90% of the properties in Mantoloking with the largest damage occurring when a breach was formed between the Barnegat Bay and the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Herbert Street (CR 528).[27]

Geography[edit]

Mantoloking is located at 40°03′25″N 74°03′00″W / 40.056853°N 74.049895°W / 40.056853; -74.049895 (40.056853,-74.049895). According to the United States Census Bureau, Mantoloking borough had a total area of 0.643 square mile (1.666 km2), of which, 0.385 square mile (0.998 km2) of it was land and 0.258 square mile (0.668 km2) of it (40.08%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 37
1930 37 0.0%
1940 58 56.8%
1950 72 24.1%
1960 160 122.2%
1970 319 99.4%
1980 433 35.7%
1990 334 −22.9%
2000 423 26.6%
2010 296 −30.0%
Est. 2012 297 [10] 0.3%
Population sources:
1920-2000[28] 1920[29] 1920-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 296 people, 162 households, and 103 families residing in the borough. The population density was 767.9 per square mile (296.5 /km2). There were 535 housing units at an average density of 1,387.9 per square mile (535.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.93% (281) White, 1.69% (5) Black or African American, 0.34% (1) Native American, 0.34% (1) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.36% (7) from other races, and 0.34% (1) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.36% (7) of the population.[7]

There were 162 households, of which 3.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.6% were married couples living together, 3.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.4% were non-families. 35.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 21.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.77 and the average family size was 2.16.[7]

In the borough, 4.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 2.4% from 18 to 24, 6.8% from 25 to 44, 39.2% from 45 to 64, and 47.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 64.4 years. For every 100 females there were 83.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $151,667 (with a margin of error of +/- $66,768) and the median family income was $200,833 (+/- $146,466). Males had a median income of $98,333 (+/- $210,103) versus $42,917 (+/- $32,621) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $97,938 (+/- $40,847). About 0.0% of families and 0.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 423 people, 207 households, and 140 families residing in the borough. The population density was 958.6 people per square mile (371.2/km2). There were 522 housing units at an average density of 1,183.0 per square mile (458.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.64% White, 1.65% African American, 0.47% Asian, 0.24% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.71% of the population.[32][33]

There were 207 households out of which 11.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.8% were married couples living together, 3.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.9% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.02 and the average family size was 2.45.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 10.2% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 10.6% from 25 to 44, 39.2% from 45 to 64, and 36.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 58 years. For every 100 females there were 96.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $105,841, and the median income for a family was $125,000. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $64,167 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $114,017. None of the families and 0.8% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 2.2% of those over 64.[32][33]

History[edit]

Hurricane Sandy[edit]

Breach of the barrier island in Mantoloking after Hurricane Sandy

When Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New Jersey on October 29, 2012, the effects of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey were severe, and Mantoloking was especially hard hit, with more than 50 homes requiring demolition,[35] accounting for almost 10% of the housing units in the borough as of the 2010 Census.[7] Verizon Communications announced in July 2013 that it won't rebuild its copper-wire based plain old telephone service to Mantoloking residents, instead providing them with its Voice Link wireless service, an effort that brought protests from the AARP. Residents have complained that many calls don't go through when dialed, that fax transmissions can't be made, that 911 calls may be affected by network bottlenecks and that power outages would result in the loss of service.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mantoloking is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Mantoloking is George C. Nebel (R, term ends on December 31, 2014). Members of the Borough Council are Council President Evan S. "Steve" Gillingham (R, 2015), James J. Brown (R, 2014), Robert S. McIntyre, Jr. (R, 2015), Beth Nelson (R, 2013), Donald S. Ness (R, 2013) and Peter R. Strohm (D, 2014).[38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mantoloking is located in the 3rd Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[8][42][43] Prior to the 2010 Census, Mantoloking had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[44]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[48][49]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 10th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River Township) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River Township) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township).[50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[53] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[54] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[55] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[56] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[57] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[58][59][60] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[61][62] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[63][64][65]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 324 registered voters in Mantoloking, of which 23 (7.1%) were registered as Democrats, 247 (76.2%) were registered as Republicans and 54 (16.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 109.5% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 114.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[66][67]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 73.3% of the vote here (195 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 24.8% (66 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (3 votes), among the 266 ballots cast by the borough's 341 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0%.[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 75.5% of the vote here (200 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 22.3% (59 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (5 votes), among the 265 ballots cast by the borough's 355 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.6.[69]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 80.9% of the vote here (174 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 12.1% (26 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.0% (13 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (1 votes), among the 215 ballots cast by the borough's 336 registered voters, yielding a 64.0% turnout.[70]

Education[edit]

Students in Mantoloking attend public school in Point Pleasant Beach as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Point Pleasant Beach School District.[71]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mantoloking include:

  • Dr. Britton Chance (1913–2010), Eldridge Reeves Johnson University Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Biophysics, as well as Professor Emeritus of Physical Chemistry and Radiological Physics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. At the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Dr. Chance won a gold medal in sailing.[72]
  • Britton Chance, Jr. (1940-2012), yacht designer.[73]
  • Donald DiFrancesco (born 1944), former Acting Governor of the State of New Jersey and former President of the New Jersey State Senate, who spends summers here with his family.[74]
  • James Gandolfini (1961-2013), actor who summered in Mantoloking, both in his childhood and as an adult.[75]
  • Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003), Oscar, Emmy, and Tony Award-winning actress who owned a summer home on the Mantoloking oceanfront.[76]
  • Robert J. Morris (1915–1997), anti-Communist crusader, U.S. Senate candidate, President of the University of Dallas, founder of the University of Plano, founder of the Defenders of American Liberties and lecturer.[77]
  • Richard Nixon (1913–1994), former Vice President and President of the United States of America who summered here when he was Vice President.[76]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Mantoloking. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 53.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Mantoloking, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mantoloking borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mantoloking borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mantoloking, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mantoloking, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  19. ^ Reiss, Fraidy; Michels, Chesea; and Patberg, Zach. "Tide of humanity rises in summer, ebbs each fall", Asbury Park Press, August 9, 2007. Accessed August 9, 2012. "he only thing that has changed in Mantoloking during the 18 years that Borough Councilman John Jones has lived there is the size of the houses, he said.... The year-round population remains about 450, while the summertime numbers still swell to about 5,000, Jones said."
  20. ^ Money Income (1989 and 1999) and Poverty (1999) New Jersey, Counties and Municipalities, New Jersey State Data Center, April 2003. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  21. ^ Brennan, Morgan. "America's Most Expensive Zip Codes 2012", Forbes, October 16, 2012. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 204. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  23. ^ History, Borough of Mantoloking. Accessed August 16, 2012. "According to Donald W. Becker’s book Indian Places in New Jersey, Mantoloking translates into “frog ground,” with a secondary meaning of “sand place.”"
  24. ^ Ortiz, Erik. "Shore home sales show signs of life in New Jersey / with list of most expensive sales", The Press of Atlantic City, October 4, 2009. Accessed November 4, 2012."Mantoloking in Ocean County, which has only about 450 year-round residents and belongs to an exclusive part of the shore called the 'Gold Coast,' had the highest median home value of $3.2 million."
  25. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  26. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  27. ^ Funderburk, Kristi (July 11, 2013). "N.J. town 'still looks like Beirut' 8 months after Sandy". Asbury Park Press. Retrieved June 8, 2014. 
  28. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  29. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mantoloking borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mantoloking borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mantoloking borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  35. ^ Funderburk, Kristi. "Sandy cleanup continues in Mantoloking; 'still looks like Beirut'50 homes demolished so far", Asbury Park Press, July 11, 2013. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  36. ^ Wyatt, Edward. 'On a New Jersey Islet, Twilight of the Landline", The New York Times, October 14, 2013. Accessed October 14, 2013. "Hurricane Sandy devastated this barrier island community of multimillion-dollar homes, but in Peter Flihan’s view, Verizon Communications has delivered a second blow: the telecommunications giant did not rebuild the landlines destroyed in the storm, and traditional telephone service here has now gone the way of the telegraph."
  37. ^ via Associated Press. "AARP objects to Verizon plan not to bring landline phone service back to Mantoloking", The Record (Bergen County), July 31, 2013. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Minutes of the Organization Business Meeting January 6, 2013, Borough of Mantoloking, February 3, 2013. Accessed August 7, 2013. "Borough Clerk, Irene Ryan administered the oath of office for council members Councilman Steve Gillingham and Councilman Robert S. McIntyre, Jr. for a three-year term to expire on December 31, 2015.... Councilwoman Nelson motioned to nominate Councilman Gillingham as Council President for 2013. The motion was seconded by Councilman Brown and approved by unanimous voice vote."
  39. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 7. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Borough of Mantoloking, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  46. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  49. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 27, 2014.
  51. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  63. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  64. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  65. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  66. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  67. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  69. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  70. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  71. ^ Pleasant Beach School District 2013 School Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 5, 2013. "The Point Pleasant Beach School District is one of the oldest and finest at the Shore. Our school is rich in history and tradition. In addition to serving the students of Point Pleasant Beach and Mantoloking the district serves the high school age students of Bay Head and Lavallette."
  72. ^ Staff. "HIRONDELLE LEADS IN CLASS E TRAILS; Barnegat Bay Yacht Scores in First Race With Ghost by 19 Minutes 12 Seconds", The New York Times, July 20, 1937. Accessed March 19, 2011. "The start today saw both craft get off on even terms but it was not long before the Hirondelle, with Britton Chance of Mantoloking at the helm..."
  73. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Britton Chance Jr., Designer of America’s Cup Boats, Dies at 72", The New York Times, October 18, 2012. Accessed November 4, 2012. "Mr. Chance was born in Philadelphia on June 12, 1940, and grew up in Mantoloking, N.J., on Barnegat Bay, where he spent much of his childhood on the water. "
  74. ^ Strauss, Robert. "Where Sun Eclipses Stars", The New York Times, July 14, 2002. Accessed December 30, 2012. "Former Acting Gov. Donald DiFrancesco summers in Mantoloking."
  75. ^ Nark, Jason. "In Mantoloking, the well-to-do face grim reality", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 21, 2012. Accessed June 23, 2013. "Gandolfini, a lifelong Jersey resident, said he grew up vacationing in Mantoloking and nearby Lavalette and even worked in Seaside Heights. He still rents a place in Mantoloking, near his sister, for two weeks every summer and doesn't expect that to change."
  76. ^ a b Stansfield, Charles A. "Vacationing on the Jersey Shore", via Google Books, p. 130, Stackpole Books, 2004. ISBN 0-8117-2970-2. Accessed November 28, 2008.
  77. ^ Hays, Constance L. "Robert J. Morris Is Dead at 82; Crusader Against Communists", The New York Times, January 2, 1997. Accessed November 4, 2012. "Robert J. Morris, whose ministrations as counsel for a Cold War Senate subcommittee bent on rooting out Communists marked a long career devoted to conservative causes, died on Sunday at Point Pleasant Hospital in Point Pleasant, N.J. He was 82 and lived in Mantoloking, N.J."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bay Head
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Brick Township