Stone Harbor, New Jersey

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Stone Harbor, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Stone Harbor
Stone Harbor Borough highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Stone Harbor Borough highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stone Harbor, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Stone Harbor, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°02′30″N 74°46′08″W / 39.04167°N 74.768777°W / 39.04167; -74.768777Coordinates: 39°02′30″N 74°46′08″W / 39.04167°N 74.768777°W / 39.04167; -74.768777[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Cape May
Incorporated April 28, 1914
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Suzanne M. Walters (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Jill Gougher[4]
 • Clerk Suzanne C. Stanford[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.962 sq mi (5.081 km2)
 • Land 1.398 sq mi (3.620 km2)
 • Water 0.564 sq mi (1.461 km2)  28.76%
Area rank 415th of 566 in state
11th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 866
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 847
 • Rank 541st of 566 in state
14th of 16 in county[12]
 • Density 619.6/sq mi (239.2/km2)
 • Density rank 423rd of 566 in state
11th of 16 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08247[13][14]
Area code(s) 609 Exchanges: 368, 967[15]
FIPS code 3400971010[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885410[18][2]
Website www.stone-harbor.nj.us

Stone Harbor is a borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, United States, that is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area. It occupies the southern portion of Seven Mile Island together with its northern neighbor Avalon. It is a resort community for visitors enjoying beaches, sailing facilities and a thriving commercial center. Most vacationers come from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Maryland, and Delaware. The borough has a summer population in excess of 20,000,[19] and a year-round population of 866, according to the 2010 United States Census.[8][9][10]

The New York Times describes Stone Harbor as a place of "gleaming McMansions and elegant shops",[20] with an average single-family home selling for $2.5 million in 2008.[21] In 2006, Forbes magazine ranked Stone Harbor (ZIP code 08247) as #47 on its list of the most expensive ZIP codes in the United States, based on median home sale prices.[22] As of 2001, Worth magazine ranked Stone Harbor at 101 on its list of the Richest Towns in America, based on median annual real estate prices.[23]

History[edit]

Development began in the late 19th century as a beach resort along the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad line. The community was marketed to wealthy residents of Philadelphia seeking a resort destination for a second home.[21]

Stone Harbor was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 3, 1914, from portions of Middle Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 28, 1914. The borough gained a portion of Avalon on December 27, 1941.[24]

Geography[edit]

Stone Harbor is located at 39°02′30″N 74°46′08″W / 39.04167°N 74.768777°W / 39.04167; -74.768777 (39.04167,-74.768777). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.962 square miles (5.081 km2), of which, 1.398 square miles (3.620 km2) of it is land and 0.564 square miles (1.461 km2) of it (28.76%) is water.[1][2]

Stone Harbor borders Avalon Borough, North Wildwood City, Middle Township, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 159
1930 363 128.3%
1940 383 5.5%
1950 670 74.9%
1960 834 24.5%
1970 1,089 30.6%
1980 1,187 9.0%
1990 1,025 −13.6%
2000 1,128 10.0%
2010 866 −23.2%
Est. 2013 847 [11] −2.2%
Population sources: 1920–2000[25]
1920[26] 1920–1930[27]
1930–1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 866 people, 441 households, and 255.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 619.6 per square mile (239.2 /km2). There were 3,247 housing units at an average density of 2,323.3 per square mile (897.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.11% (841) White, 1.62% (14) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.12% (1) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.69% (6) from other races, and 0.46% (4) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.35% (29) of the population.[8]

There were 441 households, of which 10.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.0% were non-families. 37.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 21.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.96 and the average family size was 2.54.[8]

In the borough, 10.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 11.8% from 25 to 44, 31.4% from 45 to 64, and 41.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 60.6 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $69,286 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,969) and the median family income was $92,083 (+/- $19,643). Males had a median income of $55,417 (+/- $23,166) versus $70,208 (+/- $15,479) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $60,057 (+/- $10,700). About 2.8% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,128 people, 596 households, and 330 families residing in the borough. The population density was 796.1 people per square mile (306.7/km2). There were 3,428 housing units at an average density of 2,419.4 per square mile (932.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.76% White, 0.80% African American, 0.18% from other races, and 0.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.44% of the population.[29][30]

There were 596 households out of which 11.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.5% were non-families. 40.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 24.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.89 and the average family size was 2.50.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 12.3% under the age of 18, 3.0% from 18 to 24, 14.4% from 25 to 44, 31.6% from 45 to 64, and 38.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 58 years. For every 100 females there were 84.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.1 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,471, and the median income for a family was $67,250. Males had a median income of $52,500 versus $35,000 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,427. About 1.5% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Stone Harbor is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a six-member Borough Council, with all positions elected at large in partisan elections. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Stone Harbor Borough is Republican Suzanne M. Walters, whose term of office ends December 31, 2016.[32] Members of the Stone Harbor Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Council President Barry D. Mastrangelo (R, 2016; Administration & Finance), Albert Carusi (R, 2016; Public Safety), Judith Davies-Dunhour (R, 2015; Beach & Recreation), Joan T. Kramar (R, 2015; Public Works), Karen M. Lane (R, 2014; Utilities) and Joselyn O. Rich (R, 2014; Natural Resources).[33][34]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Stone Harbor is located in the 2nd Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[9][36][37]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[41][42]

The 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and Sam Fiocchi (R, Vineland).[43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Cape May County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year; At an annual reorganization held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Director and another to serve as Vice-Director.[46] As of 2013, Cape May County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton (Middle Township, term ends December 31, 2013),[47] Freeholder Vice-Director Leonard C. Desiderio (Sea Isle City, 2015),[48] Kristine Gabor (Upper Township, 2014)[49] and Will Morey (Wildwood Crest, 2014),[50] along with the vacant seat of M. Susan Sheppard expiring in 2013 that was vacated after Sheppard was sworn in as County Surrogate.[46][51] The county's constitutional officers are Sheriff Gary Schafer (Ocean City, 2014),[52][53] Surrogate M. Susan Sheppard (Ocean City, 2015)[54] and County Clerk Rita Fulginiti (Ocean City, 2013).[55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 778 registered voters in Stone Harbor, of which 62 (8.0%) were registered as Democrats, 588 (75.6%) were registered as Republicans and 128 (16.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[56]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 62.7% of the vote here (416 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama, who received 36.1% (240 votes), with 664 ballots cast among the borough's 801 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.9%.[57] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 69.6% of the vote here (519 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry, who received around 29.1% (217 votes), with 746 ballots cast among the borough's 920 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 81.1.[58]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.9% of the vote here (349 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.5% (172 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.4% (25 votes), with 564 ballots cast among the borough's 808 registered voters, yielding a 69.8% turnout.[59]

Education[edit]

The Stone Harbor School District serves public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 79 students and 11.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 6.75:1.[60]

Starting with the 2011-12 school year, in an agreement with the Avalon School District, public school students in grades K-4 from both communities attend school in Stone Harbor while all students in grades 5-8 attend school in Avalon.[61]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Middle Township High School in Cape May Court House, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Middle Township Public Schools, which also serves students from Avalon, Dennis Township and Woodbine.[62]

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 24.11 miles (38.80 km) of roadways, of which 21.38 miles (34.41 km) are maintained by the municipality and 2.73 miles (4.39 km) by Cape May County.[63]

Points of interest[edit]

Water Tower in Stone Harbor, New Jersey

The Stone Harbor Water Tower pumping station, built in 1924, is the oldest municipal building still in use in Stone Harbor. The tower, 133 feet (41 m) high, can be seen from almost anywhere on the island. It holds 500,000 US gallons (1,900,000 l; 420,000 imp gal) of water and is supplied by four individual fresh water wells 890 feet (270 m) deep that tap the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer.[64] In 2005, artist Peter Max developed a plan to cover the water tower with a mural made up of digital version of his paintings and artworks that covered 30 by 170 feet (9.1 by 51.8 m) that would be glued to the tower from June through September, with facsimiles of the art sold through Ocean Galleries as a fundraiser to benefit The Wetlands Institute and other charities.[20]

Stone Harbor attractions include The Wetlands Institute,[65] the Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary[66] and the Stone Harbor Museum.[67] The Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, maintain the Villa Maria by the Sea convent, which opened in June 1937.[68]

It was ranked the tenth-best beach in New Jersey in the 2008 Top 10 Beaches Contest sponsored by the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium.[69]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Department of Administration, Borough of Stone Harbor. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Stone Harbor. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 8.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Stone Harbor, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Stone Harbor borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Stone Harbor borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stone Harbor, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 3, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Stone Harbor, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Master Plan, Borough of Stone Harbor. Accessed May 22, 2008.
  20. ^ a b Strauss, Robert. "WORTH NOTING; Stone Harbor Gets A Coat of Many Colors", The New York Times, June 26, 2005. Accessed April 29, 2013.
  21. ^ a b Lyttle, Bethany. "High & Low | Stone Harbor, N.J. - Fine White Sand and Summer Homes", The New York Times, October 10, 2008. Accessed April 29, 2013.
  22. ^ Stone Harbor, Cape May, NJ, Forbes, accessed April 20, 2006
  23. ^ Strauss, Robert. "WORTH NOTING; Feeling Flush, Big Spender? You Must Not Be From Here", The New York Times, May 5, 2002. Accessed August 30, 2013. "It's like this -- Alpine's $1.3 million median house sale over the last 18 months is chump change when compared with Atherton's $3.4 million. Farther down the list are Saddle River (37 on the list, $1.23 million), and the Shore resorts Spring Lake (79, $859,500), Stone Harbor (101, $807,500) and Avalon (141, $686,250)."
  24. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 116. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cape May County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Stone Harbor borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Stone Harbor borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Stone Harbor borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 13, 2012.
  32. ^ Suzanne M. Walters - (Republican), New Jersey Conference of Mayors. Accessed August 12, 2014.
  33. ^ Borough Council Standing Committees, Stone Harbor, New Jersey. Accessed August 12, 2014.
  34. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Stone Harbor, New Jersey. Accessed August 12, 2014.
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ a b Freeholders Home Page, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  47. ^ Gerald M. Thornton, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Leonard C. Desiderio, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Kristine Gabor, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Will Morey, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Cape May County Installs Returning Freeholder Leonard Desiderio and Names Director and Vice-Director, Cape May County, New Jersey, January 3, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder Leonard C. Desiderio, who was re-elected in November to serve a three-year term, was sworn in by Superior Court Judge J. Christopher Gibson.... Additionally at the meeting, Freeholder Gerald M. Thornton was re-elected Director of the Board and Freeholder Desiderio was elected Vice-Director."
  52. ^ Sheriff's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Sheriff, Cape May County Sheriff. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Surrogate, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ County Clerk's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Cape May, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  57. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  58. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  59. ^ 2009 Governor: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  60. ^ District information for Stone Harbor School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 12, 2014.
  61. ^ Avalon Elementary School 2013 School Report Card, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 12, 2014. "The district has entered into a “send-receive” agreement with the neighboring district on the island to consolidate the instructional programs in the two schools. Stone Harbor houses the K-4 programs for both districts and Avalon houses grades 5-8."
  62. ^ Middle Township High School 2013 School Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 12, 2014. "Middle Township High School is a four-year, accredited, comprehensive high school situated in central Cape May County. The school serves the communities of Middle Township, Dennis Township, Avalon, Stone Harbor, and now Woodbine Borough."
  63. ^ Cape May County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  64. ^ Department of Water & Sewer, Borough of Stone Harbor. Accessed august 30, 2013.
  65. ^ About Us, The Wetlands Institute. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  66. ^ About the Sanctuary, Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  67. ^ About the Museum, Stone Harbor Museum. Accessed August 12, 2014.
  68. ^ Gillin-Schwartz, Megan. "Villa Maria-by-the Sea celebrates 70th Anniversary", Cape May County Herald, July 10, 2007. Accessed August 30, 2013. "On July 8, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart celebrated the 70th Anniversary of the treasured Villa Maria-by-the Sea retreat home on 111th Street with a celebratory mass for benefactors, and an open house for the public.... The retreat house opened June 20, 1937; a little more than four months after the first piece of lumber was laid."
  69. ^ Urgo, Jacqueline L. (May 23, 2008). "Triumph for South Jersey". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on 2008-06-05. Retrieved 2008-05-30. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Avalon
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
North Wildwood